You have full text access to this Open Access content

Ecology and Evolution

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 9

September 2013

Volume 3, Issue 9

Pages i–ii, 2783–3194

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Reviews
    5. Erratum
    1. You have full text access to this Open Access content
      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.779

  2. Original Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Reviews
    5. Erratum
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Do elevations in temperature, CO2, and nutrient availability modify belowground carbon gain and root morphology in artificially defoliated silver birch seedlings? (pages 2783–2794)

      Liisa Huttunen, Karita Saravesi, Annamari Markkola and Pekka Niemelä

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.665

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The concurrent effects of climate change and removal of foliage on root carbohydrate dynamics are poorly understood, especially in tree seedlings. We investigated if exposures to different combinations of elevated temperature, CO2, and nutrient availability modify belowground carbon gain in artificially defoliated 1-year-old silver birches (Betula pendula). Our results indicate that only some specific elements of climate change alter belowground carbon gain in this defoliated birch species, and that birches in general are not carbon limited.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      How landscape scale changes affect ecological processes in conservation areas: external factors influence land use by zebra (Equus burchelli) in the Okavango Delta (pages 2795–2805)

      Hattie L. A. Bartlam-Brooks, Mpaphi C. Bonyongo and Stephen Harris

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.676

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study examines space use changes made by zebras in response to landscape variation. We found that zebra's use of space, including home range size, was significantly affected by the size, density, and connectivity of habitat patches as well as the availability of preferred habitats. These results show the sensitivity of some herbivore species to landscape characteristics and in this case illustrate the effect a changing flood regime will have on zebra within the Okavango Delta declines.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Genetic attributes of midwife toad (Alytes obstetricans) populations do not correlate with degree of species decline (pages 2806–2819)

      Ursina Tobler, Trenton W. J. Garner and Benedikt R. Schmidt

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.677

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We quantified the effects of subpopulation loss on genetic structure of declining or stable midwife toad populations. We did not find any signature of decline on genetic structure despite a large enough time scale for such effects to be present. However, we found high genetic differentiation among subpopulations in all populations, suggesting that midwife toad subpopulations function as relatively independent units, and discuss conservation implications of this finding.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Flexible mate choice when mates are rare and time is short (pages 2820–2831)

      Robin M. Tinghitella, Emily G. Weigel, Megan Head and Janette W. Boughman

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.666

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mate choice is dynamic and depends on both extrinsic and intrinsic factors. In this study, we investigate how responses to the social mating environment (extrinsic) change as individuals age (intrinsic). We find that female threespine sticklebacks become more responsive to courtship as they age, and that those experiencing female-biased, but not male-biased, sex ratios relax their mating decisions late in life.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Community patterns of the small riverine benthos within and between two contrasting glacier catchments (pages 2832–2844)

      Ursula Eisendle-Flöckner, Christian D. Jersabek, Martin Kirchmair, Kerstin Hashold and Walter Traunspurger

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.679

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The small benthic biota community (bacteria, fungi, algae, invertebrates such as nematodes and rotifers) in two contrasting glacier catchments were studied. The catchments differ in past and present retreat patterns and thus they offer a model with which to study the relation between riverine changes in glacier catchments and benthic biota patterns.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Understanding the contribution of habitats and regional variation to long-term population trends in tricolored blackbirds (pages 2845–2858)

      Emily E. Graves, Marcel Holyoak, T. Rodd Kelsey and Robert J. Meese

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.681

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We document historical (>100 year) population trends in America's most colonial songbird, and relate regional variation to the frequency of different breeding habitats and trends within those habitats. We find a substantial geographical change in the distribution that was accompanied by changes in the habitats used. The results challenge us to understand within-habitat demography and movements among habitat types.

    7. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Heat stress but not inbreeding affects offensive sperm competitiveness in Callosobruchus maculatus (pages 2859–2866)

      Emile van Lieshout, Joseph L. Tomkins and Leigh W. Simmons

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.667

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stress is known to affect ejaculate traits, but exactly how genetic stress (inbreeding) and environmental stress (heat shock) interact remains poorly understood. Using the beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, we show that pupal heat stress reduces sperm competitiveness while increasing viability. Inbreeding had neither main nor interactive effects, showing that not all stressors cause similar decreases in function.

