European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology

Cover image for Vol. 116 Issue 4

April 2014

Volume 116, Issue 4

Pages 367–503

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Research Articles
    8. Meeting Report
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      Cover Picture: Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 4∕2014

      Article first published online: 3 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201470041

  2. Editorial Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Research Articles
    8. Meeting Report
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      Editorial Board: Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 4∕2014

      Article first published online: 3 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201470042

  3. In this Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Research Articles
    8. Meeting Report
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      In this issue

      Article first published online: 3 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201470043

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Research Articles
    8. Meeting Report
    1. You have free access to this content
      Contents: Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 4∕2014

      Article first published online: 3 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201470044

  5. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Research Articles
    8. Meeting Report
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  6. Research Articles

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    4. In this Issue
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    1. Antioxidant activity of monooleyl and dioleyl p-coumarates in in vitro and biological model systems (pages 370–379)

      Jiankang Wang and Fereidoon Shahidi

      Article first published online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300348

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      Three-dimensional chemical structures of monooleyl p-coumarate (right) and dioleyl p-coumarate (left).

    2. Micronutrient content of cold-pressed, hot-pressed, solvent extracted and RBD canola oil: Implications for nutrition and quality (pages 380–387)

      Saeed Mirzaee Ghazani, Guadalupe García-Llatas and Alejandro G. Marangoni

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300288

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chromatogram of healthy minor components extracted from canola oil samples.

    3. Comparison of the antioxidant capacity of lipid-soluble compounds in selected cold-pressed oils using photochemiluminescence assay (PCL) and DPPH method (pages 388–394)

      Maria Sielicka, Maria Małecka and Małgorzata Purłan

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300356

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      Antioxidant capacity of lipid-soluble compounds of analyzed cold-pressed oils measured using photochemiluminescence and DPPH methods (mM Trolox/L oil).† †Means with different letters indicate significant differences (p<0.05) in the same line.

    4. Volatile compounds generated in corn oil stored at room temperature. Presence of toxic compounds (pages 395–406)

      Encarnación Goicoechea and María D. Guillén

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300244

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      Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) followed by gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was employed to study the headspace composition of corn oil (maize oil) samples stored at room temperature in closed receptacles with limited amounts of air for different periods of time

    5. Volatile compounds as indicators of conjugated and unconjugated linoleic acid thermal oxidation (pages 407–412)

      Lina Cossignani, Laura Giua, Maria Stella Simonetti and Francesca Blasi

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300205

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      Time course of aldehyde formation during the heating of CLA model systems (FFA-CLA, free fatty acids; Me-CLA, methyl esters; Tri-CLA, homogeneous TAGs). Volatile compounds have been analyzed by SPME-GC–MS.

    6. Isolation and purification of plastochromanol-8 for HPLC quantitative determinations (pages 413–422)

      Aleksander Siger, Piotr Kachlicki, Jarosław Czubiński, Dominika Polcyn, Krzysztof Dwiecki and Małgorzata Nogala-Kalucka

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300297

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      The study describes isolation and semi-preparative HPLC scale purification of plastochromanol-8 (PC-8). The PC-8 standard was obtained from flaxseed oil. The purity of obtained PC-8 standard was 93.06% determined by UV–Vis detection. The HPLC/MSn fragmentation pattern of PC-8 side chain resulted in the successive release of eight isoprene fragments which confirmed the proper structure identification. The established PC-8 molar absorption coefficient (3616.5 M−1cm−1) will allow the precise quantitative analysis of this compound in real samples without the use of standard.

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      Enzymatic synthesis of amino sugar fatty acid esters (pages 423–428)

      Martin Pöhnlein, Christin Slomka, Olga Kukharenko, Tobias Gärtner, Lars O. Wiemann, Volker Sieber, Christoph Syldatk and Rudolf Hausmann

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300380

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      Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of amino sugar fatty acid esters using two different amino sugars led to the formation of two novel glycolipids. Structure elucidation was performed via NMR. Further, the influence of substrate hydrophobicity and solubility on the synthesis was investigated.

    8. Arachidonic acid synthesis from biodiesel-derived waste by Mortierella alpina (pages 429–437)

      Emiliya G. Dedyukhina, Tatyana I. Chistyakova, Aleksei A. Mironov, Svetlana V. Kamzolova, Igor G. Morgunov and Mikhail B. Vainshtein

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300358

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      Arachidonic acid synthesis by Mortierella alpina from biodiesel-derived waste.

    9. Gas assisted pressing on pilot scale (pages 438–447)

      Marcus Müller, Arne Pietsch and Rudolf Eggers

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300321

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      CO2 assisted pressing is a promising technique to efficiently produce solvent free vegetable oils from oilseeds. In linear pressing mode, oil yields for flaked rapeseeds are increased up to 30% due to CO2-assistance. The yield increase is even better when press cake is used.

