Polyunsaturated fatty acids production and transformation by Mortierella alpina and anaerobic bacteria

Authors

  • Jun Ogawa,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
    • Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502, Japan Fax: +81 75 753 6113
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  • Eiji Sakuradani,

    1. Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
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  • Shigenobu Kishino,

    1. Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
    2. Industrial Microbiology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
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  • Akinori Ando,

    1. Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
    2. Research Unit for Physiological Chemistry, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
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  • Kenzo Yokozeki,

    1. Industrial Microbiology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
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  • Sakayu Shimizu

    1. Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
    2. Faculty of Bio-environmental Science, Kyoto Gakuen University, Sogabe, Kameoka, Kyoto, Japan
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Abstract

Microorganisms are promising as producers of various polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and as catalysts transforming them into unique molecular species beyond common PUFAs. This article describes PUFA production through chemical mutant- and molecular-breeding of an oleaginous filamentous fungus Mortierella alpina 1S-4 and PUFA transformation by anaerobic bacteria. M. alpina 1S-4 and its mutants and transformants produce oils containing not only common n − 6 and n − 3 PUFAs but also rare PUFAs. Unique PUFA-transforming activities were found in anaerobic bacteria. They isomerized PUFA to conjugated fatty acids and further transformed to partially saturated fatty acids with hydroxyl fatty acids as intermediates. The functions of these unique PUFAs have been attracting much attention for improving our health and for developing new chemical materials.

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