    8. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Landscape heterogeneity drives intra-population niche variation and reproduction in an arctic top predator (pages 2867–2879)

      Vincent L'Hérault, Alastair Franke, Nicolas Lecomte, Adam Alogut and Joël Bêty

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.675

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Intra-population variability in resource use by consumer species has been recently associated with landscape heterogeneity. By combining data on isotopic niche with a long-term data set on reproduction, we documented an effect of the heterogeneous breeding environments on the diet and the reproductive output of a top predator, the peregrine falcon. Within a terrestrial/marine gradient of habitat, peregrine falcons predominantly consumed terrestrial prey, but individuals nesting at the marine end produced fewer young than their conspecifics nesting at the terrestrial end.

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The influence of landscape matrix on isolated patch use by wide-ranging animals: conservation lessons for woodland caribou (pages 2880–2891)

      Rémi Lesmerises, Jean-Pierre Ouellet, Claude Dussault and Martin-Hugues St-Laurent

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.695

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We propose an approach that combines the influence of landscape matrices with the intrinsic attributes of remaining habitat patches on the space use behaviour of woodland caribou using GPS telemetry surveys conducted on 51 females. We found that residual forest patch size and composition influence caribou occurrence and intensity of use within a patch, and that both the presence of anthropogenic disturbances and undisturbed areas in the surrounding environment influenced caribou use of residual forest patches. Woodland caribou clearly need large residual forest patches, embedded in a relatively undisturbed matrix, to achieve low densities as an antipredator strategy (spacing out behaviour).

    10. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Genetic structure, spatial organization, and dispersal in two populations of bat-eared foxes (pages 2892–2902)

      Jan F. Kamler, Melissa M. Gray, Annie Oh and David W. Macdonald

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.683

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We incorporated radio-telemetry data with genetic analysis of bat-eared foxes (Otocyon megalotis) from individuals in 32 different groups to examine relatedness and spatial organization in two populations in South Africa that differed in density, home-range sizes, and group sizes. Our results indicated that genetic structure within populations of bat-eared foxes was gender biased, and was interrelated to density and group sizes, as well as sex-biases in philopatry and dispersal distances. We conclude that a combination of male-biased dispersal rates, adult dispersals, and sex-biased dispersal distances likely helped to facilitate inbreeding avoidance in this evolutionarily unique species of Candiae.

    11. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Effective sociodemographic population assessment of elusive species in ecology and conservation management (pages 2903–2916)

      Josephine S. Head, Christophe Boesch, Martha M. Robbins, Luisa I. Rabanal, Loïc Makaga and Hjalmar S. Kühl

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.670

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Conservation managers are urgently searching for improved methods to evaluate the effectiveness of implemented conservation activities, and in this study we demonstrate the potential and effectiveness of combining remote video trapping, spatially explicit capture–recapture (SECR) techniques and other methods to facilitate comprehensive population assessment of elusive species. We applied this approach to chimpanzees Pan troglodytes troglodytes, gorillas Gorilla gorilla gorilla, and forest elephants Loxodonta cyclotis in Loango National Park, Gabon, and estimated a density of 1.72, 1.2, and 1.37 individuals per km2, respectively. In addition, we were able to infer group size and ranging patterns of the three species, and investigate intersexual variation in home range size, highlighting the potential and effectiveness of this approach in conducting detailed population assessments that go far beyond documenting species diversity patterns or estimating single species population size.

    12. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Climate change and plant dispersal along corridors in fragmented landscapes of Mesoamerica (pages 2917–2932)

      Pablo A. Imbach, Bruno Locatelli, Luis G. Molina, Philippe Ciais and Paul W. Leadley

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.672

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We assessed the role of biological corridors for plant dispersal under climate change at a regional scale with limited knowledge on species traits (i.e., on tropical ecosystems) and uncertain future climate scenarios. For this purpose, we developed a cellular automata model to simulate plant dispersal and used the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor (MBC) as a test base. We found that important biological corridors have relatively large areas and gradients in altitude, latitude, and longitude and that only the fastest species can keep up with the expected change in climate. We conclude that the spatial assessment of the vulnerability of protected areas and the role of corridors in facilitating dispersal can help conservation planning under a changing climate.

