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Ecology and Evolution

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 6

June 2013

Volume 3, Issue 6

Pages i–ii, 1427–1835

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Reviews
    5. Erratum
    1. You have full text access to this Open Access content
      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.653

  2. Original Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Reviews
    5. Erratum
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Pathways of introduction of the invasive aquatic plant Cabomba caroliniana (pages 1427–1439)

      Andrée McCracken, Jillian D. Bainard, Michelle C. Miller and Brian C. Husband

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.530

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      Cabomba caroliniana is considered an aggressive aquatic invasive species, and there is much interest in determining the source of introduced populations. Using chloroplast DNA sequences and genome size variation, our research presents evidence to suggest that the movement of C. caroliniana into Canada is from populations in the northeastern United States, and less likely to be from commercial sources. We discuss several possible pathways of introduction for C. caroliniana across North America.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Wheat genotypes differing in aluminum tolerance differ in their growth response to CO2 enrichment in acid soils (pages 1440–1448)

      Qiuying Tian, Xinxin Zhang, Yan Gao, Wenming Bai, Feng Ge, Yibing Ma and Wen-Hao Zhang

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.559

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      Wheat genotypes with contrasting tolerance to aluminium showed different growth response to elevated CO2 when grown in acid soil. Exudation of malate from root apices of aluminum-tolerant ET8 genotype was greater than those of Al-sensitive ES8 genotype under both ambient and elevated CO2, and the malate exudation rate expressed on individual root apex was not affected by elevated CO2. These results have important implications for our understanding how plants respond to elevated [CO2] grown in unfavorable edaphic conditions in general and in acid soils in particular.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Multi-factor climate change effects on insect herbivore performance (pages 1449–1460)

      Christoph Scherber, David J. Gladbach, Karen Stevnbak, Rune Juelsborg Karsten, Inger Kappel Schmidt, Anders Michelsen, Kristian Rost Albert, Klaus Steenberg Larsen, Teis Nørgaard Mikkelsen, Claus Beier and Søren Christensen

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.564

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      In a multi-factor climate change experiment, we tested effects of three independent global change drivers on insect herbivore performance. We found that most drivers adversely affected herbivore performance. The most surprising result of our study, however, was that the number of global change drivers (0, 1, 2 or 3) additively affected herbivore performance.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Spatial scales of genetic structure and gene flow in Calochortus albus (Liliaceae) (pages 1461–1470)

      Jillian M. Henss, Jackson R. Moeller, Terra J. Theim and Thomas J. Givnish

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.566

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      Studies of spatial genetic structure in populations of Calochortus albus in northern California confirm that gene flow in this species occurs only at mean distances less than 50 m. This accords with a hypothesis to account for extensive speciation, narrow endemism, geographic cohesion of clades, and convergent patterns of adaptive radiation in the genus based on limited seed dispersal.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The geometry of the Pareto front in biological phenotype space (pages 1471–1483)

      Hila Sheftel, Oren Shoval, Avi Mayo and Uri Alon

      Article first published online: 17 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.528

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      We studied the effect of trade-offs between tasks on the suite of variation of phenotypes. We find that, for a wide range of performance function shapes, Pareto optimal phenotypes lie in morphospace on low-dimensional polygons with mildly curved edges, whose vertices are phenotypes specialized for a single task, known as archetypes. We also present bounds on the Pareto front for general, non-monotonic performance functions, showing that the suite of variation is restricted to a region spanning the archetypes.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Surprisingly little population genetic structure in a fungus-associated beetle despite its exploitation of multiple hosts (pages 1484–1494)

      Corlett W. Wood, Hannah M. Donald, Vincent A. Formica and Edmund D. Brodie III

      Article first published online: 17 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.560

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      The diversity of the resource community is expected to affect landscape-level population structure in heterogeneous environments because resources often function as barriers to gene flow. We found no relationship between resource community diversity and population differentiation in a beetle metapopulation, but the resources (fungi) do not appear to be barriers to gene flow in this species. The role of resource communities in structuring genetic variation should be further explored in species known to exhibit resource-associated population structure.

    7. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Population differentiation of the African cyprinid Barbus neumayeri across dissolved oxygen regimes (pages 1495–1506)

      Robert Harniman, Thomas J. S. Merritt, Lauren J. Chapman, David Lesbarrères and Mery L. Martinez

      Article first published online: 17 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.561

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      Barbus neumayeri population structure across oxygen regimes.

