The impact of individualistic and collectivistic orientation on the judgment of self-presentation

Authors


Fang Fang Chen, Department of Psychology, University of Delaware, Wolf Hall, Newark, DE 19716, USA.

E-mail: xiyu@psych.udel.edu

Abstract

The aims of this paper are two-fold: (i) to examine the impact of audience individualism and collectivism orientation on the judgment of strategic self-presentations and (ii) to test whether audience individualism and collectivism orientation would affect the importance of likeability and competence in determining social outcomes. In two studies, participants evaluated modest and boastful presentations in an achievement context. It was found that the more collectivistic the audience was, the more likely the modest presenter was to be rated as likable, competent, and deserving of a desirable social outcome. In contrast, the more individualistic the audience was, the more likely the boastful presenter was to be rated as likeable, competent, and deserving of a desirable social outcome. The importance of likeability and competence in predicting the final social outcome was moderated by audience individualism and collectivism orientation. Likeability was more important in deciding the social outcome for those who were more collectivistic than for those who were less so (Study 1). Competence was more important in determining the social outcome for those who were more individualistic (Study 2). These studies build a potential theoretical bridge between social influence and social perception/social judgment literature. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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