Stem cell engineering in bioreactors for large-scale bioprocessing

Authors

  • Ning Liu,

    1. William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Irvine Scientific, Santa Ana, CA, USA
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  • Ru Zang,

    1. William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Genzyme Corporation, Framingham, MA, USA
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  • Shang-Tian Yang,

    Corresponding author
    1. William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
    • Correspondence: Dr. Shang-Tian Yang (yang.15@osu.edu), William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, 140 West 19th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.

      Additional correspondence: Dr. Yan Li (yli@eng.fsu.edu), Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Florida State University, 2525 Pottsdamer St., Tallahassee, FL 32310, USA.

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  • Yan Li

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA
    • Correspondence: Dr. Shang-Tian Yang (yang.15@osu.edu), William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, 140 West 19th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.

      Additional correspondence: Dr. Yan Li (yli@eng.fsu.edu), Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Florida State University, 2525 Pottsdamer St., Tallahassee, FL 32310, USA.

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Abstract

Stem cells are promising cell sources for many biomedical applications including cell therapy, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery. However, the commonly used static tissue culture vessels can only generate a low number of cells. To provide an adequate number of stem cells for clinical applications, a scalable process based on bioreactors is needed. Stem cells can be either cultured as free cells/aggregates in suspension or as adherent cells on the solid substrates. Based on the cell property, different bioreactor configurations are developed to better expand stem cells while maintaining their differentiation capacity. In this review, several major types of bioreactor systems and their applications in stem cell engineering are discussed. Continued advancements in bioprocess and bioreactor research and development are important to engineer stem cells for their use in biomedical applications.

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