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Should you take omega-3 PUFA before a fatty meal?

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  2. Should you take omega-3 PUFA before a fatty meal?
  3. Topical emulsions with ceramides help control atopic dermatitis
  4. Mass spectrometry: Picolinyl esters of cyclopropene fatty acids

Derosa et al. show for the first time that omega-3 PUFA improve the insulin resistance parameters in a postprandial situation in human patients challenged with oral fat load [950–960]. Three times a day, the patients received 1 g of omega-3 PUFA in the form of ethyl esters capsules containing primarily EPA and DHA, or a placebo capsule. The treatment continued for 6 months. The group receiving PUFA displayed improved lipid profiles and adiponectin values in a baseline condition: the triglycerides were lower while HDL-C and adiponectin were higher compared to placebo. After an oral fat load (a fatty drink based on whipping cream with 35% fat), the insulin resistance markers were improved compared to the placebo group. The results of this double blind placebo controlled study provide one more reason to include sufficient amounts of omega-3 fatty acids in the diet on a regular basis.

Derosa, G. et al. Effects of n-3 PUFA on insulin resistance after an oral fat load. Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 2011, 113, 950–960.

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Topical emulsions with ceramides help control atopic dermatitis

  1. Top of page
  2. Should you take omega-3 PUFA before a fatty meal?
  3. Topical emulsions with ceramides help control atopic dermatitis
  4. Mass spectrometry: Picolinyl esters of cyclopropene fatty acids

Carneiro et al. have developed and characterized two oil-in-water emulsion formulations for the control of atopic dermatitis providing skin hydration and anti-inflammatory activity [961–966]. The two formulations were prepared with hydrocortisone and with and without the skin barrier lipids ceramides. Two corresponding placebo formulations without hydrocortisone were also prepared in order to evaluate the transepidermal water loss (the so-called TEWL, a measure of the skin barrier strength). Anti-inflammatory activity was studied in a mouse croton oil-induced ear inflammation model, while the water permeation studies were performed in vitro. The skin hydration was higher with the ceramide-containing formulations, probably thanks to the supplementation of skin lipids. No negative effects of the barrier lipids on the hydrocortisone release were observed. The formulation developed in this study combines anti-inflammatory and barrier repair properties and shows promise for topical treatment of atopic dermatitis.

Carneiro, R. et al. Topical emulsions containing ceramides: Effects on the skin barrier function and anti-inflammatory properties. Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 2011, 113, 961–966.

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Mass spectrometry: Picolinyl esters of cyclopropene fatty acids

  1. Top of page
  2. Should you take omega-3 PUFA before a fatty meal?
  3. Topical emulsions with ceramides help control atopic dermatitis
  4. Mass spectrometry: Picolinyl esters of cyclopropene fatty acids

Knothe et al. have analyzed the fatty acids extracted from Thespesia populnea, commonly known as the portia tree, by GC, MS, and NMR [980–984]. The presence of cyclopropene and cyclopropane fatty acids, such as malvalic and dihydrosterculic acid, is reported. The authors analyzed these fatty acids by mass spectrometry after derivatization with picolinyl alcohol. The mass spectrum of picolinyl malvalate was investigated in detail, especially an ion at m/z 279, which does not fit the typical series of ions observed in picolinyl esters. It is shown that this ion is generated by a cleavage at the picolinyl moiety and contains the fatty acid chain without the picolinyl moiety. This type of cleavage could be diagnostic for picolinyl esters of cyclopropene fatty acids.

Knothe, G. et al. Fatty acids of Thespesia populnea: Mass spectrometry of picolinyl esters of cyclopropene fatty acids. Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 2011, 113, 980–984.

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