Bioactive compounds in unsaponifiable fraction of oils from unconventional sources

Authors

  • Sylwester Czaplicki,

    Corresponding author
    1. Chair of Food Plant Chemistry and Processing, Faculty of Food Science, University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
    • Chair of Food Plant Chemistry and Processing, Faculty of Food Science, University of Warmia and Mazury, Plac Cieszyński 1, 10-718 Olsztyn, Poland Fax: +48-89-523-34-66
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  • Dorota Ogrodowska,

    1. Chair of Food Plant Chemistry and Processing, Faculty of Food Science, University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
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  • Dorota Derewiaka,

    1. Division of Food Quality Evaluation, Department of Biotechnology, Microbiology and Food Evaluation, Faculty of Food Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland
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  • Małgorzata Tańska,

    1. Chair of Food Plant Chemistry and Processing, Faculty of Food Science, University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
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  • Ryszard Zadernowski

    1. Chair of Food Plant Chemistry and Processing, Faculty of Food Science, University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
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Abstract

The aim of the research was to characterize bioactive components of unsaponifiable fraction of selected unconventional oils. Nine oils were analyzed as far as the content of tocopherols, squalene, phenolic compounds, and sterols were concerned. Tocopherols and squalene were analyzed by HPLC coupled with diode array detector and fluorescent detector (HPLC-DAD-FLD). The content of sterols in oils was determined by GC coupled with MS (GC-MS). The total amount of phenolic compounds in oils was determined by the colorimetric methods using Folin–Ciocalteau phenol reagent. The examined oils were characterized by differentiated amount of particular forms of tocopherols. The oil obtained from the seeds of amaranth was the richest source of squalene (over 52 mg/g oil). The presence of 22 different compounds of sterols were identified, whereas β-sitosterol was found in the largest amount. Total amount of sterols in the oils ranged from 90 (walnut) to 850 mg/100 g (evening primrose). Significant differentiation of total amount of phenolic compounds was observed in the examined oils. Evening primrose oil showed the highest amount of phenolic compounds (679 mg/kg). The presented results prove that plant oils obtained from nonconventional sources are a potential source of bioactive compounds.

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