European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology

Cover image for Vol. 114 Issue 11

November 2012

Volume 114, Issue 11

Pages 1227–1332

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. In this issue
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communication
    8. Retraction
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      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 11/2012

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201290031

  2. In this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. In this issue
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communication
    8. Retraction
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      In this issue

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201290032

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. In this issue
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communication
    8. Retraction
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 11/2012

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201290033

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. In this issue
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communication
    8. Retraction
    1. You have free access to this content
  5. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. In this issue
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communication
    8. Retraction
    1. Effect of Lactobacillus plantarum P-8 on lipid metabolism in hyperlipidemic rat model (pages 1230–1236)

      Yan Bao, Zhanli Wang, Yong Zhang, Jiachao Zhang, Lifeng Wang, Ximei Dong, Fang Su, Guoqiang Yao, Shuiquan Wang and Heping Zhang

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201100393

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hepatic lipid deposition in the control, model, and L. plantarum P-8 group shown using HE staining.

    2. In vitro antioxidant and in vivo antidiabetic, antihyperlipidemic activity of linseed oil against streptozotocin-induced toxicity in albino rats (pages 1237–1245)

      Gaurav Kaithwas and Dipak K. Majumdar

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201100263

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Antioxidant and antidiabetic, antihyperlipidemic activity of linseed oil.

    3. Lipase-mediated hydrolysis of flax seed oil for selective enrichment of α-linolenic acid (pages 1246–1253)

      Banin Rupani, Kisan Kodam, Ramchandra Gadre and Ghasem D. Najafpour

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201100384

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Figure shows hydrolysis of flax seed oil with four different lipases which Candida rugosa gives highest ALA concentration after hydrolysis

    4. Enzymatic preparation of L-α-glycerylphosphorylcholine in an aqueous medium (pages 1254–1260)

      Kangyi Zhang, Yuanfa Liu and Xingguo Wang

      Article first published online: 17 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201100219

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      L-α-GPC was successfully prepared from PC using phospholipase A1 (Lecitase Ultra). The sn-1 fatty acid of PCs is hydrolyzed by Lecitase Ultra; spontaneously acyl migration takes place with the fatty acids at the sn-2 position moving to the sn-1 position; sn-1-LPC are hydrolyzed to produce L-α-GPC. The structure of purified L-α-GPC was agreement with that of standard sample.

    5. Structured phosphatidylcholine with elevated content of conjugated linoleic acid: Optimization by response surface methodology (pages 1261–1267)

      Ramiro Baeza-Jiménez, Juan A. Noriega-Rodríguez, Hugo S. García and Cristina Otero

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200038

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A plot representing the reaction scheme for the production of structured phosphatidylcholine (SPC). The mechanisms for SPC formation in the acidolysis reactions studied also involve hydrolysis and esterification reactions. As a result, lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) is produced in the first step and it quickly becomes a reactant in the second step. The amount of LPC in the reaction mixture affects the overall reaction rate and also causes acyl migration or by-products formation, and as a consequence the formation of LPC decreases the yield and purity of SPC.

    6. Generation of 3-monochloro-1,2-propanediol and related materials from tri-, di-, and monoolein at deodorization temperature (pages 1268–1273)

      Masao Shimizu, Klaus Vosmann and Bertrand Matthäus

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200078

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Time course changes in 3-MCPD and related materials in MCPD equivalent determined by DGF method C-VI 18 (10) assay A during the heating of monoolein (triangle), diolein (diamond), and triolein (circle) with (closed) or without (opened) a chloride source at 240°C.

    7. Stabilization of refined olive oil by enrichment with chlorophyll pigments extracted from Chemlali olive leaves (pages 1274–1283)

      Hazem Jaber, Mohamed Ayadi, Jamel Makni, Ghayth Rigane, Sami Sayadi and Mohamed Bouaziz

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201100176

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chlorophyll pigment from Chemlali olive leaves inhibits thermal deterioration of oil by improving its hydrolytic stability, inhibiting double bond conjugation and reducing the losses of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    8. Antioxidative and synergistic effects of bene kernel and hull oils during oxidation of virgin olive oil (pages 1284–1291)

      Reza Farhoosh, Mohammad Hossein Haddad Khodaparast, Ali Sharif, Seyedeh-Zohreh Hoseini-Yazdi and Atefeh Zamani-Ghalehshahi

      Article first published online: 17 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200135

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The logarithm of oxidative stability (OS) measures calculated based on the conjugated diene value (CDV) or carbonyl value (CV) versus the logarithm of the percentage of the bene kernel oil (BKO)/bene hull oil (BHO) added to the virgin olive oil (VOO) or purified VOO (PVOO).

    9. Evaluation of a model system for the selective study of the lipid peroxidation process (pages 1292–1303)

      Branka Mihaljević, Ivana Tartaro and Nada Filipović Vinceković

      Article first published online: 18 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200116

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      TWEEN®-20 micelles established as nanoreactors for lipid peroxidation study in acidic medium.

    10. Rapid determination of cholesterol in emulsified confectioneries by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (pages 1304–1311)

      Jang-Hyuk Ahn, In-Seek Jeong, Byung-Man Kwak, Donggil Leem, Taehyung Yoon, Changyong Yoon, Jayoung Jeong, Jung-Min Park and Jin-Man Kim

      Article first published online: 31 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200149

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cholesterol was separated by ultra performance liquid chromatography in 5.5 min.

    11. Improved method for the determination of wax esters in vegetable oils (pages 1312–1319)

      Amalia A. Carelli, Erica B. Bäumler and Liliana N. Ceci

      Article first published online: 31 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200098

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      (a) The IOC method (COI/T.20/Doc. No. 18/Rev. 2, 2003) for wax esters analysis is improved adding a phase of silica gel impregnated with silver nitrate during column chromatography step. (b) Chromatogram for extra virgin olive oil. The improved method eliminates interfering compounds (steryl and terpenic esters) that coelute with wax esters. (c) Chromatogram for crude sunflower oil. The improved method allows the quantification of wax esters from C34 to C60.

    12. Zinc and nickel determination in liquid edible oils by FAAS after the extraction (pages 1320–1326)

      Eda Köse Baran and Sema Bağdat Yaşar

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201100081

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The molecular structure of [N,N′-bis(salicylidene)-2,2′-dimethyl-1,3-propanediaminato].

  6. Short Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. In this issue
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communication
    8. Retraction
    1. Gold-catalyzed synthesis of dicarboxylic and monocarboxylic acids (pages 1327–1332)

      Anna Kulik, Alexander Janz, Marga-Martina Pohl, Andreas Martin and Angela Köckritz

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200027

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Azelaic acid or brassylic acid and pelargonic acid were obtained by catalytic aerobic cleavage of 9,10-dihydroxystearic acid, its methyl ester or 13,14-dihydroxybehenic acid in the presence of supported gold catalysts.

  7. Retraction

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. In this issue
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communication
    8. Retraction
    1. You have free access to this content

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