Engineering in Life Sciences

Cover image for Engineering in Life Sciences

August, 2006

Volume 6, Issue 4

Pages 335–420

  1. Overview

    1. Top of page
    2. Overview
    3. Contents
    4. Full Papers
    5. Communication
    1. Overview Contents: Eng. Life Sci. 4/2006 (page 335)

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/elsc.200690008

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Overview
    3. Contents
    4. Full Papers
    5. Communication
    1. Contents: Eng. Life Sci. 4/2006 (pages 337–339)

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/elsc.200690009

  3. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Overview
    3. Contents
    4. Full Papers
    5. Communication
    1. Use of Hydrocyclones for Mammalian Cell Retention: Separation Efficiency and Cell Viability (Part 1) (pages 347–354)

      E. A. Elsayed, R. A. Medronho, R. Wagner and W.-D. Deckwer

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/elsc.200620137

      Perfusion cultures are widely applied to achieve high densities of mammalian cells. They essentially require a cell retention device. Among the many proposals in this regard, simply constructed hydrocyclones proved to be favorable tools of high efficiency for cell retention without damaging cells when operated properly.

    2. Bioleaching of Heavy Metal Polluted Sediment: Influence of Temperature and Oxygen (Part 1) (pages 355–363)

      C. Löser, A. Zehnsdorf, K. Görsch and H. Seidel

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/elsc.200520141

      Heavy metal polluted sediment can be remediated by solid-bed bioleaching: elemental sulfur added to the sediment is oxidized to sulfuric acid which dissolves the heavy metals. The most crucial parameter in this process is the temperature. Here, the kinetics and stoichiometry of bioleaching have been studied depending on temperature and oxygen.

    3. Bioleaching of Heavy Metal Polluted Sediment: Influence of Sediment Properties (Part 2) (pages 364–371)

      C. Löser, A. Zehnsdorf, P. Hoffmann and H. Seidel

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/elsc.200520142

      Applying bioleaching on sediments is property-dependent. The effect of sediment properties on the kinetics of bioleaching was studied with six sediments of different origin. To simulate diverse buffer capacities under well-defined conditions, the sediments were supplemented with varying amounts of ground limestone.

    4. Tissue Cultured Mountain Ginseng Adventitious Roots™: Safety and Toxicity Evaluation (pages 372–383)

      G. Sivakumar, K. W. Yu, J. S. Lee, J. K. Kang, H. L. Lee, W. J. Kim and K. Y. Paek

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/elsc.200520139

      Scientists start focusing on Panax ginseng – the world's best-known herb which has been used medicinally in Asia for more than 5000 years. The toxicity and consumption safety of Tissue cultured mountain ginseng adventitious roots™ (TCMGARs) powder, in view of a planned release as a functional food supplement, was evaluated.

    5. Inactivation Effects on Proteins in a Needle-free Vaccine Injector (pages 384–393)

      A. S. Ziegler, E. Schluecker, P. Reichel-Lesnianski, N. Alt and G. Lee

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/elsc.200620138

      Protein inactivation was investigated in a needle-free injector device. Not only the protein stressing process steps were examined in detail, but also more general questions of fundamental interest for life sciences were addressed, among them the influence of static pressure, shear and impact stress on proteins.

    6. Effectiveness of Differently Designed Small-Scale Constructed Wetlands to Decrease the Acidity of Acid Mine Drainage under Field Conditions (pages 394–398)

      P. Kuschk, A. Wiessner, S. Buddhawong, U. Stottmeister and M. Kästner

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/elsc.200620143

      The efficiency of constructed wetlands for mine water treatment is difficult to compare because of different site-specific wastewater qualities and the variability of sizing and design. Here, the efficiencies of six different designed constructed wetlands to change the pH and to remove the acidity of acid mine drainage under comparable long-term field conditions are presented.

    7. Biosorption of Heavy Metals from Wastewater by Biosolids (pages 399–402)

      Y. Orhan, J. Hrenovič and H. Büyükgüngör

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/elsc.200520135

      The application of biosorption for the removal of heavy metals from heavy-metal containing plating wastewater was studied. The substances used for heavy metal separation are so-called biosolids consisting of granular activated carbon with immobilized cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and exhibiting important measured effects.

    8. Acclimation Strategy of a Biohydrogen Producing Population in a Continuous-Flow Reactor with Carbohydrate Fermentation (pages 403–409)

      N. Q. Ren and M. L. Gong

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/elsc.200520140

      In order to become a truly environmentally friendly energy source, sustainable or more “green” technologies must be developed to produce hydrogen. These new technologies include biohydrogen production and electrolysis. Basic knowledge on the startup of a practical hydrogen production bioprocess is provided.

    9. Optimization of Xylanase Production by Sporotrichum thermophile Using Corn Cobs and Response Surface Methodology (pages 410–415)

      P. Katapodis, V. Christakopoulou and P. Christakopoulos

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/elsc.200520134

      In recent years, thermostable xylanases have attracted considerable research interest because of their environmentally friendly potential applications in industrial biotechnology, for example in the enzyme aided bleaching of paper. Special attention has been paid to the development of a simple culture medium using cheap and widely available ingredients.

  4. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Overview
    3. Contents
    4. Full Papers
    5. Communication
    1. Decolorizing Reactive Textile Dyes with White-Rot Fungi by Temporary Immersion Cultivation (pages 417–420)

      U. Boehmer, S. H. Suhardi and T. Bley

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/elsc.200520133

      Several reasons account for the attractiveness of enzymes from white rot fungi, especially laccase, in the decontamination of textile dyes. To harness this ability, a simple reactor system incorporating a temporary immersion protocol was used to cultivate the fungi, which were grown on two types of natural substrate.

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