European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology

Cover image for Vol. 116 Issue 5

May 2014

Volume 116, Issue 5

Pages 505–666

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communications
    8. Special Feature
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 5∕2014

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201470051

  2. Editorial Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communications
    8. Special Feature
    1. You have free access to this content
      Editorial Board: Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 5∕2014

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201470052

  3. In this Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communications
    8. Special Feature
    1. You have free access to this content
      In this issue

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201470053

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communications
    8. Special Feature
    1. You have free access to this content
      Contents: Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 5∕2014

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201470054

  5. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communications
    8. Special Feature
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Polyunsaturated fatty acids modify expression of TGF-β in a co-culture model ultilising human colorectal cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to Lactobacillus gasseri, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus (pages 505–513)

      Kerry L Bentley-Hewitt, Cloe Erika De Guzman, Juliet Ansell, Tafadzwa Mandimika, Arjan Narbad and Elizabeth K Lund

      Article first published online: 31 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300337

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      Modulation of TGF-β1 and IL-8 gene expression in HT29 and HT29-MTX cells co-cultured with peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The bottom compartment illustrates HT29 and HT29-MTX gene expression (TGF-β1 and IL-8) changes following treatment of PUFAs: arachidonic acid (AA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), with or without subsequent exposure to L. gasseri compared to no PUFA treatment. The top compartment illustrates HT29 and HT29-MTX gene expression (TGF-β1 and IL-8) changes following exposure to L. gasseri, S. aureus and E. coli (no PUFA treatment) compared to control cells that were not exposed to bacteria.

    2. Alterations of lipid profile are a risk factor for venous thromboembolism and thrombotic complications (pages 514–520)

      Aránzazu García-Raso, Gabriela Simona Ene and Pilar Llamas Sillero

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300414

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      Alterations of LDL and HDL levels are related with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism, thrombotic recurrence and post-thrombotic syndrome.

    3. Evaluation of a rice bran oil-derived spread as a functional ingredient (pages 521–531)

      Erica L. Bakota, Jill K. Winkler-Moser and Sean X. Liu

      Article first published online: 2 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300259

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      A semisolid fraction derived from solvent fractionation of rice bran oil was evaluated for its utility as a functional food ingredient. This fraction was incorporated into baked goods, specifically bread (upper left), and granola (upper right). The material was also added to a frying oil, and tortilla chips (bottom center) were fried in the supplemented oil.

    4. Characterisation of high 1,3-distearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerol content stearins produced by acidolysis of high oleic sunflower oil with stearic and palmitic acids (pages 532–547)

      Joydeep Ray, Kevin W. Smith, Krishnadath Bhaggan, Zoltan K. Nagy and Andrew G. F. Stapley

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300282

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      Evolution of XRD patterns of high StOSt stearins crystallised at 20°C over 30 min.

    5. An improved method for determining the phosphorus content in vegetable oils (pages 548–552)

      Bin Chen, Xia Xiao, Rong Li, Wanli Zhao, Kaidi Yang, Guoliang Chen and Xiaoxun Ma

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300378

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      An improved method was developed for oil sample preparation in determining phosphorus content. Compared with the AOCS Official Method Ca 12-55, the method displayed less pretreatment time, better efficiency of charring and ashing, and good precision and accuracy.

    6. Physico-chemical properties and fatty acid profile of seed oils from pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) extracted by cold pressing (pages 553–562)

      Ali Khoddami, Yaakob Bin Che Man and Thomas H. Roberts

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300416

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      Pomegranate seeds from fruit processing can be dried and cold pressed to yield a highly unsaturated oil with potential as an edible oil and with properties suited to industrial uses such as in tanning and ink production

    7. Cold-pressed Japanese quince (Chaenomeles japonica (Thunb.) Lindl. ex Spach) seed oil as a rich source of α-tocopherol, carotenoids and phenolics: A comparison of the composition and antioxidant activity with nine other plant oils (pages 563–570)

