European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology

Cover image for Vol. 115 Issue 7

July 2013

Volume 115, Issue 7

Pages 717–830

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Research Articles
    8. Short Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 7∕2013

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201370009

  2. Editorial board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Research Articles
    8. Short Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 7∕2013

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201370010

  3. In this Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Research Articles
    8. Short Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Research Articles
    8. Short Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 7∕2013

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201370012

  5. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Research Articles
    8. Short Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
  6. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Research Articles
    8. Short Communications
    1. Homogeneous metal complex catalyzed conjugation of methyl linoleate (pages 721–728)

      Arno Behr, Henning Witte and Zeynep Bayrak

      Article first published online: 31 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200429

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Conjugated methyl linoleates (CML) can be produced by homogeneous transition metal catalysis under mild reaction conditions, low catalyst concentrations and short reaction times in nearly quantitative yield from methyl linoleate (ML), an easily accessible intermediate product of the oleochemical industry. A yield of 93% of conjugated methyl linoleates can be obtained under mild reaction conditions at 60°C and low reaction times of 3 h.fx1

    2. α-Arylation of saturated fatty acids (pages 729–734)

      Nicolai Kolb, Robert Hofsäß and Michael A. R. Meier

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300082

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The palladium catalyzed alpha-arylation of saturated fatty acid tert-butyl esters leads to diesters in good yields.fx1

    3. Influence of chloride and glycidyl-ester on the generation of 3-MCPD- and glycidyl-esters (pages 735–739)

      Masao Shimizu, Petra Weitkamp, Klaus Vosmann and Bertrand Matthäus

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200310

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Time course changes in 3-MCPD esters from diolein test oils that initially contained zero (A), 60 mg/kg (B), or 120 mg/kg (C) of GE as an MCPD equivalent, during heating tests at 240°C without chloride (circle), or with 10 mg/kg (triangle), 30 mg/kg (square), and 50 mg/kg (diamond) of chloride. Data are described as the mean value of the differences in the duplicated experiments. Data under the limit of quantification (LOQ) were plotted on the LOQ (0.2 mg/kg). The levels of 3-MCPD ester were strongly influenced by both chloride and initial GE content.

    4. Preparation of alkyl 11-anilino-10-hydroxy undecanoates and evaluation of their antioxidant activity (pages 740–746)

      Gorla Geethanjali, Korlipara V. Padmaja, Bojja Sreedhar and Rachapudi Badari N. Prasad

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200392

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Alkyl 11-anilino-10-hydroxy undecanoates were synthesized by varying alkyl chain length from C1 to C8 and studied for their antioxidant activity on lubricant base stock namely, epoxy karanja fatty acid 2-ethylhexyl esters.fx1

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Antioxidant effect of mono- and dihydroxyphenols in sunflower oil with different levels of naturally present tocopherols (pages 747–755)

      Iveta Hrádková, Roman Merkl, Jan Šmidrkal, Jan Kyselka and Vladimír Filip

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200293

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chemical structure of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (1); caffeic acid (2); protocatechuic acid (3); gentisic acid (4); vanillic acid (5); ferulic acid (6).fx1

    6. Toxic effects of triacylglycerol polymer on macrophages in vitro (pages 756–763)

      Wenming Cao, Xiang Wang, Weiyun Zhang and Xingguo Wang

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300020

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      The effects of triacylglycerol polymer on macrophages.fx1

    7. Volatile compounds in intermittent frying by gas chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance (pages 764–773)

      Raffaele Romano, Anella Giordano, Laura Le Grottaglie, Nadia Manzo, Antonello Paduano, Raffaele Sacchi and Antonello Santini

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200341

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      1H NMR spectra of frying oil.

    8. Potential protective effect of Nigella sativa crude oils towards fatty liver in rats (pages 774–782)

      Sahar Y. Al-Okbi, Doha A. Mohamed, Thanaa E. Hamed and Prof. Amr E. Edris

      Article first published online: 31 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200256

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      Increased consumption of fructose leads to increased hepatic fat deposition and triggers inflammatory factors, which are closely related to nonalcoholic fatty liver. Oral administration of Nigella crude oil produced significant improvement of all parameters associated with this disease indicating inhibitory activity and protection againest non-alcoholic fatty liver.fx1

    9. Protective effect and mechanism of phosphatidylserine in UVB-induced human dermal fibroblasts (pages 783–790)

      Sang-Hoon Lee, Ji-Hee Yang, Yong-Kon Park, Jeong-Jun Han, Guk-Hoon Chung, Dae-Hyun Hahm and Hee-Don Choi

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200086

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Inhibitory effects of phosphatidylserine (PS) on MMP-1 expression levels in UVB-induced HDF. (a) 80% confluent HDFs were treated with different concentrations of PS and irradiated with UVB (60 mJ/cm2). After 24 h incubaton, cell lysates were collected and subjected to SDS–PAGE and Western blots. β-Actin were used as an internal control. (b) The intensities of MMP-1 bands were quantified by densitometry and expressed as relative MMP-1 expression ratio compared to UVB-irradiated HDF cells without PS treatment.fx1

    10. Enrichment process for α-linolenic acid from silkworm pupae oil (pages 791–799)

      Jun Wang, Jin-Liang Zhang and Fu-An Wu

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200324

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simple, highly selective and low-cost two-stage combinative inclusion process for obtaining ALA concentrate from silkworm (Bombyx mori L.) pupae oil was established. In the first stage, when the volume ratio of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD)-saturated solution to free fatty acids ethanol solution was 9 v/v, the dispersion temperature and time were 60°C and 1.5 h, the freezing temperature and time were −10°C and 15 h, and the purity of ALA was raised from 15.0 to 47.6 % with a recovery of 39.4%. Then, the purity of ALA was further increased to 67.4% in the second-stage operation with a corresponding recovery of 34.8% using urea complexation.fx1

    11. Phenolic composition of virgin olive oils in cultivars for narrow hedgerow olive orchards (pages 800–810)

      Milad El Riachy, Feliciano Priego-Capote, Luis Rallo, María Dolores Luque-de Castro and Lorenzo León

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300001

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The new olive Sikitita planted in Narrow Hedgerows System (NHS): a new concept of olive orchards characterized by minimum labor requirements, continuous mechanical harvesting, early bearing, high yield, and olive oil quality.fx1

    12. Alpha-tocopherol microspheres with cross-linked and acetylated inulin and their release profile in a hydrophilic model (pages 811–819)

      Paula García, Juan Vega, Paula Jimenez, José Santos and Paz Robert

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200109

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Alpha-tocopherol was encapsulated with native, acetylated or cross-linked inulin (two degrees each) by spray-drying.fx1

  7. Short Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Research Articles
    8. Short Communications
    1. Influence of lipids on the properties of solid lipid nanoparticles from microemulsion technique (pages 820–824)

      Prapaporn Boonme, Eliana B. Souto, Norasak Wuttisantikul, Tarntep Jongjit and Wiwat Pichayakorn

      Article first published online: 31 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200240

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Various lipids and water dilution ratios were investigated for the effects on SLN prepared by microemulsion technique. System containing glyceryl trimyristate, water, and surfactant mixture (polysorbate 80:1-butanol 4:1) provided a remarkable size of the microemulsion region. A warm oil-in-water microemulsion of this system which composed of 7% lipid, 30% water, and 63% surfactant mixture resulted in SLN with satisfying physical properties after dilution with cold water at the ratio of 1:50.fx1

    2. Robotized method for the quantification of fatty acids by gas–liquid chromatography (pages 825–830)

      Maurizio Beggio, Francesca Giuffrida, Pierre-Alain Golay, Kornél Nagy and Frédéric Destaillats

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300039

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fatty acid analysis is conventionally performed by gas–liquid chromatography (GLC) as their fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) derivatives. We developed a method suitable for quantitative analysis of fatty acids in fats and oils by robotic preparation and online GLC analysis of FAME using methanolic potassium hydroxide as transmethylation reagent. The method has been validated on different fats and oils and results obtained show that transmethylation and GLC analysis of fats and oils can be robotized while remaining accurate.fx1

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