SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • Angilletta, M. J., L. G. Montgomery, and Y. L. Werner. 1999. Temperature preference in geckos: diel variation in juveniles and adults. Herpetologica 55:212222.
  • Angilletta, M. J. Jr, P. H. Niewiarowski, and C. A. Navas. 2002. The evolution of thermal physiology in ectotherms. J. Therm. Biol. 27:249268.
  • Angilletta, M. J. Jr, A. F. Bennett, H. Guderley, C. A. Navas, F. Seebacher, and R. S. Wilson. 2006. Coadaptation: a unifying principle in evolutionary thermal biology. Physiol. Biochem. Zool. 79:282294.
  • Autumn, K., and D. F. De Nardo. 1995. Behavioral thermoregulation increases growth rate in a nocturnal lizard. J. Herp. 29:157162.
  • Bennett, A. F. 1980. The thermal dependence of lizard behaviour. Anim. Behav. 28:752762.
  • Beuchat, C. A. 1988. Temperature effects during gestation in a viviparous lizard. J. Therm. Biol. 13:135142.
  • Bogert, C. M. 1949. Thermoregulation in reptiles, a factor in evolution. Evolution 3:195211.
  • Bogert, C. M. 1981. Investigations in the field and laboratory of behavioral thermoregulation in an iguanid lizard. Pp. 90102. P.E. P. Deraniyagala commemoration volume. Lake House Investments, Sri Lanka.
  • Bowker, R. G. 1984. Precision of thermoregulation of some African lizards. Physiol. Zool. 57:401412.
  • Brattstrom, B. H. 1965. Body temperatures of reptiles. Am. Midl. Nat. 73:376422.
  • Calsbeek, R., and B. Sinervo. 2004. Within-clutch variation in offspring sex determined by differences in sire body size: cryptic mate choice in the wild. J. Evol. Biol. 17:464470.
  • Calsbeek, R., and B. Sinervo. 2007. Correlational selection on lay date and life-history traits: experimental manipulations of territory and nest site quality. Evolution 61:10711083.
  • Christian, K. A., and B. W. Weavers. 1996. Thermoregulation of monitor lizards in Australia: an evaluation of methods in thermal biology. Ecol. Monogr. 66:139157.
  • Comendant, T., B. Sinervo, E. I. Svensson, and J. Wingfield. 2003. Social competition, corticosterone and survival in female lizard morphs. J. Evol. Biol. 16:948955.
  • Cossins, A. R., and K. Bowler. 1987. Temperature biology of animals. Chapman and Hall, New York.
  • Dewitt, C. B., and R. M. Friedman. 1979. Significance of skewness in ectotherm thermoregulation. Am. Zool. 19:195209.
  • Du, W.-G., M. Elphick, and R. Shine. 2010. Thermal regimes during incubation do not affect mean selected temperatures of hatchling lizards (Bassiana duperreyi, Scincidae). J. Therm. Biol. 35:4751.
  • Ellis, D. J., B. T. Firth, and I. Belan. 2008. Interseasonal variation in the circadian rhythms of locomotor activity and temperature selection in sleepy lizards, Tiliqua rugosa. J. Comp. Physiol. A 194:701712.
  • Falconer, D. S. 1981. Introduction to quantitative genetics. 2nd ed. Longman Publishing Group, Longman, London.
  • Falconer, D. S., and T. F. C. Mackay. 1996. Introduction to quantitative genetics. Longman, New York, NY.
  • Firth, B. T., and I. Belan. 1998. Daily and seasonal rhythms in selected body temperatures in the Australian lizard Tiliqua rugosa (Scincidae): field and laboratory observations. Physiol. Zool. 71:303311.
  • Forsman, A., J. Ahnesjo, S. Caesar, and M. Karlsson. 2008. A model of ecological and evolutionary consequences of color polymorphism. Ecology 89:3440.
  • Fry, J. D. 2004. Estimation of genetic variances and covariances by restricted maximum likelihood using PROC MIXED. Pp. 1119 in A. R. Saxton, ed. Genetic analysis of complex traits using SAS®. SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC.
