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Ecology and Evolution

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 14

November 2013

Volume 3, Issue 14

Pages i–ii, 4621–4849

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Corrigendum
    1. You have full text access to this Open Access content
      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 25 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.912

  2. Original Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Corrigendum
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Testing for intraspecific postzygotic isolation between cryptic lineages of Pseudacris crucifer (pages 4621–4630)

      Kathryn A. Stewart and Stephen C. Lougheed

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.851

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      Secondary contact between diverging lineages may play a significant role in the origins of species. We evaluated the consequences of hybridization between two such lineages in the temperate frog, the spring peeper. We found that lineages differ in tadpole survival but that F1 hybrids are equivalent in some aspects of fitness with higher than average mass at metamorphosis compared with pure parental crosses.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A first-generation microsatellite linkage map of the ruff (pages 4631–4640)

      Lindsay L. Farrell, Terry Burke, Jon Slate and David B. Lank

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.830

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      A linkage map of the ruff (Philomachus pugnax) genome was constructed based on segregation analysis of 58 microsatellite loci from 381 captive-bred individuals spanning fourteen breeding years and comprising 64 families. This is the first linkage map created in the ruff and is a major step toward providing genomic resources for this enigmatic species. It will provide an essential framework for mapping of phenotypically and behaviorally important loci in the ruff.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Measuring and evaluating morphological asymmetry in fish: distinct lateral dimorphism in the jaws of scale-eating cichlids (pages 4641–4647)

      Hiroki Hata, Masaki Yasugi, Yuichi Takeuchi, Satoshi Takahashi and Michio Hori

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.849

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      This study provided an appropriate method for measuring and testing the trait asymmetry in fish and confirmed laterality in the morphology of the Tanganyikan scale-eating cichlids Perissodus microlepis and P. straeleni. Specifically, we demonstrated the distinct lateral dimorphism in the cichlids by the measure of two traits, the lateral difference in the jaw skeleton and the neurocranium–vertebrae angle, and by the model selection using maximum likelihood.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Morphological divergence and flow-induced phenotypic plasticity in a native fish from anthropogenically altered stream habitats (pages 4648–4657)

      Nathan R. Franssen, Laura K. Stewart and Jacob F. Schaefer

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.842

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      Reservoirs can drive morphological divergence of resident fish populations, but mechanisms behind observed divergence are elusive. We quantified shape variation in a native fish from reservoir and stream habitats as well as reared offspring from both habitat types in common garden with flow and no flow treatments. Results suggest some portions of morphological variation was preserved in offspring but flow-induced plasticity is likely not responsible for morphological variation observed in the field.

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      Known unknowns in an imperfect world: incorporating uncertainty in recruitment estimates using multi-event capture–recapture models (pages 4658–4668)

      Marine Desprez, Clive R. McMahon, Mark A. Hindell, Robert Harcourt and Olivier Gimenez

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.846

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      Studying demography in order to manage and conserve wild animals is challenging because some components of their life history, in particular the critical transition from a prebreeder to a first-time breeder, are difficult to observe and record with certainty in the field. Using a comprehensive longitudinal dataset on southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina), we show how using a recent and powerful capture–recapture model greatly increases precision and accuracy of the demographic parameters compared with the standard mark–recapture approach.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Genetic monogamy despite variable ecological conditions and social environment in the cooperatively breeding apostlebird (pages 4669–4682)

      Miyako H. Warrington, Lee Ann Rollins, Nichola J. Raihani, Andrew F. Russell and Simon C. Griffith

      Article first published online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.844

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      In this cooperatively breeding Australian bird, we found no evidence that the genetic mating system varied temporally, even though our study spanned some extreme ends of the “boom and bust” cycle typical in the arid zone. Typically, females are genetically faithful to their social partner with very few cases of multiple paternity or maternity over the sample of families genotyped.

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      Environmental factors influence both abundance and genetic diversity in a widespread bird species (pages 4683–4695)

      Yang Liu, Simone Webber, Katharine Bowgen, Lucie Schmaltz, Katharine Bradley, Peter Halvarsson, Mohanad Abdelgadir and Michael Griesser

      Article first published online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.856

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      We found that ecological factors can have strong impacts on both population size per se and intrapopulation genetic variation of the house sparrows at a small scale. On a more general level, our data indicate that a patchy environment and low dispersal rate can result in fine-scale patterns of genetic diversity.

    8. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      UV radiation is the primary factor driving the variation in leaf phenolics across Chinese grasslands (pages 4696–4710)

      Litong Chen, Kechang Niu, Yi Wu, Yan Geng, Zhaorong Mi, Dan F.B. Flynn and Jin-Sheng He

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.862

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      In this work, we quantify for the first time the variation in leaf phenolics, and relationships between leaf phenolics, environmental factors, and functional traits across a large group of species at the biogeographic scale. We demonstrate that the concentration of these compounds, typically understood to primarily serve as defense against herbivores, clearly has an adaptive value in response to UV radiation. This finding demonstrates that this adaptive value holds across a wide phylogenetic range and at the biome scale, both of which have not previously been demonstrated.

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      Evaluating the “recovery level” of endangered species without prior information before alien invasion (pages 4711–4721)

      Yuya Watari, Shota Nishijima, Marina Fukasawa, Fumio Yamada, Shintaro Abe and Tadashi Miyashita

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.863

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      To obtain continuous social and financial support for invasive species management, quantitative assessment of recovery of native species or ecosystems is important, but it is often difficult due to lack of information prior to the introduction of invaders. In this study, we propose a novel approach for estimating carrying capacity of native species from long-term monitoring data, which can be used as a specific benchmark for measuring the achievement level of invasive species management. By applying this approach to the mongoose eradication project on Amami-Oshima Island, Japan, we found that endangered endemic vertebrates had recovered to the levels of estimated carrying capacities at about 20–40% of local sites.

