European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology

Cover image for Vol. 115 Issue 6

June 2013

Volume 115, Issue 6

Pages 591–715

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. In this issue
    4. Contents
    5. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 6/2013

      Article first published online: 7 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201390014

  2. In this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. In this issue
    4. Contents
    5. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      In this issue

      Article first published online: 7 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201390015

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. In this issue
    4. Contents
    5. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 6/2013

      Article first published online: 7 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201390016

  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. In this issue
    4. Contents
    5. Research Articles
    1. The cytotoxicity of fatty acid/α-lactalbumin complexes depends on the amount and type of fatty acid (pages 591–600)

      Christel Rothe Brinkmann, André Brodkorb, Steffen Thiel and Joseph J. Kehoe

      Article first published online: 17 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200165

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      The viability of HL-60 cells treated with elaidic, vaccenic, linoleic, palmitoleic, stearic, or oleic acid in complex with bovine α-lactalbumin and below flow cytometry analysis of phosphatidyl serine exposure and membrane permeability using Annexin V-PE and 7AAD. A–C: Jurkat cells treated with increasing concentrations of an α-lactalbumin linoleic acid complex.

    2. Development and characterization of a digestion model based on olive oil microemulsions (pages 601–611)

      Aggeliki Kyriazi, Vassiliki Papadimitriou, Theodore G. Sotiroudis and Aristotelis Xenakis

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200340

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      Development and structural characterization of an in vitro digestion model based on virgin olive oil microemulsions: enzymatic hydrolysis in the small intestine.

    3. Prediction of the goat milk fatty acids by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (pages 612–620)

      Donato Andueza, Jacques Rouel, Yves Chilliard, Christine Leroux and Anne Ferlay

      Article first published online: 5 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200315

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      NIRS procedure for predicting fatty acid composition in ruminant milk.

    4. Phenolic acid content and sensory properties of two Spanish monovarietal virgin olive oils (pages 621–630)

      Ana Rivas, Araceli Sanchez-Ortiz, Brigida Jimenez, Jesus García-Moyano and Maria Luisa Lorenzo

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200371

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      The UPLC-TOF-MS methodology developed in this study is valid for extracting and analysing phenolic acids from virgin olive oil. The phenolic acid content of the virgin olive oils sampled was proven to be influenced by the type of cultivar and olive harvest date. Sensory properties of VOO may be differently affected by its phenolic acid content depending on the type of cultivar.

    5. Comparative study of olive oil quality from Chemlali Sfax versus Arbequina cultivated in Tunisia (pages 631–640)

      Mohamed Chtourou, Boutheina Gargouri, Hazem Jaber, Ridha Abdelhedi and Mohamed Bouaziz

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200234

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      The geographic area appears to play a more significant role for the qualitative characteristics and the sensory attributes of Arbequina olive oil. The influence of the growing area conditions on the oxidative stability of the oils was greater for Arbequina, Arbequina olive showed a high tolerance against variation in climate and plantation zone and produce an oil similar to Chemlali cv.

    6. Lipid characteristics and phenolics of native grape seed oils grown in Turkey (pages 641–647)

      Ilknur Demirtas, Ebru Pelvan, İbrahim Sani Özdemir, Cesarettin Alasalvar and Erdal Ertas

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200159

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      Typical HPLC-Florescence chromatograms: (a) eight tocol standard mixture, (b) tocols from Atfi, in the order of retention time, (α-T) α-tocopherol, (α-T3) α-tocotrienol, (β-T) β-tocopherol, (γ-T) γ-tocopherol, (β-T3) β-tocotrienol, (γ-T3) γ-tocotrienol, (δ-T) δ-tocopherol, (δ-T3) δ-tocotrienol.

    7. The influence of the UV irradiation on degradation of virgin rapeseed oils (pages 648–658)

      Roman Pawłowicz, Justyna Gromadzka, Maria Tynek, Robert Tylingo, Waldemar Wardencki and Gyorgy Karlovits

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200126

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      The influence of the UV irradiation on sensory profile of virgin rapeseed oil.

    8. Emulsifier and antioxidant properties of by-products obtained by enzymatic degumming of soybean oil (pages 659–667)

      Dario M. Cabezas, Bernd W. K. Diehl and Mabel C. Tomás

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200333

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      Flow diagram of the process used for producing different phospholipidic-products to analyze their emulsifier and antioxidant properties.

    9. Effectiveness of modified zeolites as adsorbent materials for frying oils (pages 668–675)

      Alper Dülger and Emin Yılmaz

      Article first published online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200312

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      Natural zeolite was modified by four different techniques to enhance its ability as frying oil adsorbent material. Tween80 modified zeolite was found the most effective one. The potential of zeolite surface modification for this purpose has proved.

    10. C18-unsaturated branched-chain fatty acid isomers: Characterization and physical properties (pages 676–683)

      Helen L. Ngo, Robert O. Dunn and Eunha Hoh

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200323

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      Iso-oleic acid is a mixture of C18-unsaturated branched-chain fatty acid isomers with a methyl group on various positions of the alkyl chain, which is the product of the skeletal isomerization reaction of oleic acid. It was found to have excellent cold flow and lubricity properties, showing excellent potential in replacing petroleum-based lubricants.

    11. High yield of monoacylglycerols production through low-temperature chemical and enzymatic glycerolysis (pages 684–690)

      Nanjing Zhong, Lin Li, Xuebing Xu, Ling-Zhi Cheong, Zhenbo Xu and Dr. Bing Li

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200377

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      Using NaOH to catalyze the glycerolysis of TAG and glycerol in tert-butanol solvent medium, over 80% MAG yield with 97% TAG conversion was obtained within short reaction times even at temperature of 35–55°C. Interestingly, the NaOH-catalyzed glycerolysis reaction was faster than the Novozym 435-catalyzed, in spite of the similar MAG yield and TAG conversion that obtained from both chemical and enzymatic glycerolysis reactions.

    12. Kinetic studies on the esterification of free fatty acids in jatropha oil (pages 691–697)

      Karna Narayana Prasanna Rani, Thella Prathap Kumar, Tulasi Sri Venkata Ramana Neeharika, Bankupalli Satyavathi and Rachapudi Badari Narayana Prasad

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200273

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      A kinetic model for esterification of FFA present in jatropha oil has been developed, and the rate constants and equilibrium constant have been evaluated. The experimental results showed that the highest conversion has been obtained with 60:1 methanol–FFA mole ratio and 5% sulphuric acid at 60°C.

    13. New biobased carboxylic acid hardeners for epoxy resins (pages 698–708)

      Fanny Jaillet, Myriam Desroches, Rémi Auvergne, Bernard Boutevin and Sylvain Caillol

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200363

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      Fully biobased polyacid was synthesized by thiol-ene coupling reaction between soybean oil and thioglycolic acid. Synthesized polyacid was formulated with BADGE to yield partially biobased epoxy resins. Reactivity of synthesized polyacid is far higher than other acids due to sulfur presence in vicinity. Thermal properties of obtained materials showed that synthesized polyacid lead to coating material with Tg values around −12°C.

    14. Influence of hydrogenation and antioxidants on the stability of soybean oil biodiesels (pages 709–715)

      Cristiane D. Alexandrino, Selene M. Morais, Micheline S. C. Oliveira, Lyeghyna K. A. Machado, Clécio G. Martins, Afrânio A. Craveiro, Naele C. Rocha, Camila P. Valle, Jackson Q. Malveira and Fernando A. S. Jorge

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200348

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      Mango seed kernel extracts and constituents protect biodiesel against oxidation.

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