Lipid damage inhibition by previous high pressure processing in white muscle of frozen horse mackerel

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Abstract

This work focuses on the effect of a previous high pressure processing (HPP) on the lipid damage development occurring during the frozen storage (−10°C; up to 3 months) of Atlantic horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus). HPP conditions included different pressure (150, 300, 450 MPa) and pressure holding time (0.0, 2.5, 5.0 min) values. During frozen storage, horse mackerel muscle was analyzed for lipid hydrolysis (free fatty acid assessment; FFA) and oxidation (formation of peroxides, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and fluorescent compounds), and polyene content. An inhibition of lipid hydrolysis development was observed; thus, both an increasing pressure level and pressure holding time led to a marked inhibition of FFA content throughout the frozen storage. Concerning the lipid oxidation development, a partial inhibition was also obtained during the frozen storage (months 1 and 3) by increasing the pressure level applied (namely, fluorescent and peroxide compound formation); however, pressure holding time did not lead to a definite trend. No effect of HPP treatment was concluded on the polyene content of the fish muscle lipids. Present research provides novel information concerning the employment of HPP technology focused on the inhibition of lipid damage during a subsequent frozen storage.

Practical applications: Frozen storage of fatty and medium-fat fish species is known to be strongly limited by lipid damage development, which is a drawback to its commercialization as such or to its subsequent employment as raw material in other kinds of processing (canneries, smoking, etc.). Present research provides valuable information concerning the employment of the high pressure technology to inhibit lipid damage development during the subsequent frozen storage of Atlantic horse mackerel (T. trachurus). Thus, both an increasing pressure level (from 150 to 450 MPa) and pressure holding time (from 0 to 5 min) led to a marked inhibition of lipid hydrolysis during frozen storage. Additionally, inhibition of lipid oxidation was produced by increasing the pressure level. Since the response to HPP of marine species has been reported to vary with species, a preliminary study is recommended to be carried out before applying the high pressure-frozen storage combining strategy.

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