Anatomic location defines antigen presentation by dendritic cells to T cells in response to intravenous soluble antigens

Authors

  • Yeonseok Chung,

    1. Laboratory of Immunology, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea
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    • These two authors contributed equally to this work

  • Jae-Hoon Chang,

    1. Laboratory of Immunology, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea
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    • These two authors contributed equally to this work

  • Byung-Seok Kim,

    1. Laboratory of Immunology, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea
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  • Jung-Mi Lee,

    1. Laboratory of Immunology, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea
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  • Ho-Youn Kim,

    1. The Center for Rheumatic Diseases and The Rheumatism Research Center, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea
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  • Chang-Yuil Kang Dr.

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory of Immunology, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea
    • Laboratory of Immunology, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Shillim-9-dong, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151–742, South Korea, Fax: +82-2-885-1373
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Abstract

In the spleen, exogenous antigen is preferentially presented by CD8α+CD11b DC to CD8 T cells and by CD8αCD11b+ DC to CD4 T cells. However, it is not yet clear whether the same rule applies to other secondary lymphoid organs. To address this issue, we first classified secondary lymphoid tissues into three categories based on the expression pattern of CD8α and CD11b in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice: (a) spleen, (b) mesenteric lymph node (MLN) and (c) other peripheral lymph nodes (PLN). We then analyzed the OVA-specific T cell-stimulating capacity of each DC subset after intravenous injection with soluble OVA. Our results show that, regardless of tissue origin, CD8αCD11b+ DC generally present OVA to CD4 T cells, a finding that held true as well for CD8α+CD11b+ DC in PLN. In striking contrast, CD8α+CD11b DC in spleen, CD8αCD11b+ DC in MLN and CD8α+CD11b+ DC in PLN mainly cross-present OVA to CD8 T cells in their respective tissues. Of note, CD8αCD11b+ DC in MLN and CD8α+CD11b+ DC in PLN present OVA to both CD4 T and CD8 T cells. Therefore, the antigen-presenting capacity of each distinct DC subset is determined by its anatomic environment in combination with its surface phenotype.

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