European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology

Cover image for Vol. 115 Issue 9

Special Issue: Novel sources of omega-3 for food and feed (Part 1∕2)

September 2013

Volume 115, Issue 9

Pages 965–1084

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Review Article
    7. Short Communications
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 9∕2013

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201370017

  2. Editorial board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Review Article
    7. Short Communications
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 9∕2013

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201370018

  3. In this Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Review Article
    7. Short Communications
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 9∕2013

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201370019

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Review Article
    7. Short Communications
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 9∕2013

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201370020

  5. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Review Article
    7. Short Communications
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communications
    1. Special Collection: Novel Sources of Omega-3 for Food and Feed (Part 1)

      Docosahexaenoic acid from algal oil (pages 965–976)

      Connye N. Kuratko and Norman Salem Jr.

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300060

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Certain algae produce long chain omega-3 fatty acids including eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids as part of normal metabolism. In nature, these fatty acids enter the food chain and are important nutrients for the health of many animals, including humans. Cultured under specific and tightly controlled conditions, these oils are commercially produced for use in infant formula, foods, beverages, and a variety of supplements. EPA and DHA have long been associated with cardiovascular health. More recently the impact of DHA, as the primary n-3 fatty acid in brain and retinal tissue, has been documented. Within membranes, DHA facilitates cell signaling and serves as a precursor to highly bioactive molecules. Because endogenous production is low, levels of DHA in brain, retina, and other tissues do not reach higher levels unless this preformed fatty acid is included in the diet. Most Westernized diets provide low levels of EPA and DHA, making their use in supplements and fortified foods necessary for optimal health.

  6. Short Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Review Article
    7. Short Communications
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communications
    1. Special Collection: Novel Sources of Omega-3 for Food and Feed (Part 1)

      Generating omega-3 rich olive oil by cross breeding (pages 977–981)

      Yasin Ozdemir, Nesrin Aktepe Tangu and Mehmet E. Akcay

      Version of Record online: 23 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300026

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Developing high omega-3 and low omega-6:omega-3 ratio contained olive oil which were generated by olive crossbreeding project.

  7. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Review Article
    7. Short Communications
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communications
    1. Special Collection: Novel Sources of Omega-3 for Food and Feed (Part 1)

      Discarded species in the west Mediterranean sea as sources of omega-3 PUFA (pages 982–989)

      Pedro J. García-Moreno, Raúl Pérez-Gálvez, Rocío Morales-Medina, Antonio Guadix and Emilia M. Guadix

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300021

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lipid content of the discarded species in different seasons.

    2. Regular Articles

      Concentration of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) by selective alcoholysis catalyzed by lipases (pages 990–1004)

      Lorena Martín Valverde, Pedro A. González Moreno, María José Jiménez Callejón, Luis Esteban Cerdán and Alfonso Robles Medina

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300005

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Conversion of EPA (XEPA), DHA (XDHA), and the rest of fatty acids (XREST, average values) in the ethanolysis of sardine oil catalyzed by different lipases. Lipases QLC and QLG converted EPA to the corresponding ethyl ester slower than DHA and much more slower than the rest of fatty acid of the oil. Thus, the EPA purity in the acylglycerol residue was increased.

    3. Physical, chemical, and lubricant properties of Brassicaceae oil (pages 1005–1012)

      Kornsulee Ratanapariyanuch, Johanna Clancy, Shahram Emami, Jeffery Cutler and Martin J. T. Reaney

      Version of Record online: 23 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200422

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      No marked difference was found among wear scar of oil samples without additives. The difference among wear scar widths was related to the additive types. Comparison of oil samples from S. alba, B. rapa, B. napus, and C. sativa oils without additives showed that the decreasing viscosity resulted in increasing wear scar width.

    4. Influence of free fatty acids on oxidative stability in water-in-walnut oil emulsions (pages 1013–1020)

      Jianhua Yi, Zhenbao Zhu, Wenbin Dong, David Julian McClements and Eric Andrew Decker

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200438

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Schematic demonstration of the distribution of saturated fatty acids at the droplet interface in W/O emulsions. (A) Lauric acid with the shortest chain has the highest interfacial activity and is mainly located at the interface, which could make the water droplet interface more negatively charged at aqueous phase pH 7.0. (B) Palmitic acid with a longer chain has lower interfacial activity and a lower proportion of palmitic acid is at the interface of the droplets. In this case, the water droplet interface had less negative charges. (C) Stearic acid with the longest chain has the lowest interfacial activity and is mainly located outside the droplet interface, which could make the water droplet interface least negatively charged.

