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Multi-photon structuring of native polymers: A case study for structuring natural proteins

Authors

  • Michael Gebinoga,

    1. Department of Nanobiosystem Technology, Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau, Germany
    2. Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies MacroNano®, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau, Germany
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  • Julia Katzmann,

    1. Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies MacroNano®, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau, Germany
    2. Institute of Physics, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau, Germany
    Current affiliation:
    1. Fraunhofer Institut für Zerstörungsfreie Prüfverfahren (IZFP), Dresden, Germany
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  • Uta Fernekorn,

    1. Department of Nanobiosystem Technology, Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau, Germany
    2. Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies MacroNano®, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau, Germany
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  • Jörg Hampl,

    1. Department of Nanobiosystem Technology, Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau, Germany
    2. Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies MacroNano®, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau, Germany
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  • Frank Weise,

    1. Department of Nanobiosystem Technology, Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau, Germany
    2. Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies MacroNano®, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau, Germany
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  • Maren Klett,

    1. Department of Nanobiosystem Technology, Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau, Germany
    2. Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies MacroNano®, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau, Germany
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  • Annette Läffert,

    1. Department of Nanobiosystem Technology, Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau, Germany
    2. Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies MacroNano®, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau, Germany
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  • Thomas A. Klar,

    1. Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies MacroNano®, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau, Germany
    2. Institute of Physics, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau, Germany
    Current affiliation:
    1. Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Linz, Austria
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  • Andreas Schober

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Nanobiosystem Technology, Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau, Germany
    2. Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies MacroNano®, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau, Germany
    • Correspondence: Dr. Andreas Schober (andreas.schober@tu-ilmenau.de), Department of Nanobiosystemtechnology, Ilmenau University of Technology, Weimarerstr. 32, 98693 Ilmenau, Germany

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Abstract

The trend of mimicking the real biological world has created an intensive search for methods that are able to engineer 3D-structured biological environments using nano- and micro-system technologies. Recently published methods show the design of 3D structures by multi-photon induced polymerization of artificial polymers, such as chemically modified natural polymers. However, limitations of this approach are the long processing time and the fact that no native polymers have been used up to date. In this communication, a case study of multi-photon structuring of unmodified, native proteins (e.g. collagen and fibrinogen) and liquids, such as natural human blood, or cell culture medium supplements, such as fetal calf serum, is presented. Based on a computer-assisted process, the structures are polymerized precisely. Even adhesion and gluing of cells with this technique are possible. These encouraging results open new avenues for further inquiry, which are discussed in the paper.

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