      Paweł Górnaś, Aleksander Siger, Karina Juhņeviča, Gunārs Lācis, Elga Šnē and Dalija Segliņa

      Article first published online: 26 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300425

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      The study describes a new cold-pressed Japanese quince (Chaenomeles japonica (Thunb.) Lindl. ex Spach) seed oil, recovered from a by-product of fruit processing, compared to nine other plant oils. The Japanese quince seed oil had the highest amounts of tocopherols, β-carotene, and total phenolic compounds (726.20; 10.77 and 64.03 mg/kg, respectively) from all study oils. The Japanese quince seed oil was dominated by palmitic acid (10.07%), oleic acid (34.55%), and linoleic acid (52.35%). The Japanese quince seed oil, due to a very similar composition of both fatty acids and tocopherols as in sunflower oil, could be used as an alternative substitute of sunflower oil.

    8. Beef tallow as an alternative to fish oil in diets for gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) juveniles: Effects on fish performance, tissue fatty acid composition, health and flesh nutritional value (pages 571–583)

      José A. Pérez, Covadonga Rodríguez, Ana Bolaños, Juana R. Cejas and Antonio Lorenzo

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300457

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      Beef tallow has been successfully employed to partially substitute fish oil in aquafeeds for gilthead sea bream juveniles without significantly affecting fish performance and health while ensuring flesh quality as a healthy food option for human consumption.

    9. Ovary and egg fatty acid composition of greater amberjack broodstock (Seriola dumerili) fed different dietary fatty acids profiles (pages 584–595)

      Deiene Rodríguez-Barreto, Salvador Jerez, Juana R. Cejas, M. Virginia Martin, Nieves G. Acosta, Ana Bolaños and Antonio Lorenzo

      Article first published online: 26 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300462

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      In this study was assessed the effect of an experimental diet (ED), on the fatty acid profile of ovary and eggs of Seriola dumerli broodstock, in contrast to a non-specific commercial diet (nsCD), taking wild fish as a positive reference. Our result shows that ovary of fish fed the experimental diet displayed a fatty acid profile that more resembles that of wild fish. From the cultured fish, only fish fed ED spawn. Egg fatty acid composition from fish fed ED experience slight variations along the spawning season with eggs collected in the late season being significantly different to those obtained in early and mid- season.

    10. Lipid and sensory quality of canned Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar): Effect of the use of different seaweed extracts as covering liquids (pages 596–605)

      Jaime Ortiz, Juan P. Vivanco and Santiago P. Aubourg

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300239

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      The addition of four selected seaweed extracts (cochayuyo, sea lettuce, ulte and red luche) as covering liquids in canned salmon was a good alternative to prevent or delay their deterioration, without the use of synthetic antioxidants such BHT or BHA. The application of this strategy improved the lipid and sensory quality parameters of canned Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) muscle in relation with standard salmon without seaweed extract. For each sampling day, three cans from each treatment were analyzed periodically, up to reach 140 days of storage at 40°C. The sensory and lipid parameters that were measured are: fatty acids content (saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated), polyene index (PI), peroxide value (PV), p-anisidine value (pAV), astaxanthin content (AX), total tocopherols content, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), and sensory indicators of “characteristic flavor” and “rancid odor.” All chemical parameters measured (fatty acids, PI, PV, pAV, AX, total tocopherols, and TVB-N) showed significant differences between all treatments and throughout storage time. Sensory parameters did not show significant differences between canned salmons packed with different covering liquids; and they were always into acceptable limits.

    11. Antioxidant activities and interactions of α- and γ-tocopherols within canola and soybean oil emulsions (pages 606–617)

      Jill K. Winkler-Moser, Amy Logan and Erica L. Bakota

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300401

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Increase in peroxide values in oil-in-water emulsions with either α- or γ- tocopherols.