    8. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Water temperature, not fish morph, determines parasite infections of sympatric Icelandic threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) (pages 1507–1517)

      Anssi Karvonen, Bjarni K. Kristjánsson, Skúli Skúlason, Maiju Lanki, Christian Rellstab and Jukka Jokela

      Article first published online: 17 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.568

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      Ecological differences in selection by parasites have recently been hypothesized to facilitate evolutionary differentiation of freshwater fish morphs. However, as parasites may also respond directly to abiotic environment, such as water temperature, it is not clear how consistent these selection gradients are when abiotic factors change. We examined parasite pressure in sympatric morphs of threespine stickleback in two Icelandic lakes with opposing habitat-specific water temperature gradients. We found higher infestation in fish living in higher temperature irrespective of the fish morph, but also a strong effect of host ecology in a morph living in deep cold water habitat. These results suggest complex interactions between water temperature and biotic factors in determining the parasite community structure, a pattern that may have implications for differentiation of stickleback morphs.

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Geographic mode of speciation in a mountain specialist Avian family endemic to the Palearctic (pages 1518–1528)

      Sergei V. Drovetski, Georgy Semenov, Sofya S. Drovetskaya, Igor V. Fadeev, Yaroslav A. Red'kin and Gary Voelker

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.539

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      In this study, we test whether greater diversity of habitats stratified along an elevation gradient in the mountains promotes sympatric speciation in birds. Using sequences of one mtDNA gene and one sex specific intron, we reconstructed a complete species-level phylogeny of Prunellidae, which we used to reconstruct the family's biogeographic history. Our data suggest that allopatric speciation (not to include peripatric) is the predominant geographic mode of speciation in Prunellidae despite the favorable conditions for ecological diversification in the mountains and range overlaps among species.

    10. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Ejaculate investment and attractiveness in the stalk-eyed fly, Diasemopsis meigenii (pages 1529–1538)

      Elisabeth Harley, Leanna M. Birge, Jennifer Small, Samuel J. Tazzyman, Andrew Pomiankowski and Kevin Fowler

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.544

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      Male attractiveness in stalk-eyed flies (large eyespan) is not associated with greater ejaculate transfer (spermatophore size or sperm number), despite attractive males having bigger testes and accessory glands. This does not support the hypothesis that females gain fertility benefits from mating with attractive males. Such males appear to restrict ejaculate allocation per mating so as to participate in a greater number of mating events.

    11. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Modeling ecological minimum requirements for distribution of greater sage-grouse leks: implications for population connectivity across their western range, U.S.A (pages 1539–1551)

      Steven T. Knick, Steven E. Hanser and Kristine L. Preston

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.557

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      Habitat loss is a significant concern to conserving greater sage-grouse, a candidate for endangered species listing in the United States. We mapped current habitat availability based on presence of ecological minimum requirements to guide conservation actions within population boundaries and in connecting corridors. Our emphasis on minimum requirements rather than on models describing average or optimum conditions provides a conceptual and statistical foundation for modeling habitats in future unknown distributions predicted under climate change.

    12. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Duplication and population dynamics shape historic patterns of selection and genetic variation at the major histocompatibility complex in rodents (pages 1552–1568)

      Jamie C. Winternitz and John P. Wares

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.567

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      An unresolved challenge for evolutionary biology and wildlife conservation is to better understand how species that routinely experience high degrees of genetic drift can maintain immunogenetic diversity over evolutionary timescales. In this study we characterized variation at the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) in the cyclic montane vole (Microtus montanus), and investigated the influence of population dynamics (i.e., stable, cyclic, or bottlenecked populations) and gene duplication on patterns of allelic diversity and signals of selection across 16 rodent species.

    13. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Effects of clonality on the genetic variability of rare, insular species: the case of Ruta microcarpa from the Canary Islands (pages 1569–1579)

      M. Meloni, A. Reid, J. Caujapé-Castells, Á. Marrero, J. M. Fernández-Palacios, R. A. Mesa-Coelo and E. Conti

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.571

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      We investigated the effects of clonal propagation on the genetic structure of rare, insular species using the Canarian endemic Ruta microcarpa as a model. We found that, even though clonality has genetic costs related to inbreeding depression, clonal reproduction seems to positively affect genetic diversity of species and may help in their short-term survival. Moreover, the extent of clonality seems to be related to population size, degree of isolation and presence of environmental stress characterising different populations.

    14. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Embryonic lethality leads to hybrid male inviability in hybrids between Drosophila melanogaster and D. santomea (pages 1580–1589)

      Jackie Gavin-Smyth and Daniel R. Matute

      Article first published online: 23 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.573

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      Drosophila melanogaster and D. santomea diverged more than 10 million years ago, and when crossed produce sterile adult females. Adult hybrid males are absent from all interspecific crosses. We found that hybrid males die predominantly as embryos with severe segment-specification defects while a large proportion of hybrid females embryos hatch and survive to adulthood.

