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Ecology and Evolution

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 12

June 2014

Volume 4, Issue 12

Pages i–iii, 2303–2623

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    1. You have full text access to this Open Access content
      Issue Information (pages i–iii)

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.806

  2. Original Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Pollinators visit related plant species across 29 plant–pollinator networks (pages 2303–2315)

      Jana C. Vamosi, Clea M. Moray, Navdeep K. Garcha, Scott A. Chamberlain and Arne Ø. Mooers

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1051

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      Understanding the evolution of specialization in host plant use by pollinators is often complicated by variability in the ecological context of specialization. Flowering communities offer their pollinators varying numbers and proportions of floral resources, and the uniformity observed in these floral resources is, to some degree, due to shared ancestry. Here, we find that pollinators do visit related plant species more so than expected by chance throughout 29 plant–pollinator networks of varying sizes, with “clade specialization” increasing with community size.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Multiple paternity is a shared reproductive strategy in the live-bearing surfperches (Embiotocidae) that may be associated with female fitness (pages 2316–2329)

      John R. LaBrecque, Yvette R. Alva-Campbell, Sophie Archambeault and Karen D. Crow

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1071

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      Surfperch are a unique group of nearshore fishes that give live birth and have been shown to exhibit multiple paternity. For the first time, we show that the basal taxon of surfperch exhibit multiple paternity, using microsatellite analysis, suggesting that this is a shared reproductive tactic among the Embiotocidae. Furthermore, a correlation between mating success and reproductive success, (i.e. a female bateman gradient) is detected for the first time in surfperches.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      What are the benefits of parental care? The importance of parental effects on developmental rate (pages 2330–2351)

      Hope Klug and Michael B. Bonsall

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1083

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      In this manuscript, we summarize four general types of parental care benefits. Care can be beneficial if parents (1) increase offspring survival during the stage in which parents and offspring are associated, (2) improve offspring quality in a way that leads to increased offspring survival and/or reproduction in the future when parents are no longer associated with offspring, (3) directly increase offspring reproductive success when parents and offspring remain associated into adulthood. We additionally suggest and find that parental control over offspring developmental rate might represent a substantial, yet underappreciated, benefit of care.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Red mangrove life history variables along latitudinal and anthropogenic stress gradients (pages 2352–2359)

      C. Edward Proffitt and Steven Travis

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1095

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      Increasing freeze frequency increases the numbers of reproducing red mangrove trees in a stand, while increasing anthropogenic stress decreases reproduction. Increasing cold stress and reproduction increase percent outcrossing which may be important in mangroves colonizing novel habitats.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Survival and growth patterns of white spruce (Picea glauca [Moench] Voss) rangewide provenances and their implications for climate change adaptation (pages 2360–2374)

      Pengxin Lu, William H. Parker, Marilyn Cherry, Steve Colombo, William C. Parker, Rongzhou Man and Ngaire Roubal

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1100

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      This study reveals patterns of natural genetic variation in adaptation and growth among white spruce (Picea glauca [Moench] Voss) populations across North America. It also examines the response of populations of different geographic origins to varying climatic conditions and evaluates the potential risks and benefits of using intraspecific assisted migration to enhance forest adaptation to climate change.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Big catch, little sharks: Insight into Peruvian small-scale longline fisheries (pages 2375–2383)

      Philip D. Doherty, Joanna Alfaro-Shigueto, David J. Hodgson, Jeffrey C. Mangel, Matthew J. Witt and Brendan J. Godley

      Version of Record online: 14 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1104

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      Analysis of small-scale longline shark fisheries in Peru shows dominance of small individuals under the legally set minimum landing size. Results shown suggest this fishery likely has an unsustainable future.

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      Insect-induced tree mortality of boreal forests in eastern Canada under a changing climate (pages 2384–2394)

      Xiongqing Zhang, Yuancai Lei, Zhihai Ma, Dan Kneeshaw and Changhui Peng

      Version of Record online: 16 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.988

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      Forest insects are major disturbances inducing tree mortality in eastern coniferous (or fir-spruce) forests in eastern North America. The results showed that forest insects significantly increased tree mortality. We also found that annual tree mortality increased significantly with the annual climate moisture index (CMI), decreased significantly with annual minimum temperature (Tmin), annual mean temperature (Tmean) and the number of degree days below 0°C (DD0), which was inconsistent with previous studies.

