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Ecology and Evolution

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 16

December 2013

Volume 3, Issue 16

Pages i–ii, 5127–5278

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Review
    1. You have full text access to this Open Access content
      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.937

  2. Original Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Review
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The evolution of birdsong on islands (pages 5127–5140)

      Jennifer Morinay, Gonçalo C. Cardoso, Claire Doutrelant and Rita Covas

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.864

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      We studied whether insularity leads to convergent song characteristics in birds. We found a decrease in aggressive song elements on islands, but other aspects of song related to complexity and performance did not vary consistently.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Life history of the Glanville fritillary butterfly in fragmented versus continuous landscapes (pages 5141–5156)

      Anne Duplouy, Suvi Ikonen and Ilkka Hanski

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.885

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      Habitat fragmentation may impose strong selection on species and lead to evolution of life histories with possible consequences for demographic dynamics. We report the results of common garden studies on the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia) originating from two highly fragmented landscapes, in Finland and Sweden, and from two continuous landscapes, in Sweden and Estonia, conducted in a large outdoor cage (32 by 26 m) and in the laboratory.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Antiparasite treatments reduce humoral immunity and impact oxidative status in raptor nestlings (pages 5157–5166)

      Sveinn Are Hanssen, Jan Ove Bustnes, Lisbeth Schnug, Sophie Bourgeon, Trond Vidar Johnsen, Manuel Ballesteros, Christian Sonne, Dorte Herzke, Igor Eulaers, Veerle L. B. Jaspers, Adrian Covaci, Marcel Eens, Duncan J. Halley, Truls Moum, Rolf Anker Ims and Kjell Einar Erikstad

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.891

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      Parasites are natural stressors that may have multiple negative effects on their host as they usurp energy and nutrients and may lead to costly immune responses that may lead to oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to explore effects of parasites by treating chicks of two raptor species against both internal and external parasites. Treatment against ectoparasites led to a reduction in circulating immunoglobulin plasma levels in male chicks. Treatment against endoparasites reduced immunoglobulin plasma levels in white-tailed sea eagles. Furthermore, total oxidant status was higher when not receiving any parasite reduction treatment and when receiving both endo- and ectoparasitic reduction treatment compared with receiving only one antiparasite treatment.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Deceptive single-locus taxonomy and phylogeography: Wolbachia-associated divergence in mitochondrial DNA is not reflected in morphology and nuclear markers in a butterfly species (pages 5167–5176)

      Ullasa Kodandaramaiah, Thomas J. Simonsen, Sean Bromilow, Niklas Wahlberg and Felix Sperling

      Version of Record online: 25 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.886

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      The mitochondrial DNA of North American populations of the butterfly Coenonympha tullia was found to have two deeply divergent clades. We find that this divergence was not reflected in nuclear data or morphological traits. Based on the additional analyses, we conclude that the mitochondrial structure is due to indirect selection on the mitochondrial genome by Wolbachia.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Long-term fertilization of a boreal Norway spruce forest increases the temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon mineralization (pages 5177–5188)

      Elsa Coucheney, Monika Strömgren, Thomas Z. Lerch and Anke M. Herrmann

      Version of Record online: 25 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.895

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      Boreal ecosystems store one-third of global soil organic carbon and are particularly sensitive to climate warming. In this study, we found that long-term nutrient fertilization increases the temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon in those ecosystems, but no direct relationship was found with the modification of soil organic matter characteristics nor microbial community composition due to the fertilization treatment. This research would help to take into account the effect of fertilization managements on soil carbon storage under warmer climate in carbon cycling numerical models.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Underestimating the frequency, strength and cost of antipredator responses with data from GPS collars: an example with wolves and elk (pages 5189–5200)

      Scott Creel, John A. Winnie Jr and David Christianson

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.896

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      Typical data from GPS radiocollars deployed on predators will underestimate the frequency and strength of antipredator responses by prey. Using data from African wild dogs and wolves, we found the underestimation bias to be >10-fold. We reevaluate recent inferences on the effect of wolf presence on elk in light of these results.

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      Interactions between assembly order and temperature can alter both short- and long-term community composition (pages 5201–5208)

      Christopher F. Clements, Philip H. Warren, Ben Collen, Tim Blackburn, Nicholas Worsfold and Owen Petchey

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.901

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      Both the order in which species arrive in a community, and environmental conditions, such as temperature, are known to affect community structure. We show that short-term community structure is altered by assembly order effects and long-term community structure is generally driven by temperature, but in addition that temperature and the order in which species invade a habitat can occasionally interact to profoundly affect community composition.

    8. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Natural variation in chemosensation: lessons from an island nematode (pages 5209–5224)

      Angela McGaughran, Katy Morgan and Ralf J. Sommer

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.902

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      Understanding the evolutionary forces that shape natural systems requires characterization of phenotypic traits in an ecological context. We examine chemosensation in the nematode, Pristionchus pacificus, and find that strains show extreme variation in their odor-guided behavior. This variance has a strong ecological component.

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Nondetection sampling bias in marked presence-only data (pages 5225–5236)

      Trevor J. Hefley, Andrew J. Tyre, David M. Baasch and Erin E. Blankenship

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.887

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      Nondetection sampling bias associated with presence-only data is equivalent to missing data. We show that nondetection sampling bias can result in biased parameter estimates and predictions, but remedial methods are available from the statistical literature on missing data.

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      Invasion biology in non-free-living species: interactions between abiotic (climatic) and biotic (host availability) factors in geographical space in crayfish commensals (Ostracoda, Entocytheridae) (pages 5237–5253)

      Alexandre Mestre, Josep A. Aguilar-Alberola, David Baldry, Husamettin Balkis, Adam Ellis, Jose A. Gil-Delgado, Karsten Grabow, Göran Klobučar, Antonín Kouba, Ivana Maguire, Andreas Martens, Ayşegül Mülayim, Juan Rueda, Burkhard Scharf, Menno Soes, Juan S. Monrós and Francesc Mesquita-Joanes

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.897

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      We study the effects of biotic interactions on the predicted distribution of non-free-living alien species. We combine an ecological niche modeling (ENM) approach with the theoretical framework of set theory, by evaluating the potential distribution area of the model organisms, that is, Entocytheridae Ostracoda, and their dependence on their crayfish hosts' distribution. We found that the potential distribution of some symbiont species is constrained by both biotic (host presence) and abiotic (climatic) factors, but the expansion of others might be mostly limited just by the host presence.

    11. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Soil pathogen communities associated with native and non-native Phragmites australis populations in freshwater wetlands (pages 5254–5267)

      Eric B. Nelson and Mary Ann Karp

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.900

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      This article summarized work designed to assess communities of soil pathogens associated with invasive and noninvasive wetland genotypes of Phragmites australis. These results suggest that nonindigenous plant species that dominate landscapes may “cultivate” a different soil pathogen community to their rhizosphere than those of rarer indigenous species.

  3. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Review
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Smartphones in ecology and evolution: a guide for the app-rehensive (pages 5268–5278)

      Amber G. F. Teacher, David J. Griffiths, David J. Hodgson and Richard Inger

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.888

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      Smartphones and their apps (application software) are now used by millions of people worldwide and represent a powerful combination of sensors, information transfer, and computing power that deserves better exploitation by ecological and evolutionary researchers. We outline the development process for research apps, provide contrasting case studies for two new research apps, and scan the research horizon to suggest how apps can contribute to the rapid collection, interpretation, and dissemination of data in ecology and evolutionary biology.

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