Direct Nucleophilic SN1-Type Reactions of Alcohols

Authors

  • Enrico Emer,

    1. ALMA MATER STUDIORUM, Università di Bologna, Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician”, via Selmi 2, 40126, Bologna, Italy, Fax: +39-051-2099456
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  • Riccardo Sinisi,

    1. ALMA MATER STUDIORUM, Università di Bologna, Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician”, via Selmi 2, 40126, Bologna, Italy, Fax: +39-051-2099456
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  • Montse Guiteras Capdevila,

    1. ALMA MATER STUDIORUM, Università di Bologna, Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician”, via Selmi 2, 40126, Bologna, Italy, Fax: +39-051-2099456
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  • Diego Petruzziello,

    1. ALMA MATER STUDIORUM, Università di Bologna, Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician”, via Selmi 2, 40126, Bologna, Italy, Fax: +39-051-2099456
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  • Francesco De Vincentiis,

    1. ALMA MATER STUDIORUM, Università di Bologna, Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician”, via Selmi 2, 40126, Bologna, Italy, Fax: +39-051-2099456
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  • Pier Giorgio Cozzi

    1. ALMA MATER STUDIORUM, Università di Bologna, Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician”, via Selmi 2, 40126, Bologna, Italy, Fax: +39-051-2099456
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Abstract

In 2005, the ACS Green Chemistry Institute (GCI) and the global pharmaceutical corporations developed the ACS GCI Pharmaceutical Roundtable to encourage the development of green chemistry and green engineering in the pharmaceutical industry. The Roundtable has established a list of key research areas including the direct nucleophilic reactions of alcohols. The substitution of activated alcohols is a frequently used approach for the preparation of active pharmaceutical ingredients. Alcohols are transformed into the reactive halides or sulfonate esters, thereby allowing their reaction with nucleophiles. Although the direct nucleophilic substitution of an alcohol should be an attractive process, as one of the byproducts from the reaction yields water, hydroxide is a poor leaving group that hinders the reaction. Recently, the direct substitution of allylic, benzylic, and tertiary alcohols has been achieved through an SN1 reaction with catalytic amounts of Brønsted or Lewis acids. In this review, the approaches leading to a greener process are examined in detail, and the advances achieved to date in this important transformation are presented.

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