    8. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Abiotic stress QTL in lettuce crop–wild hybrids: comparing greenhouse and field experiments (pages 2395–2409)

      Yorike Hartman, Danny A. P. Hooftman, Brigitte Uwimana, M. Eric Schranz, Clemens C. M. van de Wiel, Marinus J. M. Smulders, Richard G. F. Visser, Richard W. Michelmore and Peter H. van Tienderen

      Version of Record online: 17 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1060

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      We report on a series of abiotic stress QTL studies from greenhouse and field experiments asking whether they could be used to predict the fate of a transgene after a hybridization event. The main messages of this manuscript include (i) competition is an important selective agent that would need more attention in risk assessment; (ii) among experimental variation is large: unavoidable differences in experimental setup can cause a large variation in the QTL results, making predicting genomic selection patterns for specific abiotic stresses challenging.

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Maximizing species conservation in continental Ecuador: a case of systematic conservation planning for biodiverse regions (pages 2410–2422)

      Janeth Lessmann, Jesús Muñoz and Elisa Bonaccorso

      Version of Record online: 17 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1102

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      Identification of potential areas for species conservation in continental Ecuador, using species distribution models and a reserve selection algorithm.

    10. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      High-resolution food webs based on nitrogen isotopic composition of amino acids (pages 2423–2449)

      Yoshito Chikaraishi, Shawn A. Steffan, Nanako O. Ogawa, Naoto F. Ishikawa, Yoko Sasaki, Masashi Tsuchiya and Naohiko Ohkouchi

      Version of Record online: 17 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1103

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      Stable nitrogen isotope analysis of amino acids has been employed as a relatively new method with the high potential for accurate and precise estimates of the trophic position of organisms. In the present study, we applied this method for multiple species collected from coastal marine (a stony shore) and terrestrial (a fruit farm) environments. Results clearly demonstrate that based on the observed trophic position of multiple species, we are able to present a highly resolved image of the trophic structure of these food webs.

    11. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Population genetic structure, genetic diversity, and natural history of the South American species of Nothofagus subgenus Lophozonia (Nothofagaceae) inferred from nuclear microsatellite data (pages 2450–2471)

      Rodrigo Vergara, Matthew A. Gitzendanner, Douglas E. Soltis and Pamela S. Soltis

      Version of Record online: 18 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1108

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      This figure shows the genetic structure of (A) Nothofagus obliqua, (B) N. alpina, and (C) N. glauca as inferred from microsatellite data using Structure 2.3.2. The analysis revealed three geographically explicit groups in N. obliqua following a latitudinal pattern, but very diffused groups in N. alpina and N. glauca with no latitudinal patterns.

    12. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Identifying species of moths (Lepidoptera) from Baihua Mountain, Beijing, China, using DNA barcodes (pages 2472–2487)

      Xiao F. Liu, Cong H. Yang, Hui L. Han, Robert D. Ward and Ai-bing Zhang

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1110

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      Phylogenetic trees (N-J) of 58 Arctiidae moth specimens. Clades with different colors indicate different species. Numbers above branches indicate bootstrap values (100 not shown).

    13. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Unique mitochondrial DNA lineages in Irish stickleback populations: cryptic refugium or rapid recolonization? (pages 2488–2504)

      Mark Ravinet, Chris Harrod, Christophe Eizaguirre and Paulo A. Prodöhl

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.853

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      Previous studies have revealed that anadromous fish populations in Ireland harbor unique genetic diversity, suggesting a refugium close to the Irish landmass may have existed during the last glacial. We collected three-spined stickleback populations across Britain and Ireland and used coalescent simulations and approximate Bayesian computation to answer this question.

    14. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The efficiency of indicator groups for the conservation of amphibians in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest (pages 2505–2514)

      Felipe Siqueira Campos, Joaquim Trindade-Filho, Daniel Brito, Gustavo A. Llorente and Mirco Solé

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1073

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      The quantification of the spatial congruence between species richness and complementarity among different taxonomic groups is a fundamental step to identify potential indicator groups. Using a constructive approach, the main purposes of this study were to evaluate the performance and efficiency of eight potential indicator groups representing amphibian diversity in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

    15. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Is isolation by adaptation driving genetic divergence among proximate Dolly Varden char populations? (pages 2515–2532)

      Morgan H. Bond, Penelope A. Crane, Wesley A. Larson and Tom P. Quinn

      Version of Record online: 22 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1113

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      Collections of Dolly Varden fry from 13 streams throughout a watershed in Southwestern Alaska revealed low levels of population structure among streams emptying into freshwater. However, much stronger genetic differentiation was detected between those streams emptying into freshwater and streams flowing immediately into estuarine environments. This fine-scale reproductive isolation without any physical barriers to migration is likely driven by differences in selection pressures across freshwater and estuarine environments.