    5. Lipid compositions of latex and sheet rubber from Hevea brasiliensis depend on clonal origin (pages 1021–1031)

      Siriluck Liengprayoon, Jatuporn Chaiyut, Klanarong Sriroth, Frédéric Bonfils, Jérôme Sainte-Beuve, Eric Dubreucq and Laurent Vaysse

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300023

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lipids were extracted from latex and sheet rubber from 3 Hevea brasiliensis clones. Chromatographic techniques were used for separation and quantification (LC, TLC, GC–FID, GC–MS, and HPLC–MS). The study revealed a clear effect of the clonal origin of latex on lipid composition.

    6. Aroma characterization of flaxseed oils using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-olfactometry (pages 1032–1042)

      Changqing Wei, Wanpeng Xi, Xinyan Nie, Wenyu Liu, Qiang Wang, Beibei Yang and Dong Cao

      Version of Record online: 7 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200397

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Among various types of vegetable oils, flaxseed oil has a distinct flavor. In this study, 60 compounds of flaxseed oil pressed from three cultivars were tentatively identified and semi-quantified by HS-SPME-GC-MS.

    7. NMR-based metabolomic approach for EVOO from secular olive trees of Apulia region (pages 1043–1052)

      Laura Del Coco, Enzo Perri, Gianluigi Cesari, Innocenzo Muzzalupo, Samanta Zelasco, Vito Simeone, Francesco Paolo Schena and Francesco Paolo Fanizzi

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300160

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The 1H NMR spectra of secular aged Apulian olive tree EVOOs were analyzed by several pattern recognition methods, using both unsupervised (PCA) and supervised (OPLS-DA) statistical techniques. Obtained EVOOs could be easily differentiated by OPLS-DA not only depending on the used cultivars but also according to their geographical origin within the different districts of the Apulia region, such to justify a larger biodiversity maintenance of Apulia secular germplasm. Differences in NMR profiles and chemical composition of EVOOs may be explained either by cultivars or geographic areas.

    8. Mass spectrometry to evaluate the effect of the ripening process on phenols of virgin olive oils (pages 1053–1061)

      Verónica Sánchez de Medina, Milad El Riachy, Feliciano Priego-Capote and María Dolores Luque de Castro

      Version of Record online: 24 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300059

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Olive oil phenols are of a great interest since they contribute to autoxidation stability, health properties, and organoleptic characteristics of virgin olive oil. These phenols are considered a key to assess virgin olive oil quality. This study is focused on the effect of the ripening process on the phenolic fraction from a metabolomics point of view. This advanced omics technology (foodomics) applied to plant breeding programs can be one of the pillars to improve products quality.

    9. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of virgin olive oil to improve the process efficiency (pages 1062–1069)

      Maria Lisa Clodoveo, Viviana Durante, Domenico La Notte, Rossana Punzi and Giuseppe Gambacorta

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200426

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The thermal effect of ultrasound leads to a quick heating of olive paste and, consequently, to a reduction of the malaxing time. This effect determines a faster discharge of the malaxer who becomes available for a new process cycle increasing the working capacity of all the devices composing the industrial plant.

    10. Comparative study of two methods (hexane extraction and NMR) for the determination of oil content in an individual olive fruit (pages 1070–1077)

      Adeline Deblangey, Jean-Michel Roger, Bernard Palagos, Gilbert Grenier and Ryad Bendoula

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200359

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The performance of NMR and HIE for the determination of oil content in individual olive fruit has been compared in terms of repeatability, reproducibility, and trueness.

  8. Short Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Review Article
    7. Short Communications
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communications
    1. Regular Articles

      Evaluation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons content in different types of olive and olive pomace oils produced in Turkey and Spain (pages 1078–1084)

      Pelin Günç Ergönül and Sebastián Sánchez

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200398

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chromatogram of a PAHs standard mixture (1000 ng/g) obtained with two different channels corresponding to: (Channel 1) 280 nm of excitation wavelength and 410 nm of emission wavelength; (Channel 2) 256 nm excitation wavelength and 446 nm of emission wavelength. (1) naphthalene; (2) acenaphthene; (3) fluorene; (4) phenanthrene; (5) anthracene; (6) fluoranthene; (7) pyrene; (8) benz[a]anthracene; (9) chrysene; (10) benzo[b]fluoranthene; (11) benzo[k]fluoranthene; (12) benzo[a]pyrene; (13) dibenz[a,h]anthracene; (14) benzo[ghi]perylene; (15) indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION