European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology

Cover image for Vol. 114 Issue 6

Special Issue: Sterols

June 2012

Volume 114, Issue 6

Pages 613–700

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. In this issue
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Commentary
    7. Review Articles
    8. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 6/2012

      Article first published online: 8 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201290015

  2. In this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. In this issue
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Commentary
    7. Review Articles
    8. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      In this issue

      Article first published online: 8 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201290016

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. In this issue
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Commentary
    7. Review Articles
    8. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 6/2012

      Article first published online: 8 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201290017

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. In this issue
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Commentary
    7. Review Articles
    8. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
  5. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. In this issue
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Commentary
    7. Review Articles
    8. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
  6. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. In this issue
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Commentary
    7. Review Articles
    8. Research Articles
    1. Cholesterol versus other sterols: How do they compare as physiological regulators of cholesterol homeostasis? (pages 617–623)

      Andrew J. Brown

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201100295

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Routes of production and structures of some of the major side-chain oxysterols. (A) Side-chain oxysterols enzymatically derived from cholesterol include 24S-, 25-, and 27-hydroxycholesterol. (B) The shunt pathway runs parallel to cholesterol synthesis and leads to the production of 24S,25-epoxycholesterol. Partial inhibition of oxidosqualene cyclase diverts more flux into the shunt pathway, favouring production of this oxysterol.

    2. Cholesteryl esters and ACAT (pages 624–633)

      Camilla Pramfalk, Mats Eriksson and Paolo Parini

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201100294

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A schematic representation of the different functions of ACAT1 and ACAT2 in lipoprotein metabolism in humans. ACAT1 synthesizes CEs in different cell types (i.e., macrophages and Kupffer cells) to maintain constant UEC levels. ACAT2 synthesizes CE in enterocytes and hepatocytes fated to storage or to secretion into chylomicrons and VLDL, respectively. Thus, ACAT2 is a relevant determinant of the atherogenic CE transported into remnants. Blue arrows depict fluxes of CE, red arrows depict fluxes of UEC.

    3. Oxysterol-binding proteins–emerging roles in cell regulation (pages 634–643)

      Vesa M. Olkkonen, You Zhou, Daoguang Yan and Terhi Vihervaara

      Article first published online: 25 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200044

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biological functions of ORPs. An ORP at a membrane contact site is depicted.

    4. Cholesterol photosensitized oxidation in muscle foods (pages 644–655)

      Emanuele Boselli, Vladimiro Cardenia and Maria Teresa Rodriguez-Estrada

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201100352

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The mechanism of formation of B-ring COPs by photosensitized oxidation and autoxidation.

  7. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. In this issue
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Commentary
    7. Review Articles
    8. Research Articles
    1. Steryl glycosides and acylated steryl glycosides in plant foods reflect unique sterol patterns (pages 656–669)

      Laura Nyström, Aline Schär and Anna-Maija Lampi

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200033

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Structures of common ASG and SG: (1) spinasteryl glucoside, (2) stigmasteryl glucoside, and (3) sitosteryl palmitoyl glucoside.

    2. Enzymatic strategies for solvent-free production of short and medium chain phytosteryl esters (pages 670–676)

      Guzman Torrelo, Carlos F. Torres and Guillermo Reglero

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201100346

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Transesterification reaction of tributyrin with phytosterols. Open circles = tributyrin, squares = phytosterols, open triangles = phytosteryl ester, solid circles = dibutyrin, solid triangles = monobutyrin.

    3. The effects of acyl moiety and temperature on the polymerization of sterols (pages 677–686)

      Mari Lehtonen, Anna-Maija Lampi, Flora Agalga, Karin Struijs and Vieno Piironen

      Article first published online: 27 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201100305

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The separation of oligomers and monomers by SEC-RI. (a) Cholesteryl stearate, (b) cholesteryl oleate, (c) cholesteryl linoleate, and (d) free cholesterol oxidized at 100°C for 0-5 days.

    4. Cholesterol oxidation products in milk: Processing formation and determination (pages 687–694)

      Mónica Calderón-Santiago, Ángela Peralbo-Molina, Feliciano Priego-Capote and María Dolores Luque de Castro

      Article first published online: 8 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201100139

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fragment ions used for quantification of the target compounds.

    5. High cholesterol oxidation in pickled mackerel (Rastrelliger kanagurta) from Sri Lanka (pages 695–700)

      Sarojini J. K. A. Ubhayasekera, Pradeepa Jayasinghe, Sagarika Ekanayake and Paresh C. Dutta

      Article first published online: 8 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200017

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      GC-MS chromatogram showing resolution of some common cholesterol oxidation products present in a pickled mackerel sample. Peak identification: 1, IS (internal standard); 2, 7α-HC (7α-hydroxycholesterol); 3, Cholesterol; 4, 7β-HC (7β-hydroxycholesterol); 5, β-CE (β-epoxycholesterol-); 6, α-CE (α-epoxycholesterol); 7, CT (cholesteroltriol); 8 25-HC (25-hydroxycholesterol); 9, 7-KC (7-ketocholesterol).

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