    16. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Intraspecific plant–soil feedback and intraspecific overyielding in Arabidopsis thaliana (pages 2533–2545)

      Alexandra R. Bukowski and Jana S. Petermann

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1077

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      We investigate intraspecific trait variation, as well as intraspecific plant–soil feedback as a potential coexistence mechanism and ecosystem functioning in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that plant–soil feedback indeed operates at intraspecific level, with accessions showing strong trait-independent differences in feedback strength and direction. Furthermore, positive intraspecific diversity effects emerged.

    17. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Speciation, population structure, and demographic history of the Mojave Fringe-toed Lizard (Uma scoparia), a species of conservation concern (pages 2546–2562)

      Andrew D. Gottscho, Sharyn B. Marks and W. Bryan Jennings

      Version of Record online: 23 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1111

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      We tested hypotheses regarding the timing and mode of speciation, population structure, and demographic history of the Mojave Fringe-toed Lizard (Uma scoparia), a sand dune specialist endemic to the Mojave Desert of California and Arizona. Using a coalescent hypothesis testing approach, we estimated that U. scoparia diverged from U. notata in the Pleistocene epoch without significant gene flow. We reject the Neogene vicariance hypothesis for the speciation of U. scoparia and define this species as a single evolutionarily significant unit for conservation purposes.

    18. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Observer aging and long-term avian survey data quality (pages 2563–2576)

      Robert G. Farmer, Marty L. Leonard, Joanna E. Mills Flemming and Sean C. Anderson

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1101

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      Broad-scale, long-term bird population surveys often collect data from single observers visiting a site annually for many years. During this time, the observers may experience aging-related physiological changes that can affect their ability to detect birds. In this research, we find evidence for such aging effects and their potential for introducing negative biases to long-term bird population trend estimates.

    19. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Reol: R interface to the Encyclopedia of Life (pages 2577–2583)

      Barbara L. Banbury and Brian C. O'Meara

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1109

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      Encyclopedia of Life is an online resource containing information about hundreds of thousands of species. We introduce an R package to access and assemble this information.

    20. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Geographic selection bias of occurrence data influences transferability of invasive Hydrilla verticillata distribution models (pages 2584–2593)

      Matthew A. Barnes, Christopher L. Jerde, Marion E. Wittmann, W. Lindsay Chadderton, Jianqing Ding, Jialiang Zhang, Matthew Purcell, Milan Budhathoki and David M. Lodge

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1120

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      We provide updated projection of potentially invasible habitat of the notorious global invasive plant Hydrilla verticillata in North America and illustrate several broadly applicable lessons about species distribution modeling in the process. Specifically, we use Maxent to demonstrate that biases in occurrence records based on political boundaries influence the predictions of species distribution models.

    21. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Heterozygosity–fitness correlations in a wild mammal population: accounting for parental and environmental effects (pages 2594–2609)

      Geetha Annavi, Christopher Newman, Christina D. Buesching, David W. Macdonald, Terry Burke and Hannah L. Dugdale

      Version of Record online: 27 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1112

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      Badgers with more heterozygous fathers had higher first-year survival, but only in wetter summers; there was no relationship with individual or maternal heterozygosity. Paternal HFCs were due to general rather than local heterozygosity effects on first-year survival probability, and g2 indicated that our markers had power to detect inbreeding. We emphasize the importance of assessing how environmental stressors can influence the magnitude and direction of HFCs and of considering how parental genetic diversity can affect fitness-related traits, which could play an important role in the evolution of mate choice.

    22. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Experimental evidence for the immediate impact of fertilization and irrigation upon the plant and invertebrate communities of mountain grasslands (pages 2610–2623)

      Aline Andrey, Jean-Yves Humbert, Claire Pernollet and Raphaël Arlettaz

      Version of Record online: 27 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1118

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      Montane and subalpine hay meadow ecological communities respond very rapidly to an intensification of management practices, with positive effects on plant species richness, vegetation structure, hay production, and arthropod abundance and biomass. Vegetation structure is likely to be the key factor limiting arthropod abundance and biomass.

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