Prevention of experimental autoimmune arthritis with a peptide fragment of type II collagen

Authors

  • Grace Ku,

    1. Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles
    2. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jonsson Cancer Center, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles
    3. Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston
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  • Mitchell Kronenberg,

    1. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jonsson Cancer Center, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles
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  • Derek J. Peacock,

    1. Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles
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  • Paul Tempst,

    1. Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston
    Current affiliation:
    1. Program in Molecular Biology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021, USA
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  • Mona Lisa Banquerigo,

    1. Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles
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  • Benjamin S. Braun,

    1. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jonsson Cancer Center, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles
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  • Joseph R. Reeve Jr.,

    1. Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology CURE, Wadsworth YAMC, Los Angeles
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  • Ernest Brahn

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles
    • UCLA School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, 1000 Veteran Avenue, Rm. 32–48, Los Angeles, CA 90024–1670, USA
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Abstract

Collagen arthritis is induced in inbred rats with the injection of native type II collagen. The pathogenesis of this experimental autoimmune disease is T cell dependent. This study demonstrates that collagen-specific Tcells, derived from pathogenic and nonpathogenic rat Tcell lines, both recognize the same peptide epitope. The epitope, consisting of amino acids 58–73 of cyanogen bromide fragment 11 of type II collagen, was as effective as whole collagen in stimulating a panel of collagen-specific rat/mouse Tcell hybridomas. This peptide may, therefore, constitute a dominant epitope for CD4+ rat Tcells in their response to type II collagen. Administration of the peptide to either neonatal or adult rats prevented the subsequent induction of experimental arthritis with whole collagen, demonstrating that the in vivo response to this dominant epitope is, therefore, relevant in the pathogenesis of arthritis. Despite its ability to prevent collagen-induced arthritis, administration of this peptide in incomplete Freund's adjuvant intradermally did not induce disease.

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