  • Gans, C., and F. H. Pough. 1982. Physiological ecology: its debt to reptilian studies, its value to students of reptiles. Pp. 111 in C. Gans and F. H. Pough, eds. Biology of reptilia vol 12 physiology C physiological ecology. Academic Press, London.
  • Gienapp, P., C. Teplitsky, J. S. Alho, J. A. Mills, and J. Merila. 2008. Climate change and evolution: disentangling environmental and genetic responses. Mol. Ecol. 17:167178.
  • Gil, M. J., F. Guerrero, and V. Perez-Mellado. 1994. Diel vari-ation in preferred body temperatures of the Moorish gecko Tarentola mauritanica during summer. Herpetol. J. 4:5659.
  • Grant, B. W., and A. E. Dunham. 1988. Thermally imposed time constraints on the activity of the desert lizard Sceloporus Merriami. Ecology 69:167176.
  • Hirth, H. F., and A. C. King. 1969. Body temperatures of snakes in different seasons. J. Herp. 3:101102.
  • Hoffmann, A. A., and C. M. Sgro. 2011. Climate change and evolutionary adaptation. Nature 470:479485.
  • Huey, R. B., and D. Berrigan. 2001. Temperature, demography, and ectotherm fitness. Am. Nat. 158:204210.
  • Huey, R. B., and E. R. Pianka. 2007. Lizard thermal biology: do genders differ? Am. Nat. 170:473478.
  • Huey, R. B., and M. Slatkin. 1976. Costs and benefits of lizard thermoregulation. Q. Rev. Biol. 51:363384.
  • Huey, R. B., M. R. Kearney, A. Krockenberger, J. A. M. Holtum, M. Jess, and S. E. Williams. 2012. Predicting organismal vulnerability to climate warming: roles of behaviour, physiology and adaptation. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B Biol. Sci. 367:16651679.
  • Hutchison, V. H. 1979. The concept of critical thermal maximum. Am. J. Physiol. 237:R367R368.
  • Ibargüengoytía, N. R. 2005. Field, selected body temperature and thermal tolerance of the syntopic lizards Phymaturus patagonicus and Liolaemus elongatus (Iguania: Liolaemidae). J. Arid Environ. 62:435448.
  • IPCC. 2007. Climate change 2007: the physical science basis. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.
  • SAS Institute. 2010. JMP 9.0. SAS Institute, Inc, Cary, NC.
  • Kearney, M., R. Shine, and W. P. Porter. 2009. The potential for behavioral thermoregulation to buffer “cold-blooded” animals against climate warming. PNAS 106:38353840.
  • Kingsolver, J. G., K. R. Massie, G. J. Ragland, and M. H. Smith. 2007. Rapid population divergence in thermal reaction norms for an invading species: breaking the temperature-size rule. J. Evol. Biol. 20:892900.
  • Kirkpatrick, M., and R. Lande. 1989. The evolution of maternal characters. Evolution 43:485503.
  • Lailvaux, S. P., and D. J. Irschick. 2007. Effects of temperature and sex on jump performance and biomechanics in the lizard Anolis carolinensis. Funct. Ecol. 21:534543.
  • Lailvaux, S. P., G. J. Alexander, and M. J. Whiting. 2003. Sex-based differences and similarities in locomotor performance, thermal preferences, and escape behaviour in the lizard Platysaurus intermedius wilhelmi. Physiol. Biochem. Zool. 76:511521.
  • Lancaster, L. T., A. G. McAdam, J. C. Wingfield, and B. R. Sinervo. 2007. Adaptive social and maternal induction of antipredator dorsal patterns in a lizard with alternative social strategies. Ecol. Lett. 10:798808.
  • Lancaster, L. T., A. G. McAdam, and B. R. Sinervo. 2010. Maternal adjustment of egg size organizes alternative escape behaviors, promoting phenotypic adaptive integration. Evolution 64:16071621.
  • Licht, P. 1966. Reproduction in lizards: influence of temperature on photoperiodism in testicular recrudescence. Science 154:16681670.
  • Licht, P. 1967a. Environmental control of annual testicular cycles in the lizard Anolis carolinensis. I. Interaction of light and temperature in the initiation of testicular recrudescence. J. Expt. Zool. 165:505516.
  • Licht, P. 1967b. Environmental control of annual testicular cycles in the lizard Anolis carolinensis. II. Seasonal variations in the effects of photoperiod and temperature on testicular recrudescence. J. Expt. Zool. 166:243253.
  • Licht, P. 1973a. Influence of temperature and photoperiod on the annual ovarian cycle in the lizard Anolis carolinensis. Copeia 1973:465472.
  • Licht, P. 1973b. Environmental influences on the testis cycles of the lizards Dipsosaurus dorsalis and Xantusia vigilis. Comp. Biochem. Physiol. Part A 45:720.
  • Linhart, Y. B., and M. C. Grant. 1996. Evolutioanry significance of local genetic differentiation in plants. Annu. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 27:237277.
  • Marshall, J. D., and T. Uller. 2007. When is a maternal effect adaptive? Oikos 116:19571963.
  • Martin, T. L., and R. B. Huey. 2008. Why “suboptimal” is optimal: Jensen's inequality and ectotherm thermal preferences. Am. Nat. 171:E102E118.
  • Mayhew, W. W. 1963. Temperature preferences of Sceloporus orcutti. Herpetologica 18:217233.
  • Moritz, C., G. Langham, M. Kearney, A. Krockenberger, J. VanDerWal, and S. Williams. 2012. Integrating phylogeography and physiology reveals divergence of thermal traits between central and peripheral lineages of tropical rainforest lizards. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B Biol. Sci. 367:16801687.
  • Mousseau, T. A., and C. W. Fox. 1998. Maternal effects as adaptations. Oxford University Press, Oxford, New York.
  • Paranjpe, D. A., R. D. Cooper, A. Patten, and B. Sinervo. 2012. Measuring thermal profile of reptiles in laboratory and field. Pp. 460462 in A. J. Spink, F. Greico, O. E. Krips, L. W. S. Loijens, L. P. J. J. Noldus and P. H. Zimmerman, eds. Proceedings of measuring behavior 2012. Utrecht, The Netherlands.
  • Parker, W. S., and E. R. Pianka. 1975. Comparative ecology of populations of the lizard Uta stansburiana. Copiea 1975:615632.
  • Parmesan, C. 2006. Ecological and evolutionary responses to recent climate change. Annu. Rev. Ecol. Evol. Syst. 37:637669.
  • Patterson, J. W., and P. M. C. Davies. 1978. Preferred body temperature: seasonal and sexual differences in the lizard Lacerta vivipara. J. Therm. Biol. 3:3941.
  • Pentecost, E. D. 1974. Behavior of Eumeces laticeps exposed to a thermal gradient. J. Herp. 8:169173.
  • Peterson, C. R., A. R. Gibson, and M. E. Dorcas. 1993. Snake thermal ecology: the causes and consequences of body-temperature variation. Pp. 241314 in R. A. Seigel and J. T. Collins, eds. Snakes: ecology and behavior. McGraw-Hill, New York, NY.
  • Pough, F. H., and C. Gans. 1982. The vocabulary of reptilian thermoregulation. Pp. 1723 in C. Gans and F. H. Pough, eds. Biology of reptilia vol 12 physiology C physiological ecology. Academic Press, London.
  • Refinetti, R., and S. J. Susalka. 1997. Circadian rhythm of temperature selection in a nocturnal lizard. Physiol. Behav. 62:331336.
  • Romanovsky, A. A. 2007. Thermoregulation: some concepts have changed. Functional architecture of the thermoregulatory system. Am. J. Physiol. Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol. 292:R37R46.
  • Sartorius, S. S., J. P. S. do Amaral, R. D. Durtsche, C. M. Deen, and W. I. Lutterschmidt. 2002. Thermoregulatory accuracy, precision, and effectiveness in two sand-dwelling lizards under mild environmental conditions. Can. J. Zool. 80:19661976.
  • Shine, R. 1980. “Costs” of reproduction in reptiles. Oecologia 46:92100.
  • Sievert, L. M., and V. H. Hutchison. 1989. Influences of season, time of day, light and sex on the thermoregulatory behaviour of Crotaphytus collaris. J. Therm. Biol. 14:159165.
  • Sinervo, B. 1990. Evolution of thermal physiology and growth rate between populations of the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis). Oecologia 83:228237.
  • Sinervo, B. 1998. Adaptation of maternal effects in the wild: path analysis of natural variation and experimental tests of causation. Pp. 288306 in Mousseau, T. A. and C. W. Fox, eds. Maternal effects as adaptations. Oxford University Press, Oxford, New York.
  • Sinervo, B., and S. C. Adolph. 1994. Growth plasticity and thermal opportunity in sceloporus lizards. Ecology 75:776790.
  • Sinervo, B., and D. F. DeNardo. 1996. Cost of reproduction in the wild: path analysis of natural selection and experimental tests of causation. Evolution 50:12991313.
  • Sinervo, B., and P. Doughty. 1996. Interactive effects of offspring size and timing of reproduction on offspring reproduction: experimental, maternal, and quantitative genetic aspects. Evolution 50:13141327.
  • Sinervo, B., and K. D. Dunlap. 1995. Thyroxine affects behavioral thermoregulation but not growth rate among populations of the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis). J. Comp. Physiol. B. 164:509517.
  • Sinervo, B., and C. M. Lively. 1996. The rock-paper-scissors game and the evolution of alternative male strategies. Nature 380:240243.
  • Sinervo, B., and A. G. McAdam. 2008. Maturational costs of reproduction due to clutch size and ontogenetic conflict as revealed in the invisible fraction. Proc. R. Soc. B 275:629638.
  • Sinervo, B., and K. R. Zamudio. 2001. The evolution of alternative reproductive strategies: fitness differential, heritability, and genetic correlation between the sexes. J. Hered. 92:198205.
  • Sinervo, B., E. Svensson, and T. Comendant. 2000a. Density cycles and an offspring quantity and quality game driven by natural selection. Nature 406:985988.
  • Sinervo, B., D. B. Miles, W. A. Frankino, M. Klukowski, and D. F. DeNardo. 2000b. Testosterone, endurance, and Darwinian fitness: natural and sexual selection on the physiological bases of alternative male behaviors in side-blotched lizards. Horm. Behav. 38:222233.
  • Sinervo, B., C. Bleay, and C. Adamopoulou. 2001. Social causes of correlational selection and the resolution of a heritable throat color polymorphism in a lizard. Evolution 55:20402052.
  • Sinervo, B., R. Calsbeek, T. Comendant, C. Both, C. Adamopoulou, and J. Clobert. 2006. Genetic and maternal determinants of effective dispersal: the effect of sire genotype and size at birth in side-blotched lizards. Am. Nat. 168:8899.
  • Sinervo, B., F. Méndez-De-La-Cruz, D. B. Miles, B. Heulin, E. Bastiaans, M. V.-S. Cruz, et al. 2010. Erosion of lizard diversity by climate change and altered thermal niches. Science 328:894899.
  • Sokal, R. R., and F. J. Rohlf. 1981. Biometry. 2nd ed. W. H. Freeman, San Francisco.
  • Svensson, E., B. Sinervo, and T. Comendant. 2001. Condition, genotype-by-environment interaction, and correlational selection in lizard life-history morphs. Evolution 55:20532069.
  • Visser, M. E. 2008. Keeping up with the warming world: assessing the rate of adaptation to climate change. Proc. R. Soc. B 275:649659.
  • Wade, M. J. 1998. The evolutionary genetics of maternal effects. Pp. 521 in T. A. Mousseau and C. W. Fox, eds. Maternal effects as adaptations. Oxford University Press, Oxford, New York.
  • Waldschmidt, S., and C. R. Tracy. 1983. Interactions between a lizard and its thermal environment: implications for sprint performance and space utilization in the lizard Uta Stansburiana. Ecology 64:476484.
  • Werner, Y. L. 1990. Do gravid females of oviparous gekkonid lizards maintain elevated body temperatures? Hemidactylus frenatus and Lepidodactylus lugubris on Oahu. Amphib.-Reptil. 11:200204.
  • Werner, Y. L., and A. H. Whitaker. 1978. Observations and comments on the body temperature of some New Zealand reptiles. N.Z. J. Zool. 5:376393.
  • Zamudio, K. R., and B. Sinervo. 2000. Polygyny, mate-guarding, and posthumous fertilization as alternative male mating strategies. PNAS 97:1442714432.