    12. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Enrichment of stearidonic acid from echium oil via a two-step lipase-catalyzed esterification (pages 618–626)

      Ji Yeon Baik, Da Som No, Se-Wook Oh and In-Hwan Kim

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300452

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      Enrichment of stearidonic acid from echium oil was successfully achieved using a two-step enzymatic esterification method. Stearidonic acid content increased fourfold from 14.3% to 54.1%, and gamma linolenic acid was also enriched together with stearidonic acid.

    13. Scalable synthesis of highly pure 2-monoolein by enzymatic ethanolysis (pages 627–634)

      Xiaosan Wang, Li Liang, Zhenzhen Yu, Lilian Rui, Qingzhe Jin and Xingguo Wang

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201400004

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      In this study, an enzymatic method for the synthesis of highly pure 2-monoolein by ethanolysis of oleic acid-rich oil is reported.

    14. Interactive effects of salinity, high light, and nitrogen starvation on fatty acid and carotenoid profiles in Nannochloropsis oceanica CCALA 804 (pages 635–644)

      Alexei Solovchenko, Alexander Lukyanov, Olga Solovchenko, Shoshana Didi-Cohen, Sammy Boussiba and Inna Khozin-Goldberg

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300456

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      Under high light, cultivation on NaCl-free media appeared to be beneficial for biomass and EPA accumulation in the oleaginous microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica. Nitrogen-starvation promoted total fatty acid accumulation on the background of a marked decline in EPA. Regardless of cultivation conditions, the stress-induced changes in carotenoid and fatty acid profile were highly coordinated.

    15. Improved zeolite regeneration processes for preparing saturated branched-chain fatty acids (pages 645–652)

      Helen L. Ngo

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300315

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      Ferrierite zeolite solid is an excellent catalyst for the skeletal isomerization of unsaturated linear-chain fatty acids to unsaturated branched-chain fatty acids follow by hydrogenation to give saturated branched-chain fatty acids (i.e., isostearic acid). The zeolite catalyst can be successfully used for at least 20 times.

  6. Short Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communications
    8. Special Feature
    1. Separation and identification of lipid classes by normal phase LC-ESI/MS/MS on a cyanopropyl column (pages 653–658)

      Petter Olsson, Jan Holmbäck, Ulrika Nilsson and Bengt Herslöf

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300291

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      In order to establish a versatile and convenient method for the analysis of lipids, electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) was applied to a HPLC separation on a cyanopropyl-bonded stationary phase. A binary gradient mobile phase system consisting of hexane, toluene, methanol and a stable electrospray yielding sodium adduct ions could be used to generate specific product ions in MS/MS mode. By applying the LC/ESI-MS/MS method on an egg yolk sample, 29 different molecular species of phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylcholines, and lysophosphatidylcholines could be detected within 25 min.

    2. Cationic derivative of polyprenol, a potential component of liposomal drug carriers, does not alter renal function in rats (pages 659–662)

      Olga Gawrys, Krzysztof Hubert Olszyński, Katarzyna Gawarecka, Ewa Swiezewska, Tadeusz Chojnacki, Marek Masnyk, Marek Chmielewski and Elżbieta Kompanowska-Jezierska

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201300489

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      Liposomes built from DOPE and APren-7, could find application in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industry, as a drug or active substance carriers, but first there is a need to examine their toxicity. Kidneys are particularly vulnerable and susceptible to numerous injuries caused by exogenous drugs and toxins, thus we studied impact of newly designed liposomal carriers on renal haemodynamics and function of Sprague–Dawley rats. Diagram depicting renal blood flows of rats treated for 4 weeks with: L – liposomes, LP – liposomes with APren-7, W – water solvent; CBF – cortical blood flow, OMBF – outer medullary blood flow; IMBF – inner medullary blood flow (measured with laser-Doppler probes).

  7. Special Feature

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. In this Issue
    5. Contents
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communications
    8. Special Feature
    1. Prostate cancer, lipids, and statins (pages 663–666)

      Harumi Okuyama, Tomohito Hamazaki and Shinkan Tokudome

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ejlt.201400056

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