Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy: An interesting complementary approach for lipid detection in biological tissues

Authors

  • Laure Jadoul,

    Corresponding author
    1. Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium
    • Correspondence: Laure Jadoul, Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, 4000 Liège, Belgium

      E-mail: laure.jadoul@doct.ulg.ac.be

      Fax: +32 4 366 34 13

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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.
  • Cédric Malherbe,

    1. Inorganic Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.
  • David Calligaris,

    1. Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium
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    • Current address: Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
  • Rémi Longuespée,

    1. Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium
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  • Bernard Gilbert,

    1. Inorganic Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium
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  • Gauthier Eppe,

    1. Inorganic Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium
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  • Edwin De Pauw

    1. Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium
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Abstract

Recently, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) has emerged as a powerful technique to study the distribution of lipids. However, quantification still remains a challenge because the MALDI signal is strongly affected by ion suppression effects. On the contrary, Raman spectroscopy is recognized as a non-destructive analysis method and spectral images can also be acquired. The combination of these two techniques was applied for lipids detection in tissue sections. In MALDI, two lipids families (glycerophosphocholine, PC; gycerophosphoethanolamine, PE), three MALDI matrices (1,5-diaminonapthalene, 1,5-DAN; 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,5-DHB; α-4-hydroxicinammic acid, CHCA), and various mixtures of lipids were investigated. The nature of the lipid, as well as the nature of the matrix and the composition of the sample influences the signal of a given lipid. In Raman, despite a strong overlap with the spectrum of the native tissue, an intensity profile constructed along the diameter of the section clearly shows that the signature of one given lipid (a glycerophosphocholine) can be detected on a doped biological sample.

Practical applications: This study highlights some important factors that should be considered in future lipids analyses by MALDI MSI and Raman spectroscopy. Ultimately, a combined approach of these two techniques will give information for instance about the alteration of the lipid metabolism associated with specific diseases.

ejlt201300198-gra-0001

Detection of lipid in homogenate tissue section by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy.

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