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The EMBO Journal

Cover image for Vol. 33 Issue 12

17 June 2014

Volume 33, Issue 12

Pages 1285–1415

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Have you seen?
    4. Review
    5. Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      STAP dance (pages 1285–1286)

      Bernd Pulverer

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.15252/embj.201489076

      Systematic image screening at EMBO Press uncovers many irregularities, which are thereby prevented from entering the scientific literature. Such mechanisms may have helped thwart publication of manipulated images in recent high-profile papers.

  2. Have you seen?

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Have you seen?
    4. Review
    5. Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      SIRT2 controls the pentose phosphate switch (pages 1287–1288)

      Lindsay E Wu and David A Sinclair

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.15252/embj.201488713

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      G6PD, the rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, is activated by SIRT2 deacetylation to maintain cellular NADPH homeostasis during oxidative stress.

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      NAD+ controls neural stem cell fate in the aging brain (pages 1289–1291)

      Christopher Wiley and Judith Campisi

      Version of Record online: 3 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.15252/embj.201488969

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Age-associated loss of NAD+ or Nampt, the rate-limiting biosynthetic step for this coenzyme, accounts for the loss of neural stem/progenitor cells self-renewal and differentiation.

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      Synapse reorganization—a new partnership revealed (pages 1292–1294)

      Takeo Saneyoshi and Yasunori Hayashi

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embj.201488619

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      New findings reveal that calcium and calmodulin affect the stability of the postsynaptic scaffold by regulating palmitoylation and synaptic membrane localization of PSD-95.

  3. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Have you seen?
    4. Review
    5. Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Immunological memory within the innate immune system (pages 1295–1303)

      Joseph C Sun, Sophie Ugolini and Eric Vivier

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embj.201387651

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      As part of our review series on Molecular Memory, Joseph Sun and colleagues focus on “unconventional” immunological memory, memory responses in natural killer (NK) cells that are traditionally considered part of the innate immune system.

  4. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Have you seen?
    4. Review
    5. Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Regulation of G6PD acetylation by SIRT2 and KAT9 modulates NADPH homeostasis and cell survival during oxidative stress (pages 1304–1320)

      Yi-Ping Wang, Li-Sha Zhou, Yu-Zheng Zhao, Shi-Wen Wang, Lei-Lei Chen, Li-Xia Liu, Zhi-Qiang Ling, Fu-Jun Hu, Yi-Ping Sun, Jing-Ye Zhang, Chen Yang, Yi Yang, Yue Xiong, Kun-Liang Guan and Dan Ye

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embj.201387224

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Following oxidative stress, production of the reductant NADPH via the pentose phosphate pathway is stimulated by SIRT2-mediated deacetylation and activation of G6PD.

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      Specific ablation of Nampt in adult neural stem cells recapitulates their functional defects during aging (pages 1321–1340)

      Liana R Stein and Shin-ichiro Imai

      Version of Record online: 8 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embj.201386917

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      NAD+ and the NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme Nampt decline in the aging hippocampus. Nampt ablation in adult neural stem cells in vivo reduces cell numbers, proliferation, and oligodendrogenesis. Decreases in the stem cell pool are reversed by enhancing hippocampal NAD+.

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      Capping of the N-terminus of PSD-95 by calmodulin triggers its postsynaptic release (pages 1341–1353)

      Yonghong Zhang, Lucas Matt, Tommaso Patriarchi, Zulfiqar A Malik, Dhrubajyoti Chowdhury, Deborah K Park, Alessandra Renieri, James B Ames and Johannes W Hell

      Version of Record online: 4 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embj.201488126

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ca2+ influx promotes Ca2+/calmodulin binding to the N-terminus of PSD-95, which blocks PSD-95 palmitoylation leading to reduced retention of PSD-95 at synapses.

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      Adenosine triphosphate acts as a paracrine signaling molecule to reduce the motility of T cells (pages 1354–1364)

      Chiuhui Mary Wang, Cristina Ploia, Fabio Anselmi, Adelaida Sarukhan and Antonella Viola

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.15252/embj.201386666

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      ATP released by activated T cells induces P2X4/P2X7-mediated calcium waves in neighboring lymphocytes leading to reduced lymphocytes motility that promotes more effective antigen scanning.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Nuclear ARRB1 induces pseudohypoxia and cellular metabolism reprogramming in prostate cancer (pages 1365–1382)

      Vincent Zecchini, Basetti Madhu, Roslin Russell, Nelma Pértega-Gomes, Anne Warren, Edoardo Gaude, Joana Borlido, Rory Stark, Heather Ireland-Zecchini, Roheet Rao, Helen Scott, Joan Boren, Charlie Massie, Mohammad Asim, Kevin Brindle, John Griffiths, Christian Frezza, David E Neal and Ian G Mills

      Version of Record online: 16 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.15252/embj.201386874

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Global chromatin occupancy- and gene expression data, together with ‘pseudohypoxic’ regulation of HIF1alpha stability establish a predominantly metabolic function of nuclear ARRB1 in prostate cancer.

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      Lysophosphatidic acid acts as a nutrient-derived developmental cue to regulate early hematopoiesis (pages 1383–1396)

      Haisen Li, Rui Yue, Bin Wei, Ge Gao, Jiulin Du and Gang Pei

      Version of Record online: 14 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.15252/embj.201387594

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Yolk sac phosphatidylcholines serve not only nutrient roles for the developing embryo, but can also give rise to signaling molecules that are here shown to regulate hemangioblast formation and primitive hematopoiesis in vertebrates.

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      Eaf5/7/3 form a functionally independent NuA4 submodule linked to RNA polymerase II-coupled nucleosome recycling (pages 1397–1415)

      Dorine Rossetto, Myriam Cramet, Alice Y Wang, Anne-Lise Steunou, Nicolas Lacoste, Julia M Schulze, Valérie Côté, Julie Monnet-Saksouk, Sandra Piquet, Amine Nourani, Michael S Kobor and Jacques Côté

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.15252/embj.201386433

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dissection of the essential multisubunit NuA4 acetyltransferase reveals a trimeric subcomplex that interacts with elongating RNA polymerase II and functions independently to control transcription-coupled histone exchange.

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