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      The magnitude of local adaptation under genotype-dependent dispersal (pages 4722–4735)

      Daniel I. Bolnick and Sarah P. Otto

      Article first published online: 30 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.850

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      Non-random dispersal of genotypes across habitats can substantially promote local adaptation. We present an analytical model of a simple 2-patch and 2-allele system, which allows us to calculate the extent to which nonrandom dispersal inflates the rate and equilibrium extent of adaptive divergence. Furthermore, we show that in many circumstances, spatial segregation of genotypes can explain a large fraction of the progress toward adaptive divergence.

    11. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Strong male-biased operational sex ratio in a breeding population of loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) inferred by paternal genotype reconstruction analysis (pages 4736–4747)

      Jacob A. Lasala, J. Scott Harrison, Kris L. Williams and David C. Rostal

      Article first published online: 30 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.761

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      Our study uses microsatellites in conjunction with exclusion analysis of multiple paternity to establish the number of males contributing to a nesting population of loggerhead sea turtles. We suggest that the operational sex ratio is male biased at this site.

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      The contrasted evolutionary fates of deep-sea chemosynthetic mussels (Bivalvia, Bathymodiolinae) (pages 4748–4766)

      Justine Thubaut, Nicolas Puillandre, Baptiste Faure, Corinne Cruaud and Sarah Samadi

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.749

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      This new multigene phylogeny challenges previous gradualist evolutionary scenarios, such as the “shallow to deep” hypothesis. The evolutionary history of the Bathymodiolinae appears more complex than previously thought. Overall, our data suggest that for deep-sea mussels, the high specialization to vent habitats provides ecological success in this harsh habitat but also brings the lineage to a kind of evolutionary dead-end.

    13. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Comparative phylogeographic study of Hosta sieboldiana and Hosta albomarginata (Asparagaceae) in Japan (pages 4767–4785)

      Sangryong Lee and Masayuki Maki

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.838

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      We analyzed variations in chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) in the widespread herbaceous species Hosta sieboldiana and Hosta albomarginata across large portions of their geographic ranges in the Japanese archipelago. Our objective was to compare the biogeographic histories and phylogeographic structures of the two congeneric species in the Japanese archipelago. We found that Hosta sieboldiana had lower haplotype diversity than Hosta albomarginata.

    14. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Microsatellite markers reveal multiple origins for Italian weedy rice (pages 4786–4798)

      Annabelle Grimm, Silvia Fogliatto, Peter Nick, Aldo Ferrero and Francesco Vidotto

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.848

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      The results of the morphological and genetic studies described in this article enable to distinguish groups of weedy rice and support a model for its origin in the collection area. The awn morphology seems to be a crucial trait in different weedy rice groups. The origin of weedy rice in northern Italy can probably be found in the first cultivars bred in this area.

    15. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Differentiation in neutral genes and a candidate gene in the pied flycatcher: using biological archives to track global climate change (pages 4799–4814)

      Kerstin Kuhn, Klaus Schwenk, Christiaan Both, David Canal, Ulf S. Johansson, Steven van der Mije, Till Töpfer and Martin Päckert

      Article first published online: 1 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.855

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      In Western Europe, pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) have insufficiently adapted their breeding phenology to the ongoing advance of food peaks and consequently suffered local population declines. We address the question whether this population decline led to a loss of genetic variation, using two neutral marker sets, and one potentially selectively non-neutral marker. We report temporal changes in genetic diversity in extant populations and biological archives over more than a century, using samples from sites differing in the extent of climate change.

    16. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Heterozygosity is linked to the costs of immunity in nestling great tits (Parus major) (pages 4815–4827)

      Beatrice Voegeli, Verena Saladin, Michèle Wegmann and Heinz Richner

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.854

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      In this study, we manipulated growth conditions of nestling great tits by manipulating brood size and prevalence of a common ectoparasite. We separately analyzed effects of heterozygosity of neutral markers and of functional markers. We show that the detection and strength of HFCs depends on parasite abundance, but not brood size manipulation, and that neutral heterozygosity is related to the costs of the increased investments in immunity under parasite pressure.

    17. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Synergistic effects of the invasive Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera) and climate change on aquatic amphibian survival (pages 4828–4840)

      Daniel Saenz, Erin M. Fucik and Matthew A. Kwiatkowski

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.857

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      Invasive species and climate change are major threats to amphibian populations. Climate change can have an impact on native and invasive species by altering the timing of species interactions. Our results suggest that shifts toward earlier breeding in amphibians or delayed leaf fall, largely determined by warmer weather, can reduce the survival of amphibian larvae in the presence of the invasive Chinese tallow tree.

    18. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Nonrandom dispersal drives phenotypic divergence within a bird population (pages 4841–4848)

      Carlos Camacho, David Canal and Jaime Potti

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.563

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      Although gene flow is assumed to counteract evolutionary differentiation, directional gene flow may actually reinforce divergence of populations. We show that natal dispersal of male pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca inhabiting contrasting, adjacent habitats over two decades was nonrandom with respect to size (tarsus length) and intensity of dispersers flow, leading to rapid phenotypic differentiation in a heritable trait. This result illustrates new ways in which dispersal can influence microevolution at a short geographical scale.

  3. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Corrigendum
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Disentangling environmental correlates of vascular plant biodiversity in a Mediterranean hotspot (page 4849)

      Rafael Molina-Venegas, Abelardo Aparicio, Francisco José Pina, Benito Valdés and Juan Arroyo

      Article first published online: 25 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.904

      This article corrects:

      Disentangling environmental correlates of vascular plant biodiversity in a Mediterranean hotspot

      Vol. 3, Issue 11, 3879–3894, Article first published online: 15 SEP 2013

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