    15. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Parallel and non-parallel morphological divergence among foraging specialists in European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus) (pages 1590–1602)

      Anna Siwertsson, Rune Knudsen, Colin E. Adams, Kim Præbel and Per-Arne Amundsen

      Article first published online: 25 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.562

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      This study demonstrates parallel morphological divergence between sympatric foraging specialists within populations of whitefish in three different lakes. Together with previous knowledge about these systems, this suggests that these populations may be in an early stage of divergence of specialized morphs.

    16. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Reevaluation of a classic phylogeographic barrier: new techniques reveal the influence of microgeographic climate variation on population divergence (pages 1603–1613)

      J. Angel Soto-Centeno, Lisa N. Barrow, Julie M. Allen and David L. Reed

      Article first published online: 25 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.576

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      We evaluated the mtDNA divergence and relationships within Geomys pinetis to assess the status of formerly recognized Geomys taxa. Additionally, we integrated new hypothesis-based tests in ecological niche models (ENM) to provide greater insight into causes for divergence and potential barriers to gene flow. Populations of G. pinetis are separated by a ribbon of unsuitable habitat at the contact zone of eastern and western lineages that forms a significant barrier promoting microgeographic isolation that helps maintain ecological and genetic divergence.

    17. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Paternal inheritance of growth in fish pursuing alternative reproductive tactics (pages 1614–1625)

      Sabine Wirtz-Ocaňa, Dolores Schütz, Gudrun Pachler and Michael Taborsky

      Article first published online: 28 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.570

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      Standardized breeding experiments using unrelated offspring and maternal half-sibs revealed highly divergent growth patterns of male young sired by bourgeois or parasitic males, whereas the growth of female offspring of both male types did not differ. Food had a significant modifying effect on growth, but neither the quantity of breeding substrate nor ambient temperature affected growth, and none of the environmental factors tested influenced the choice of male life histories. We conclude that in Lamprologus callipterus growth rates of bourgeois and parasitic males are paternally inherited, and that male and female growth is phenotypically plastic to only a small degree.

    18. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Physical disturbance shapes vascular plant diversity more profoundly than fire in the sagebrush steppe of southeastern Idaho, U.S.A (pages 1626–1641)

      Matt Lavin, Tyler J. Brummer, Ryan Quire, Bruce D. Maxwell and Lisa J. Rew

      Article first published online: 28 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.574

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      In the highly seasonal semi-arid North American sagebrush steppe, physical disturbance changes not just the alpha diversity of the community, but also the beta and phylogenetic beta diversity. Fire disturbance by itself does not have such an effect. Physical disturbance much more than fire fundamentally changes the plant biodiversity that is available to regenerate a plant community postdisturbance in much of the sagebrush steppe.

    19. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Molecular approach to describing a seed-based food web: the post-dispersal granivore community of an invasive plant (pages 1642–1652)

      Jonathan G. Lundgren, Pavel Saska and Alois Honěk

      Article first published online: 28 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.580

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      Pairing gut content analysis of arthropods with protein-marking of seeds revealed a much more diverse community of post-dispersal granivores than has previously been predicted for a single seed species. Linkage strength of particular granivores did not always correlate well with seed removal rates, potentially due to the fact that relative densities of these taxa were not well measured by pitfall traps. The method of seed marking thus has merit as a tool used in conjunction with other methods (e.g., seed removal, laboratory feeding trials, etc.) to help resolve which species are potentially important granivores of plants.

    20. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Limited contemporary gene flow and high self-replenishment drives peripheral isolation in an endemic coral reef fish (pages 1653–1666)

      Martin H. van der Meer, John B. Horne, Michael G. Gardner, Jean-Paul A. Hobbs, Morgan Pratchett and Lynne van Herwerden

      Article first published online: 29 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.584

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      Ongoing degradation of coral reefs has caused declines in the coral reef fish associated with them. Here we show that the endemic coral reef fish, Chaetodon tricinctus, is abundant and has high mtDNA and msatDNA gene flow within its central region. However, the peripheral location receives little mtDNA and msatDNA gene flow and is most at risk should local extinction occur.