    13. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Gamete production patterns, ploidy, and population genetics reveal evolutionary significant units in hybrid water frogs (Pelophylax esculentus) (pages 2933–2946)

      Nicolas B. M. Pruvost, Alexandra Hoffmann and Heinz-Ulrich Reyer

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.687

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Amplexus between a Pelophylax ridibundus female and a P. lessonae male (on top). Such primary hybridization will result in hybrid P. esculentus offspring. Photo: N.B.M Pruvost.

    14. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Are heat waves susceptible to mitigate the expansion of a species progressing with global warming? (pages 2947–2957)

      Christelle Robinet, Jérôme Rousselet, Patrick Pineau, Florie Miard and Alain Roques

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.690

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Climatic anomalies could potentially mitigate the average warming effects. Although the pine processionary moth is extending its distribution in response to global warming, the 2003 heatwave killed directly or indirectly young larvae within its expansion range.

    15. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Functional traits, the phylogeny of function, and ecosystem service vulnerability (pages 2958–2975)

      Sandra Díaz, Andy Purvis, Johannes H. C. Cornelissen, Georgina M. Mace, Michael J. Donoghue, Robert M. Ewers, Pedro Jordano and William D. Pearse

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.601

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We offer a new synthesis integrating in a single, coherent framework the evolution of organismal traits, ecosystem process and services, and their security or vulnerability in the face of specific kinds of environmental change. Our risk assessment integrates ecological and evolutionary perspectives on functional traits to determine species’ effects on ecosystems and their tolerance of different environmental threats. Applying the assessment to five case studies, we show that the security of ecosystem services depends on how effects and tolerances of organisms – which both depend on combinations of functional traits – correlate across species and how they are arranged on the phylogenetic tree. Our framework highlights the importance of phylogenetic redundancy in species’ effects and the risks of strong phylogenetic patterning in species’ tolerances, and suggests a concrete, new research agenda at the interface of evolutionary biology and ecosystem ecology.

    16. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Host sex-specific parasites in a functionally dioecious fig: a preference way of adaptation to their hosts (pages 2976–2984)

      Qi Wang, Zi-Feng Jiang, Ning-xin Wang, Li-ming Niu, Zi Li and Da-Wei Huang

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.682

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It describes empirical research into fig wasp divergence, in functionally dioecious Ficus species, two nonsibling Apocryptophagus species showed sex-specific parasite.

    17. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Coevolutionary analyses of the relationships between piroplasmids and their hard tick hosts (pages 2985–2993)

      Huitian Gou, Guiquan Guan, Aihong Liu, Miling Ma, Ze Chen, Zhijie Liu, Qiaoyun Ren, Youquan Li, Jifei Yang, Hong Yin and Jianxun Luo

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.685

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We analyses the evolutionary relationships between piroplasmids and their hard tick hosts by calculated the molecular clock and conducted phylogenetic tree of both groups.

    18. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Critical indirect effects of climate change on sub-Antarctic ecosystem functioning (pages 2994–3004)

      E. Louise Allan, P. William Froneman, Jonathan V. Durgadoo, Christopher D. McQuaid, Isabelle J. Ansorge and Nicole B. Richoux

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.678

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We have found a long-term southward migration of the sub-Antarctic Front is coupled with a long-term depletion of δ13C signatures in the inshore benthos, likely reflecting a long-term decline in phytoplankton productivity at the sub-Antarctic Prince Edward Islands. Furthermore, a decline in the abundances of inshore-feeding top predators at these islands indicates changes in prey availability, which may have resulted indirectly through the effects of regional climate change on the marine ecosystem at these islands.

    19. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Y-chromosome evidence supports asymmetric dog introgression into eastern coyotes (pages 3005–3020)

      Tyler J. Wheeldon, Linda Y. Rutledge, Brent R. Patterson, Bradley N. White and Paul J. Wilson

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.693

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We genetically profiled a sample of eastern coyotes and dogs collected from southeastern Ontario, Canada, to assess levels of hybridization between these species and to clarify the evolutionary history of the eastern coyote. We found evidence of Y-chromosome introgression from dogs into eastern coyotes, which we suggest occurred historically during the coyote's eastward range expansion.

