Get access

Effect of TAG composition on the solid fat content profile, microstructure, and hardness of model fat blends with identical saturated fatty acid content

Authors

  • Veerle De Graef,

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory of Food Technology and Engineering, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Department of Food Safety and Food Quality, Ghent University, Gent, Belgium
    • Laboratory of Food Technology and Engineering, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Department of Food Safety and Food Quality, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Gent, Belgium Fax: +32 9 264 62 18
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jeroen Vereecken,

    1. Laboratory of Food Technology and Engineering, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Department of Food Safety and Food Quality, Ghent University, Gent, Belgium
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kevin W. Smith,

    1. Consultant to Loders Croklaan, Fat Science Consulting Ltd., Bedford, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Krish Bhaggan,

    1. Loders Croklaan B.V., Wormerveer, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Koen Dewettinck

    1. Laboratory of Food Technology and Engineering, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Department of Food Safety and Food Quality, Ghent University, Gent, Belgium
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

TAGs play an important role in determining the functional properties of fat-based food products such as margarines, chocolate, and spreads. Nowadays, special attention is given to the role of the TAG structure and how it affects functional properties such as mouth feel, texture, and plasticity. Key to this research is the need to develop more healthy fats with a reduced level of trans and saturated fatty acids (SFAs), while maintaining the desired properties. In this study, fat blends with identical levels of SFA (50%) but differing in the ratio asymmetric/symmetric blends were evaluated by pulsed NMR and texturometry as a function of storage time and storage temperature. A higher trisaturated TAG content gave rise to a higher solid fat content (SFC) at higher temperature and a lower SFC at lower temperature for both palmitic and stearic based blends. On the other hand, the effect of symmetry on the SFC-profile of the blends was only clear for the stearic based blends. At lower temperatures, the SFC of symmetric TAG based blend (blend SM) was markedly lower than that of asymmetric TAG based blend (blend iS). However, from 30°C onwards, the SFC of blend SM was clearly higher than that of blend iS. The microscopic analyses revealed a denser crystal network for a higher degree of trisaturated TAG and for symmetric stearic based blends. Moreover, some blends showed a clear evolution of the microstructure during storage with smaller crystals transforming into larger ones. Finally, texture analyses demonstrated the importance of the crystallization and storage temperature on the hardness of the blends.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary