European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology

Cover image for Vol. 115 Issue 11

Special Issue: EuroFedLipid Highlights 2013

November 2013

Volume 115, Issue 11

Pages 1203–1346

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
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    9. Research Articles
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      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 11∕2013

      Version of Record online: 8 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201370025

  2. Editorial board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Highlight Articles
    8. Article Preview
    9. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 11∕2013

      Version of Record online: 8 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201370026

  3. In this Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Highlight Articles
    8. Article Preview
    9. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 11∕2013

      Version of Record online: 8 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201370027

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Highlight Articles
    8. Article Preview
    9. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 11∕2013

      Version of Record online: 8 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201370028

  5. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Highlight Articles
    8. Article Preview
    9. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
  6. Highlight Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Highlight Articles
    8. Article Preview
    9. Research Articles
    1. Misdescription of edible oils: Flowcharts of analytical choices in a forensic view (pages 1205–1223)

      Tullia Gallina Toschi, Alessandra Bendini, Jesus Lozano-Sánchez, Antonio Segura-Carretero and Lanfranco Conte

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300070

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Scheme which summarizes possible problems of authenticity and misdescriptions of the edible oils.

    2. External factors affecting polymorphic crystallization of lipids (pages 1224–1238)

      Kiyotaka Sato, Laura Bayés-García, Teresa Calvet, Miquel Àngel Cuevas-Diarte and Satoru Ueno

      Version of Record online: 22 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300049

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The figure illustrates that crystallization rates of polymorphic lipids can be affected by external factors in different manners. The crystallization rate of polymorph B increased more than that of polymorph A, and the first-occurring polymorphic form varies by the external factors, depending on cooling rates. Dotted and solid lines mean without and with external factors, respectively, and Tm is melting temperature.

    3. Regulation and enhancement of lipid accumulation in oil crops: The use of metabolic control analysis for informed genetic manipulation (pages 1239–1246)

      John L. Harwood, Umi S. Ramli, Mingguo Tang, Patti A Quant, Randall J. Weselake, Tony Fawcett and Irina A. Guschina

      Version of Record online: 2 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300257

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simplified lipid biosynthesis scheme as used in our metabolic control analysis. Carbon flux from [1-14C]acetate enters Block A to produce fatty acids. Block A contains a number of enzymes involved in [1-14C]acetate metabolism. The cytosolic acyl-CoA pool is the defined system intermediate and its level could be increased with exogenous oleate in single-manipulation experiments. In contrast with radioactivity from [1-14C]acetate, which enters Block B reactions (Kennedy pathway conversions and other reactions for lipid synthesis) via the acyl-CoA pool, [U-14C]glycerol labeled acyl lipids via the Kennedy pathway reactions directly.

    4. Biotechnology for the functional improvement of cereal-based materials enriched with PUFA and pigments (pages 1247–1256)

      Milan Čertík, Tatiana Klempová, Lucia Guothová, Daniel Mihálik and Ján Kraic

      Version of Record online: 19 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300092

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The strategy to naturally enhance content of PUFAs/pigments in cereals is based on two biotechnological techniques: (a) solid state fermentations of cereals by appropriate fungal strains forming PUFAs and pigments and (b) gene engineering of cereals with fungal genes involved to PUFA/pigment biosynthesis. The final cereal-based “bioproduct” enriched with PUFAs/pigments might find applications in food, feed, and veterinary fields.

  7. Article Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Highlight Articles
    8. Article Preview
    9. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
  8. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
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    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Highlight Articles
    8. Article Preview
    9. Research Articles
    1. Camelina sativa affects the fatty acid contents in M. longissimus muscle of lambs (pages 1258–1265)

      Adam Cieslak, Marek Stanisz, Jacek Wojtowski, Emilia Pers-Kamczyc, Joanna Szczechowiak, Mohamed El-Sherbiny and Malgorzata Szumacher-Strabel

      Version of Record online: 10 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200119

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The dietary fatty acid composition is the most important factor that can affect fatty acid profiles in the rumen, and hence, in ruminant tissues. C. sativa cake that contained approximately 10% residual oil and 7 characterized mainly by a high content of UFAs was used as a source of dietary UFA. Supplementing lamb diets with C. sativa cake, increased either c9t11 or t10c12 linoleic acid isomers in longissimus dorsi muscle. Linoleic, linolenic, eicosapentaenoic, and docosapentaenoic acid contents also increased.