    20. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Implications of a temperature increase for host plant range: predictions for a butterfly (pages 3021–3029)

      Hélène Audusseau, Sören Nylin and Niklas Janz

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.696

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A temperature increase is expected to affect an insect's host plant-interactions as well as its number of reproductive cycles. We showed how the performance of a butterfly species (Polygonia c-album) is modified in terms of growth and survival by the combined effects of temperature, host plant use and voltinism. The results suggest that in this species, host range evolution in response to a temperature increase would depend on whether the population undergoes a shift in voltinism.

    21. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Different modes of evolution in males and females generate dichromatism in fairy-wrens (Maluridae) (pages 3030–3046)

      Allison E. Johnson, J. Jordan Price and Stephen Pruett-Jones

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.686

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Illustration of both males and females of five species representative of the Maluridae family showing the range of plumage dimorphism present in the family: (A) Wallace's fairy-wren (Sipodotus wallacii), (B) Southern emu-wren (Stipiturus malachurus), (C) splendid fairy-wren (Malurus splendens), (D) lovely fairy-wren (Malurus amabilis), and (E) white-shouldered fairy-wren (Malurus alboscapulatus). Males are illustrated above females in each species pair.

    22. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Local differentiation amidst extensive allele sharing in Oryza nivara and O. rufipogon (pages 3047–3062)

      Maria Celeste N. Banaticla-Hilario, Ronald G. van den Berg, Nigel Ruaraidh Sackville Hamilton and Kenneth L. McNally

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.689

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We genotyped 119 accessions of Asia Pacific Oryza series Sativae species (Oryza nivara, O. rufipogon Griff., and O. meridionalis) with 29 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and looked into variations within and between species. SSR analyses revealed that (1) O. nivara and O. rufipogon share similarities across their distribution but exhibit local scale differentiation, (2) there are eight genetically distinct populations groups that correspond to geographic populations within the three taxa, and (3) O. meridionalis and the Nepalese O. nivara seemed diverged from all the population groups of the series, whereas the Australasian O. rufipogon appeared distinct from the rest of the species.

    23. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Nonconsumptive effects in a multiple predator system reduce the foraging efficiency of a keystone predator (pages 3063–3072)

      Jon M. Davenport and David R. Chalcraft

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.691

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Larval dragonflies evoke a strong non-consumptive effect (NCE) on tadpole behavior. This strong NCE leads to a change in the consumptive effect (CE) of a keystone predator species, broken-striped newts.

    24. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Local density and group size interacts with age and sex to determine direction and rate of social dispersal in a polygynous mammal (pages 3073–3082)

      Paula H. Marjamäki, Adrienne L. Contasti, Tim N. Coulson and Philip D. McLoughlin

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.694

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We use data from an individual-based study of feral horses (Sable Island, Canada) to demonstrate that dispersal and the direction of density-dependence is not fixed but varies according to the age and sex of an individual but also how they might perceive density effects (local density vs. group size). The overall positive density-dependent response is likely to influence the population dynamics of Sable Island horses, while scale effects and interactions of density-dependent and age- and sex-biased dispersal may have both ecological and evolutionary consequences through effects on resource and mate competition.

    25. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Speciation patterns and processes in the zooplankton of the ancient lakes of Sulawesi Island, Indonesia (pages 3083–3094)

      James J. Vaillant, Dan G. Bock, G. Douglas Haffner and Melania E. Cristescu

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.697

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Studies of ancient lake fauna have provided important insights about speciation patterns and processes of organisms in heterogeneous benthic environments, however the evolutionary forces responsible for speciation in the relatively homogenous planktonic environment remain largely unexplored. In this study, we investigate mechanisms of speciation in zooplankton using the freshwater diaptomids of the ancient lakes of Sulawesi, Indonesia as a model system. Overall, our results support the conclusion that colonization order is crucial at the large, island scale, while at local and intralacustrine scales, speciation processes are regulated by gene flow among genetically differentiated and locally adapted populations.