    21. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A tool for protected area management: multivariate control charts ‘cope’ with rare variable communities (pages 1667–1676)

      Thomas B. Stringell, Roger N. Bamber, Mark Burton, Charles Lindenbaum, Lucie R. Skates and William G. Sanderson

      Article first published online: 1 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.585

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      The aim of the study was to explore how traditional and multivariate control chart (MCC) approaches to the assessment of management success would apply to rare, variable habitats in protected areas. In this paper we show how the relatively novel MCC tool can be applied by environmental managers who are beset by significant variation in protected communities, have little scope for comparison elsewhere, but nevertheless are compelled by logic and legislation to make assessments. The issues highlighted are common problems in terrestrial and marine conservation as well as environmental management as a whole.

    22. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Population admixture and high larval viability among urban toads (pages 1677–1691)

      Kazuko Hase, Naruo Nikoh and Masakazu Shimada

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.578

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      In urban Tokyo, a population admixture has emerged from two lineages of Japanese common toad: native Bufo japonicus formosus and non-native B. japonicus japonicus, of which the latter was introduced in the early 20th century. Our genetic clustering analyses of the admixed populations revealed that genotype displacement from native B. japonicus formosus to introduced B. japonicus japonicus had occurred. And assessment of larval viability indicated that the fitness of the Japanese common toad B. japonicus in urban Tokyo may be increasing with the assistance of non-native individuals.

    23. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Belowground interactions shift the relative importance of direct and indirect genetic effects (pages 1692–1701)

      Mark A. Genung, Joseph K. Bailey and Jennifer A. Schweitzer

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.582

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      Intraspecific genetic variation can affect a range of properties associated with a focal plant, but the effects of genetic variation in a focal plant's neighbors has received less attention. We found that genotypic variation in neighboring plants indirectly affected the traits of focal plants, with implications for plant evolution and productivity. The effects of neighbors were strongest when plants were allowed to interact belowground, and when the response variable was belowground biomass.

    24. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Forecasting deforestation and carbon emissions in tropical developing countries facing demographic expansion: a case study in Madagascar (pages 1702–1716)

      Ghislain Vieilledent, Clovis Grinand and Romuald Vaudry

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.550

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      Using new methods and statistical tools (including R/GRASS scripts and the new phcfM R package), we demonstrate that the fast population growth in Madagascar (+3.39% per year) can be expected to significantly increase the intensity of deforestation by 2030 (up to +1.17% per year in densely populated areas) and estimate the corresponding CO2 emissions to be of 2.28 and 0.26 ton.ha−1.year−1 in the humid and spiny-dry forest, respectively. We underline the risk of an increase in the speed of deforestation at the global scale due to rapid population expansion in tropical developing countries where people rely heavily on forests for their livelihoods.

    25. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Ecological causes of morphological evolution in the three-spined stickleback (pages 1717–1726)

      Rowena Spence, Robert J. Wootton, Iain Barber, Mirosław Przybylski and Carl Smith

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.581

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      We investigated the ecological mechanisms that underpin adaptive evolutionary change in the three-spined stickleback. On the Hebridean Island of North Uist, where sticklebacks have undergone a striking morphological radiation, we investigated alternative hypotheses; calcium availability and predation as the major selective agents. We detected a significant effect of dissolved calcium on morphology but no effect of predation, contradicting the generally held view that predation is the primary agent of plate and spine morph selection.

    26. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Maternal and environmental influences on egg size and juvenile life-history traits in Pacific salmon (pages 1727–1740)

      Douglas C. Braun, David A. Patterson and John D. Reynolds

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.555

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      Maternal influences on juvenile life history traits are driven by trade-offs faced by mothers and shaped by environmental conditions. We found strong effects of both maternal phenotype and environmental conditions on egg size and subsequent juvenile fitness-related traits in wild populations of sockeye salmon.

    27. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Life-history strategy defends against disease and may select against physiological resistance (pages 1741–1750)

      Amanda K. Gibson, Elsa Petit, Jorge Mena-Ali, Bengt Oxelman and Michael E. Hood

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.583

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      Anther-smut disease is absent from annual plant species in nature. The current study demonstrates that this distribution is not due to intrinsic physiological resistance in annuals, which appear more susceptible than natural perennial hosts. Moreover, the study shows that such naive annual species may vary in susceptibility, which incurs costs for the less susceptible genotypes that are similar to observation in natural perennial hosts. This image shows experimentally-produced anther-smut disease on the naive, annual species, Silene colorata.