    10. Formulation, antibacterial activity, and cytotoxicity of 1-monoacylglycerol microemulsions (pages 448–457)

      Ševčíková Petra, Kašpárková Věra, Hauerlandová Iva, Humpolíček Petr, Kuceková Zdeňka and Buňková Leona

      Article first published online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300171

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      Antibacterial effect of all studied 1-MAG microemulsions (MEs; 1-MAG C10:0, C11:0, C12:0, and C14:0) was found to be better against gram-positive bacteria in comparison with gram-negative strains. The best performance was recorded for the 1-MAG C12:0 ME, exhibiting satisfactory growth reduction of almost all tested gram-positive bacteria, with the exception of Staphylococcus aureus. Antibacterial effect of ME was assigned to synergic action of 1-MAG, ethanol and surfactant, which all form ME droplets.

    11. Hybrid nanocomposites based on POSS and networks of methacrylated camelina oil and various PEG derivatives (pages 458–469)

      Brindusa Balanuca, Adriana Lungu, Ana-Maria Hanganu, Liane Raluca Stan, Eugeniu Vasile and Horia Iovu

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300370

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The diagram depicts the used strategy to develop novel photocured organic-inorganic nanocomposites based on networks of methacrylated camelina oil (MCO) and various hydrophilic dimethacrylated poly(ethylene glycol) derivatives (PEG-DMA) reinforced with POSS compounds bearing one or eight polymerizable moieties (POSS1/POSS8). The innovative hybrid oil-based materials with various crosslinking density were investigated in terms of wettability (contact angle and water uptake), structural (FTIR), mechanical (compression tests), thermal (DMA, TGA) and morphological (SEM) features.

    12. Low-temperature chemical glycerolysis to produce diacylglycerols by heterogeneous base catalyst (pages 470–476)

      Nanjing Zhong, Xiaoting Deng, Jianrong Huang, Li Xu, Kun Hu and Yongqing Gao

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300438

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      MgO-supported KOH (KOH–MgO) was employed as heterogeneous catalyst for the low-temperature chemical glycerolysis to produce DAG, and it was found effective for the glycerolysis reaction. 41.8 ± 0.8 wt% of DAG was obtained after 12 h reaction at 80°C. The developed heterogeneous catalysis process is advantageous over the homogeneous catalysis in terms of the post-reaction treatment.

    13. Diester monomers from methyl oleate and proline via tandem hydroaminomethylation-esterification sequence with homogeneous catalyst recycling using TMS-technique (pages 477–485)

      Arno Behr, Thomas Seidensticker and Andreas J. Vorholt

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300224

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The hydroaminomethylation of methyl oleate with proline is shown for the first time. The reaction sequence has been extended to the in situ esterification of the proline moiety to form a bifunctional molecule. These two renewables are combined in an atom economic orthogonal tandem reaction sequence to diesters, which potentially find application in polymers. The precious metal catalyst is successfully recycled using thermomorphic solvent systems consisting of methanol plus alkanes and is stable for at least three recycling runs.

    14. Preformulation and development of chemically stable lipid emulsions containing a novel taxane derivative, TM-2 (pages 486–496)

      Jianli Shi, Xi Chen, Yuechen Gu, Xi Hu, Ling Zhang, Yan Li, Cuifang Cai and Xing Tang

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300371

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      TM-2 is a novel semisynthetic taxoid compound. This paper describes an investigation of the physicochemical properties of TM-2 to determine the use of lipid emulsions as suitable drug carriers. TM-2 is a poorly water-soluble drug like other taxanes and its solubility in PBS with a pH of 3.0–8.0 is under 1.0 µg/mL. However, it has a much higher solubility in oils than the taxanes, docetaxel and paclitaxel. The partition coefficient of TM-2 had no obvious correlation with pH, for the calculated value of log P was from 4.05 ± 0.04 to 4.41 ± 0.07 (n = 3) between pH 3.0 and 8.0. The stability of TM-2 in aqueous solutions and oils was investigated and the results showed that the drug degradation took place mostly in the water phase. Lipid emulsions, consisting of oil and water phases, have been found to be safe and excellent drug carriers. By incorporating the drugs into the interior oil phase and the oil–water interfacial film of o/w emulsions, direct contact of the drug with body fluids and tissues is avoided. Thus, the drug is protected from degradation and possible side effects are minimized. All the results from the preformulation study indicated that the characteristics of TM-2 made it an excellent candidate for o/w emulsions. During the preparation of TM-2 lipid emulsions, weak acid environment, high ionic strength and low temperature had appreciable effects on the stability of TM-2 solutions. An emulsion formulation of TM-2 which was stable enough to undergo sterilization was successfully developed and optimized. The degradation of TM-2 in emulsions followed pseudo-first-order degradation kinetics. The relationship between ln k and 1/T was determined by linear regression and the linearity coefficient of the regression was 0.9988. Using the Arrhenius equation, the shelf-life of TM-2 in lipid emulsion was estimated to be 2665.5 days at 4°C, which was much longer than that of 113.0 days in aqueous solution. So, TM-2 lipid emulsion was clearly superior to the TM-2 aqueous solution in terms of stability.

  7. Meeting Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Commentary
    7. Research Articles
    8. Meeting Report
    1. You have free access to this content

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