European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology

Cover image for Vol. 116 Issue 3

March 2014

Volume 116, Issue 3

Pages 237–366

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review Article
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communication
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      Cover Picture: Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 3∕2014

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201470031

  2. Editorial Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review Article
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communication
    1. You have free access to this content
      Editorial Board: Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 3∕2014

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201470032

  3. In this Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review Article
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communication
    1. You have free access to this content
      In this issue

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201470033

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review Article
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communication
    1. You have free access to this content
      Contents: Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 3∕2014

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201470034

  5. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review Article
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communication
    1. You have free access to this content
  6. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review Article
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communication
    1. Influence of ingredients that reduce oil absorption during immersion frying of battered and breaded foods (pages 240–254)

      Robert G. Brannan, Eunice Mah, Maria Schott, Simin Yuan, Katherine L. Casher, Andrew Myers and Christopher Herrick

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201200308

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Theoretical nutritional values for products with different percent oil reduction. Ingredients that reduce the oil absorption of fried battered and breaded products ideally should produce products with less than 35% calories from fat.

  7. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review Article
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communication
    1. Comparative study of DHA-enriched phospholipids and EPA-enriched phospholipids on metabolic disorders in diet-induced-obese C57BL/6J mice (pages 255–265)

      Xiaofang Liu, Jie Cui, Zhaojie Li, Jie Xu, Jingfeng Wang, Changhu Xue and Yuming Wang

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300407

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Marine DHA-enriched phospholipids (DHA-PL) and EPA-enriched phospholipids (EPA-PL) showed equivalent effects on obesity-related glucose intolerance, while the lipid-lowering effects of EPA-PL were superior to DHA-PL. Both DHA-PL and EPA-PL up-regulated genes involved in insulin-sensitizing actions in the adipose tissue and suppressed hepatic SREBP-1c mediated lipogenesis. EPA-PL also significantly activated hepatic PPARα mediated lipolysis.

    2. Tridocosahexaenoyl glycerol purification from docosahexaenoic acid single cell oil (DHASCO) (pages 266–271)

      Elena Venegas-Venegas, José Luis Guil-Guerrero, Miguel Ángel Rincón-Cervera and Rebeca Pilar Ramos-Bueno

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300350

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      DHASCO® is a commercial oil extracted from the marine microalgae Crypthecodinium cohnii. From this oil, a tri-DHA fraction was identified by HPLC and GLC, and further purified by means of a gravimetric normal-phase chromatographic column with silver nitrate-silica gel as stationary phase. This methodology was implemented using food-safe solvents, thus, it could be applied in the alimentary or pharmaceutical industries.

    3. Positional distribution of fatty acids on hoki and tuna oil triglycerides by pancreatic lipase and 13C NMR analysis (pages 272–281)

      Tengku Mohamad Tengku-Rozaina and Edward John Birch

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300357

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Upper left: TLC of pancreatic lipase products under UV. Upper right: GC of FAME from hoki oil. Lower left: NMR instrument. Lower right: 13C NMR of tuna oil in the carbonyl region.

    4. 1,3-Dioleoyl-2-palmitoylglycerol-rich human milk fat substitutes: Production, purification, characterization and modeling of the formulation (pages 282–290)

      Xiao-Li Qin, Jin-Feng Zhong, Yong Hua Wang, Bo Yang, Dong-Ming Lan and Fang-Hua Wang

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300343

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The whole process of the production of HMFSs, including one-step enzymatic synthesis, purification, quality evaluation and physical blending was proposed. It is preference to use OPO-rich TAGs produced by one-step enzymatic process rather than those obtained by multistep enzymatic process as the main ingredient for preparing HMFS with high similarity to HMF. A mathematical model was established for formulating HMFS by blending OPO-rich TAGs product with the selected vegetable oils.

    5. Seed meals as source of fractions with different effects on pancreatic lipase activity (pages 291–299)

      Carolina Shene, María José Spuler, Francisca Acevedo and Mónica Rubilar

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300228

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      Seed meals were fractionated for evaluating their effect on the activity of porcine pancreatic lipase. The activity increased as the concentration of the different fractions increased; however at low concentration of the protein fraction from lupin and linseed the activity was lower than the control. The effect of these protein fractions was dependent on the structure of emulsions and protein treatments such as pepsin digestion, thermal denaturation and high pressure homogenization.

