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Determination of fluoroacetate and fluoride in blood serum by capillary zone electrophoresis using capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection

Authors

  • Denis Tadeu Rajh Vidal,

    1. Departamento de Química Fundamental, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
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  • Marcio Antonio Augelli,

    1. Universidade Estadual Paulista – UNESP, São Paulo, Brazil
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  • Guilherme Minoru Hotta,

    1. Departamento de Química Fundamental, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
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  • Fernando Silva Lopes,

    1. Departamento de Química Fundamental, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
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  • Claudimir Lucio do Lago

    Corresponding author
    1. Departamento de Química Fundamental, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
    2. Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Bioanalítica, Campinas – SP, São Paulo, Brazil
    • Instituto de Química – Universidade de São Paulo Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 748, CEP 05508-000, São Paulo (SP), Brazil Fax: +55-11-3091-3781
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Abstract

Fluoroacetate is a highly toxic species naturally found in plants and in commercial products (compound 1080) for population control of several undesirable animal species. However, it is non-selective and toxic to many other animals including humans, and thus its detection is very important for forensic purposes. This paper presents a sensitive and fast method for the determination of fluoroacetate in blood serum using capillary electrophoresis with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection. Serum blood samples were treated with ethanol to remove proteins. The samples were analyzed in BGE containing 15 mmol/L histidine and 30 mmol/L gluconic acid (pH 3.85). The calibration curve was linear up to 75 μmol/L (R2=0.9995 for N=12). The detection limit in the blood serum was 0.15 mg/kg, which is smaller than the lethal dose for humans and other animals. Fluoride, a metabolite of the fluoroacetate defluorination, could also be detected for levels greater than 20 μmol/L, when polybrene was used for reversion of the EOF. CTAB and didecyldimethylammonium bromide are not useful for this task because of the severe reduction of the fluoride level. However, no interference was observed for fluoroacetate.

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