    28. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Employing 454 amplicon pyrosequencing to reveal intragenomic divergence in the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region in fungi (pages 1751–1764)

      Daniel L. Lindner, Tor Carlsen, R. Henrik Nilsson, Marie Davey, Trond Schumacher and Håvard Kauserud

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.586

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      454 amplicon pyrosequencing was used to survey intragenomic divergence in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA region of fungi, a region of DNA that is widely used in phylogenetics and serves as a “DNA barcode.” A large number of studies are utilizing next-generation sequencing of the ITS region to estimate species richness in environmental samples, and intragenomic variation could significantly affect the conclusions of these studies. We discovered significant variation in a small number of fungal species (3–5%), suggesting that intragenomic variability is rare but widespread in kingdom Fungi and should have a minor impact on species richness estimates of fungi in environmental studies relative to PCR and/or pyrosequencing error.

    29. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Role of evolutionary and ecological factors in the reproductive success and the spatial genetic structure of the temperate gorgonian Paramuricea clavata (pages 1765–1779)

      Kenza Mokhtar-Jamaï, Rafel Coma, Jinliang Wang, Frederic Zuberer, Jean-Pierre Féral and Didier Aurelle

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.588

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      In this study, for the first time in a marine invertebrate, we assessed relative individual reproductive success, by conducting larval paternity assignments after a natural spawning event, combined with an analysis of spatial genetic structure (SGS) at short distance, within a population of the red gorgonian Paramuricea clavata. Thirty four percent of the larvae were sired by male colonies surrounding the brooding female colonies. Male success increased with male height and decreased with increasing male to female distance. Our results indicate that limited larval dispersal and complex family structure do not necessarily lead to biparental inbreeding and SGS.

    30. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Patterns of ecological specialization among microbial populations in the Red Sea and diverse oligotrophic marine environments (pages 1780–1797)

      Luke R. Thompson, Chris Field, Tamara Romanuk, David Kamanda Ngugi, Rania Siam, Hamza El Dorry and Ulrich Stingl

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.593

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      Comparing environmental DNA of the most abundant microbial groups in the open ocean, we discovered key ecosystem-specific stress-response adaptations. For example, in the Red Sea, we found adaptations to its high-salinity levels and high solar irradiation. We found that the Red Sea's SAR11 (alphaproteobacteria) population carries more genes for obtaining energy and nutrients from osmolytes, produced by other organisms to survive high salt; and the Red Sea's Prochlorococcus (cyanobacteria) population carries extra genes for repairing UV-damaged DNA.

    31. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      High-resolution prediction of leaf onset date in Japan in the 21st century under the IPCC A1B scenario (pages 1798–1807)

      Mayumi Hadano, Kenlo Nishida Nasahara, Takeshi Motohka, Hibiki Muraoka Noda, Kazutaka Murakami and Masahiro Hosaka

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.575

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      In the end of 21st century, the date of leaf onset of forest trees in Japan will advance 15–26 days. The greatest impact is likely to occur in Hokkaido and the central mountains.

  3. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Reviews
    5. Erratum
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Interactive effects of global climate change and pollution on marine microbes: the way ahead (pages 1808–1818)

      Francisco J. R. C. Coelho, Ana L. Santos, Joana Coimbra, Adelaide Almeida, Ângela Cunha, Daniel F. R. Cleary, Ricardo Calado and Newton C. M. Gomes

      Article first published online: 23 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.565

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      Global climate change has the potential to seriously and adversely affect marine ecosystem functioning. In this review, we highlight the importance of microbial microcosm experiments, coupled with high-resolution molecular biology techniques, to provide a critical experimental framework to start understanding how climate change, anthropogenic pollution and microbiological interactions may affect marine ecosystems in the future.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Two sexes, one genome: the evolutionary dynamics of intralocus sexual conflict (pages 1819–1834)

      Tanya M. Pennell and Edward H. Morrow

      Article first published online: 1 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.540

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Intralocus sexual conflict (IASC) is a form of sexual antagonism that arises when the same genes control the same phenotype in both sexes, but optimal trait values differ for males and females. We consider the maintenance, resolution, and consequences of this evolutionary feud, suggest areas for future research, and draw attention to issues relating to current empirical work.

  4. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Reviews
    5. Erratum
    1. You have full text access to this Open Access content
      Biological invasions: a field synopsis, systematic review, and database of the literature (page 1835)

      Edward Lowry, Emily J. Rollinson, Adam J. Laybourn, Tracy E. Scott, Matthew E. Aiello-Lammens, Sarah M. Gray, James Mickley and Jessica Gurevitch

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.643

      This article corrects:

      Biological invasions: a field synopsis, systematic review, and database of the literature

      Vol. 3, Issue 1, 182–196, Article first published online: 26 FEB 2013

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