    6. The effect of citric acid and ascorbyl palmitate in palm oil enriched with heme iron: A model for iron fortification in bakery products (pages 300–310)

      Mercedes Alemán, Ricard Bou, Alba Tres, Javier Polo, Rafael Codony and Francesc Guardiola

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300007

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A mixture of refined palm oil and heme iron, as a model for iron fortification in bakery products, was used to study the effectiveness of ascorbyl palmitate (AP) and citric acid (CA) to improve the oxidative stability. Among the combinations and doses of the antioxidants assayed, the addition of AP at 400 mg/kg is the most effective.

    7. Effect of mustard on lipid oxidation in model pork meat product (pages 311–318)

      Małgorzata Karwowska and Zbigniew J. Dolatowski

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300296

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The effect of ground mustard seed on the formation of cholesterol oxidation products and malondialdehyde was evaluated by comparing their concentration in fresh and stored cooked model pork meat product prepared with addition of two levels of mustard seed and without this flavoring. The sensory quality of product was also determined using quantitative descriptive analysis.

    8. Supercritical fluid extraction of wheat bran oil: Study of extraction yield and oil quality (pages 319–327)

      Sara Rebolleda, Sagrario Beltrán, María Teresa Sanz and María Luisa González-SanJosé

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300323

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Influence of extraction pressure and temperature on ABTS•+ scavenging capacity of wheat bran oil.

    9. Production of glycerol monolaurate-enriched monoacylglycerols by lipase-catalyzed glycerolysis from coconut oil (pages 328–335)

      Baoping Zha, Zhongwei Chen, Li Wang, Ren Wang, Zhengxing Chen and Lianhe Zheng

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300243

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Enzymatically catalyzed glycerolysis in microemulsion system and molecular distillation were used to produce glycerol monolaurate-enriched MAGs from coconut oil. The quantitative analysis of glycerol monolaurate, MAGs, DAGs, and TAGs were conducted using an HPLC. In the final product, glycerides (97.6% MAGs and 2.0% DAGs) with glycerol monolaurate content of 60.0% and acid value of 0.02 mg KOH/g were obtained.

    10. Production of sophorolipids synthesized on castor oil with glucose and glycerol by using Starmerella bombicola (ATCC 22214) (pages 336–343)

      Akash Bhangale, Sushant Wadekar, Sandip Kale, Diptinarayan Bhowmick and Amit Pratap

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300236

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Synthetic pathway of producing sophorolipids by using Starmerella bombicola on castor oil with glucose and castor oil with glycerine as a substrate.

    11. Catalytic synthesis and characterization of phenol-branched-chain fatty acid isomers* (pages 344–351)

      Helen L. Ngo, Pamela S. Fox, Alberto Nuñez, Robert A. Moreau and Michael J. Haas

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300227

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A catalytic approach for the addition of phenol to the olefinic site of oleic acid using the H-ferrierite zeolite.

    12. Oxidative treatments of solid olive residues: Effects on phenolic and fatty acid fractions (pages 352–359)

      Fabio Girardi, Angelo Cichelli, Enzo Perri, Carla Basti and Nicola d'Alessandro

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300083

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We have considered the effects of several chemical treatments, always involving H2O2, of pomaces of different origins, for the oxidising of both their phenols and their residual triglycerides. The Fenton system is the method that can oxidise the phenolic fraction, while leaving only traces of residual H2O2. Among the fatty acids contained in the triglyceride fraction, linoleic acid was largely oxidized, although only in pomace with a low water content and in the presence of the Fenton treatment.

  8. Short Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review Article
    8. Research Articles
    9. Short Communication
    1. Characteristics of the lipid and fatty acid compositions of the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas: The trophic relationship between the squid and its prey (pages 360–366)

      Hiroaki Saito, Mitsuo Sakai and Toshie Wakabayashi

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300230

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Markedly high levels of both 20:5n-3 (icosapentaenoic acid, EPA) and 22:6n-3 (DHA) with noticeable levels of 20:4n-6 (arachidonic acid, ARA) were observed in phosphatidylethanolamine, while DHA was found as a major component in phosphatidylcholine. This implies a concentration of these PUFA in the tissues of Dosidicus gigas as a top predator, similar to highly migratory fishes. D. gigas is a healthful marine food containing high levels of EPA and DHA with ARA.

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