Anti-inflammatory activity of human IgA antibodies and their Fabα fragments: inhibition of IgG-mediated complement activation

Authors


Abstract

The interaction of human IgA antibodies with the classical pathway of complement activation was investigated in a homologous human system, by means of two IgA1 and three IgG1 myeloma proteins having antibody activity against a defined antigen, staphylococcal α-toxin. In a solid-phase antigendependent C3b-binding ELISA system, the monoclonal IgG antibodies were previously shown to activate the classical complement pathway synergistically, resembling polyclonal IgG antibodies, whereas IgA antibodies were unable to activate complement by either pathway. In the present study, IgA antibodies were found to inhibit significantly the activation of complement initiated by antigenbound polyclonal or mixed monoclonal IgG antibodies, in relation to the amount of IgA antibodies applied and bound to antigen. IgA1 myeloma proteins devoid of antigen-binding activity were without effect. Inhibition was independent of the ability of the IgA antibodies to compete against the IgG antibodies in binding to antigen, and was demonstrable with physiological concentrations of antibodies. Similar results were obtained with polyclonal serum IgA having antigen-binding activity. However, the binding of C1q to antigen-complexed IgG was inhibited only by a monoclonal IgA antibody that could compete against one of the three monoclonal IgG antibodies that bound C1q synergistically. This observation implied that at least two mechanisms were involved in the inhibition of C3b fixation. Fabα fragments of monoclonal IgA antibodies, obtained by cleavage with IgA1 protease from Haemophilus influenzae type b, were found to have a similar inhibitory effect on C3b fixation to the intact IgA1 antibodies. This observation supports the hypothesis that IgA1 proteases contribute to the invasive pathogenicity of certain mucosal bacteria, by cleaving secretory IgA1 antibodies to antigen-binding Fabα fragments, which are not only defective in mucosal defense properties, but which also protect the organisms from other immune effector systems, such as complement activation.

Ancillary