    2. Suppression of visceral adipose tissue by palm kernel and soy-canola diacylglycerol in C57BL/6N mice (pages 1266–1273)

      Teck-Kim Tang, Boon-Kee Beh, Noorjahan Banu Mohamed Alitheen, Seong-Koon Lo, Yee-Ying Lee and Oi-Ming Lai

      Version of Record online: 23 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300111

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A 16 week preclinical study with palm kernel based diacylglycerol (PKDG) and soy-canola diacylglycerol (SCDG)-fed C57BL/6N mice was conducted. The results showed that PKDG and SCDG suppress visceral adipose tissue.

    3. Lipoproteinemia and arylesterase activity in Zucker Fa/Fa rats fed glucomannan/spirulina-enriched squid-surimi (pages 1274–1283)

      Miguel Vázquez-Velasco, Laura González-Torres, Raúl Olivero-David, Sara Bastida, Juana Benedí, Mª Isabel Sánchez-Reus, Mª José González-Muñoz and Francisco J. Sánchez-Muniz

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300147

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fa/Fa rats plasma and lipoprotein fractions lipids. C, rodent diet and squid-surimi; G, the squid-surimi enriched with konjac flour; GS, glucomannan-squid-surimi and Spirulina platensis. HC, HG, and HGS diets were equivalent to C, G, and GS diets but with cholesterol and cholic acid. Glucomannan, with no extra effect of spirulina, reduced lipoprotein lipids and tended to normalize lipoprotein profile. Unlike a and b at same fraction, or A and B at plasma lipids, differences between C, G and GS or HC, HG and HGS. * ◊, differences between C vs. HC; G vs. HG or GS vs. HGS for same liproprotein and plasma lipid, respectively.

    4. Immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory effects of N-acyl dopamines on Con A-stimulated splenocytes of BALB/c mouse (pages 1284–1293)

      Mei Chen Jin, Xi-Wen Liu, Mee Ree Kim and Dai-Eun Sok

      Version of Record online: 10 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300006

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Endovanilloid derivatives such as NADA or OLDA induce a potent immunosuppressive action in Con A-stimulated splenocytes.

    5. Formulation of sub-micron emulsions containing docosahexaenoic acid esterified in triacylglycerols or phospholipids (pages 1294–1308)

      Tin-Hinan Kabri, Anne Meynier, Delphine Bontemps, Cédric Gaillard, Loic Foucat, Michel Linder and Claude Genot

      Version of Record online: 23 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300045

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two stable sub-micron emulsions with the same fatty acid composition responding to nutritional requirements have been formulated. DHA was present either in the PL stabilizing molecules or in TAG of tuna oil for the emulsion stabilized by a mixture of phosphatidylcholine and Tween-80.

    6. Influence of the inlet air temperature on the microencapsulation of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) seed oil (pages 1309–1318)

      Shy-Kai Ng, Pui-Yee Wong, Chin-Ping Tan, Kamariah Long and Kar-Lin Nyam

      Version of Record online: 23 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200436

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Scanning electron micrograph of the microencapsulated kenaf seed oil obtained at 180°C.

    7. Debittering of black dry-salted olives (pages 1319–1324)

      Eva Ramírez, Pedro García-García, Antonio de Castro, Concepción Romero and Manuel Brenes

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300167

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Debittering of black olives by polyphenol oxidase activity during the dry-salting process: oxidation of the bitter glucoside oleuropein.

    8. Comparison of saponification methods for characterization of the nonsaponifiable fraction of virgin olive oil (pages 1325–1333)

      Verónica Sánchez de Medina, Feliciano Priego-Capote and María Dolores Luque de Castro

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300191

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Score plots for PCA corresponding to different saponification methods:

      cold saponification,

      hot saponification,

      MW saponification,

      US saponification.

    9. Cloning and molecular characterization of a class A lysophosphatidate acyltransferase gene (EpLPAT2) from Echium (Boraginaceae) (pages 1334–1346)

      Aurora Mañas-Fernández, José María Arroyo-Caro, Diego López Alonso and Federico García-Maroto

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300195

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Diagram depicting the acylation reaction catalyzed by the Echium LPAT2. Specificity on the diverse acyl-CoA donors is indicated, and the high rate on the α-linolenic (18:3) thioester is highlighted. LPA, lysophosphatidic acid; PA, phosphatidic acid; TAG, triacylglycerols; PL, phospholipids.

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