    26. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Effects of experimental warming on stomatal traits in leaves of maize (Zea may L.) (pages 3095–3111)

      Yunpu Zheng, Ming Xu, Ruixing Hou, Ruichang Shen, Shuai Qiu and Zhu Ouyang

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.674

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Warming had little effect on stomatal density, but significantly increased stomatal index due to the reduction in the number of epidermal cells under the warming treatment. Warming decreased stomatal aperture length and increased stomatal aperture width. Warming changed the stomatal spatial distribution pattern.

    27. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      How are plant and fungal communities linked to each other in belowground ecosystems? A massively parallel pyrosequencing analysis of the association specificity of root-associated fungi and their host plants (pages 3112–3124)

      Hirokazu Toju, Hirotoshi Sato, Satoshi Yamamoto, Kohmei Kadowaki, Akifumi S. Tanabe, Shigenobu Yazawa, Osamu Nishimura and Kiyokazu Agata

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.706

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The number of the fungal taxa that are shared between each pair of plant species in a warm-temperate secondary forest in Japan.

    28. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Supporting crop pollinators with floral resources: network-based phenological matching (pages 3125–3140)

      Laura Russo, Nelson DeBarros, Suann Yang, Katriona Shea and David Mortensen

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.703

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An example of an observed visitation event between a sweat bee (Agapostemon virescens) and one of the floral provisioning plant species (Echinacea purpurea). Photo by L. R.

    29. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Generalized additive mixed models for disentangling long-term trends, local anomalies, and seasonality in fruit tree phenology (pages 3141–3151)

      Leo Polansky and Martha M. Robbins

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.707

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We apply generalized additive mixed models for the analysis for tropical fruiting tree phenology. A wide range of patterns are revealed, and the observation of an anomalous high production year is supported by quantitative analyses.

    30. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Extensive sampling of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in the Northwest Passage (Canadian Arctic Archipelago) reveals population differentiation across multiple spatial and temporal scales (pages 3152–3165)

      Leonardo Campagna, Peter J. Van Coeverden de Groot, Brenda L. Saunders, Stephen N. Atkinson, Diana S. Weber, Markus G. Dyck, Peter T. Boag and Stephen C. Lougheed

      Article first published online: 3 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.662

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We use DNA microsatellites and mitochondrial control region sequences to quantify genetic differentiation, estimate gene flow, and infer population history of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from across the center of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Our findings support the designation of two conservation units and provide a striking example of how nuclear DNA and mtDNA capture different aspects of a species demographic history. Picture by Brenda Saunders.

    31. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Ecomorphological disparity in an adaptive radiation: opercular bone shape and stable isotopes in Antarctic icefishes (pages 3166–3182)

      Laura A. B. Wilson, Marco Colombo, Reinhold Hanel, Walter Salzburger and Marcelo R. Sánchez-Villagra

      Article first published online: 5 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.708

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study analyses the relationship between ecological and morphological disparity in the adaptive radiation of Antarctic notothenioid fish using patterns of opercle bone shape evolution. We identify axes of shape change, particularly a widening of the opercle bone, that have been recovered in other adaptive radiations (three-spined sticklebacks) and a trend in opercle shape along the benthic-pelagic axis, underlining the importance of this axis for diversification in notothenioids. Consistent with mathematical predictions of an adaptive radiation model, opercle shape and size disparity is higher than would be expected under neutral evolution.

  3. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Reviews
    5. Erratum
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Phenological overlap of interacting species in a changing climate: an assessment of available approaches (pages 3183–3193)

      Nicole E. Rafferty, Paul J. CaraDonna, Laura A. Burkle, Amy M. Iler and Judith L. Bronstein

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.668

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Concern regarding the biological effects of climate change has led to a recent surge in research to understand the consequences of phenological change for species interactions. We synthesize the widely disparate approaches currently being used to investigate shifts in the temporal overlap of interacting species. We weigh the merits and limitations of each approach and survey the recent literature from diverse systems to characterize the types of interactions being studied.

  4. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    4. Reviews
    5. Erratum
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Failed species, innominate forms, and the vain search for species limits: cryptic diversity in dusky salamanders (Desmognathus) of eastern Tennessee (page 3194)

      Stephen G. Tilley, Joseph Bernardo, Laura A. Katz, Lizmarie López, J. Devon Roll, Renée L. Eriksen, Justin Kratovil, Noëlle K. J. Bittner and Keith A. Crandall

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.780

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION