You have free access to this content

The EMBO Journal

Cover image for Vol. 30 Issue 11

June 1, 2011

Volume 30, Issue 11

Pages 2095–2306

  1. Have you seen?

    1. Top of page
    2. Have you seen?
    3. Article
    4. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Mitochondria breathe for autophagy (pages 2095–2096)

      Koji Okamoto

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.149

      Proper mitochondrial structure and function rely on fusion/fission cycles and on autophagy-mediated mitochondrial degradation. A paper in this issue of The EMBO Journal shows that under amino-acid starvation, autophagy in turn requires healthy mitochondria; thus revealing a crucial mutual interplay between mitochondrial function and autophagy.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Arp you ready for actin in the nucleus? (pages 2097–2098)

      David J Kast and Roberto Dominguez

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.150

      Actin and actin-related proteins (Arps) have crucial yet little understood roles as components of chromatin-remodelling complexes. A study in this issue of The EMBO Journal reports the first structural investigation of two nuclear Arps, the INO80 complex subunits Arp4 and Arp8, and sheds light on the critical role that the nucleotide state of actin may have on its interactions with the Arps.

    3. You have free access to this content
      P53 conformational switching for selectivity may reveal a general solution for specific DNA binding (pages 2099–2100)

      Julie L Tubbs and John A Tainer

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.133

      This article highlights the role of conformational changes in p53 in dictating DNA-binding specificity as described by the Halazonetis laboratory in this issue and extends this principle to other systems such as proteins involved in recognizing specific types of DNA damage.

  2. Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Have you seen?
    3. Article
    4. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Mitochondria regulate autophagy by conserved signalling pathways (pages 2101–2114)

      Martin Graef and Jodi Nunnari

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.104

      Mitochondria are known as autophagy substrates, and implicated in supplying membranes for autophagosome formation. Graef and Nunnari now show them to also directly regulate autophagy gene induction and autophagic flux in yeast.

    2. You have free access to this content
      LMP1 association with CD63 in endosomes and secretion via exosomes limits constitutive NF-κB activation (pages 2115–2129)

      Frederik J Verweij, Monique A J van Eijndhoven, Erik S Hopmans, Tineke Vendrig, Tom Wurdinger, Ellen Cahir-McFarland, Elliott Kieff, Dirk Geerts, Rik van der Kant, Jacques Neefjes, Jaap M Middeldorp and D Michiel Pegtel

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.123

      Epstein Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) plays an important role in viral persistence by promoting constitutive NF-κB signalling. The tetraspanin CD63 directs LMP1 to the endosomal-exosomal system and keeps NF-κB activation in check.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Structural basis for endosomal recruitment of ESCRT-I by ESCRT-0 in yeast (pages 2130–2139)

      Xuefeng Ren and James H Hurley

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.122

      An early step in the biogenesis of multivesicular bodies involves the ESCRT-0-dependent recruitment of ERSCT-I to endosomes. This structural study on the interaction of ESCRT-I and ESCRT-0 in yeast reveals striking differences to the mammalian system in respect to the nature of the binding site and the mode of recognition.

    4. You have free access to this content
      ClC-7 is a slowly voltage-gated 2Cl/1H+-exchanger and requires Ostm1 for transport activity (pages 2140–2152)

      Lilia Leisle, Carmen F Ludwig, Florian A Wagner, Thomas J Jentsch and Tobias Stauber

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.137

      ClC-7/Ostm1 is a disease-relevant lysosomal ion transporter. This study characterizes the functional properties of ClC-7/Ostm1 and disease-relevant mutants for the first time and extends the concept of voltage gating to ion exchangers.

    5. You have free access to this content
      Structural biochemistry of nuclear actin-related proteins 4 and 8 reveals their interaction with actin (pages 2153–2166)

      Sebastian Fenn, Dennis Breitsprecher, Christian B Gerhold, Gregor Witte, Jan Faix and Karl-Peter Hopfner

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.118

      Compared with their cytoplasmic cousins, nuclear actin-related proteins have remained poorly understood. Fenn et al now show two Arp subunits of the INO80 chromatin-remodelling complex to affect actin filament dynamics, and provide structural data to explain these effects.

    6. You have free access to this content
      An induced fit mechanism regulates p53 DNA binding kinetics to confer sequence specificity (pages 2167–2176)

      Tom J Petty, Soheila Emamzadah, Lorenzo Costantino, Irina Petkova, Elena S Stavridi, Jeffery G Saven, Eric Vauthey and Thanos D Halazonetis

      Version of Record online: 26 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.127

      This crystal structure of the p53 DNA binding and homo-tetramerization domains identifies a conformational change involved in an induced fit mechanism of binding to DNA and demonstrates that binding specificity is determined not by affinity but by the dissociation rate of the transcription factor.

    7. You have free access to this content
      USP4 inhibits p53 through deubiquitinating and stabilizing ARF-BP1 (pages 2177–2189)

      Xinna Zhang, Franklin G Berger, Jianhua Yang and Xiongbin Lu

      Version of Record online: 26 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.125

      Another DUB joins the ranks of deubiquitinating enzymes involved in p53 regulation. USP4 acts on the ubiquitin ligase ARF-BP1/Mule/Huwe1, thus decreasing p53 levels and responses; while senescence ensues in USP4-deficient cells.

    8. You have free access to this content
      Eed/Sox2 regulatory loop controls ES cell self-renewal through histone methylation and acetylation (pages 2190–2204)

      Hiroki Ura, Kazuhiro Murakami, Tadayuki Akagi, Keita Kinoshita, Shukuro Yamaguchi, Shinji Masui, Hitoshi Niwa, Hiroshi Koide and Takashi Yokota

      Version of Record online: 3 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.126

      The epigenetic state of chromatin plays an important role in regulating the self-renewal of embryonic stem cells. Here, Sox2 and Eed are shown to form a regulatory loop by which they regulate each other's expression, histone acetylation and methylation to control stem cell pluripotency.

    9. You have free access to this content
      CRM1 controls the composition of nucleoplasmic pre-snoRNA complexes to licence them for nucleolar transport (pages 2205–2218)

      Bérengère Pradet-Balade, Cyrille Girard, Séverine Boulon, Conception Paul, Karim Azzag, Rémy Bordonné, Edouard Bertrand and Céline Verheggen

      Version of Record online: 26 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.128

      The trafficking of snoRNAs during biogenesis is not well understood. Here, the long isoform of the Tgs1 cap hypermethylase binds to and masks the nucleolar localization signal of the snoRNP component Nop58, CRM1 promotes nucleolar transport by removing Tgs1 from the snoRNP.

    10. You have free access to this content
      Aging and chronic DNA damage response activate a regulatory pathway involving miR-29 and p53 (pages 2219–2232)

      Alejandro P Ugalde, Andrew J Ramsay, Jorge de la Rosa, Ignacio Varela, Guillermo Mariño, Juan Cadiñanos, Jun Lu, José MP Freije and Carlos López-Otín

      Version of Record online: 26 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.124

      Previous data from worms implicated miRNAs in lifespan regulation. Analysis of a mammalian progeria model now identifies a miRNA induced upon both premature and physiological aging, contributing to these processes via p53 and DNA damage response pathways.

    11. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Differential control of Eg5-dependent centrosome separation by Plk1 and Cdk1 (pages 2233–2245)

      Ewan Smith, Nadia Hégarat, Clare Vesely, Isaac Roseboom, Chris Larch, Hansjörg Streicher, Kornelis Straatman, Helen Flynn, Mark Skehel, Toru Hirota, Ryoko Kuriyama and Helfrid Hochegger

      Version of Record online: 26 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.120

      Mammalian centrosomes separate prior to mitosis in a process involving Cdk1 and the kinesin Eg5. Dissection by chemical genetics reveals a Cdk1-independent alternative mechanism, in which Plk1 counteracts both centrosomal cohesion factors and Eg5-opposing cytoskeletal forces.

    12. You have free access to this content
      Conjugal plasmid transfer in Streptomyces resembles bacterial chromosome segregation by FtsK/SpoIIIE (pages 2246–2254)

      Jutta Vogelmann, Moritz Ammelburg, Constanze Finger, Jamil Guezguez, Dirk Linke, Matthias Flötenmeyer, York-Dieter Stierhof, Wolfgang Wohlleben and Günther Muth

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.121

      Most bacteria share virulence and resistance genes by transferring single-stranded DNA through a type IV secretion system. Streptomycetes, however, exchange dsDNA, using a system found to closely resemble machineries for prokaryotic chromosome segregation or DNA translocation during spore formation.

    13. You have free access to this content
      Extracellular phosphorylation of the amyloid β-peptide promotes formation of toxic aggregates during the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (pages 2255–2265)

      Sathish Kumar, Nasrollah Rezaei-Ghaleh, Dick Terwel, Dietmar R Thal, Mélisande Richard, Michael Hoch, Jessica M Mc Donald, Ullrich Wüllner, Konstantin Glebov, Michael T Heneka, Dominic M Walsh, Markus Zweckstetter and Jochen Walter

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.138

      Phosphorylation of Alzheimer-associated Aβ peptide increases its aggregation and toxicity.

    14. You have free access to this content
      APP and APLP2 are essential at PNS and CNS synapses for transmission, spatial learning and LTP (pages 2266–2280)

      Sascha W Weyer, Maja Klevanski, Andrea Delekate, Vootele Voikar, Dorothee Aydin, Meike Hick, Mikhail Filippov, Natalia Drost, Kristin L Schaller, Martina Saar, Miriam A Vogt, Peter Gass, Ayan Samanta, Andres Jäschke, Martin Korte, David P Wolfer, John H Caldwell and Ulrike C Müller

      Version of Record online: 26 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.119

      The in vivo function of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its related homologue APLP2 in the adult nervous system is not resolved. Here, the findings show that APLP2 and APP are required to mediate neuromuscular transmission, spatial learning, and synaptic plasticity.

    15. You have free access to this content
      MT1-MMP cleaves Dll1 to negatively regulate Notch signalling to maintain normal B-cell development (pages 2281–2293)

      Guoxiang Jin, Fengju Zhang, Kui Ming Chan, Hoi Leong Xavier Wong, Baohua Liu, Kathryn S E Cheah, Xinguang Liu, Cornelia Mauch, Depei Liu and Zhongjun Zhou

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.136

      The membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase MT1-MMP cleaves and inactivates the Notch ligand Delta-like 1 in bone marrow stromal cells and thereby suppresses Notch signalling in neighbouring haematopoietic progenitor cells.

    16. You have free access to this content
      Galactose-modified iNKT cell agonists stabilized by an induced fit of CD1d prevent tumour metastasis (pages 2294–2305)

      Sandrine Aspeslagh, Yali Li, Esther Dawen Yu, Nora Pauwels, Matthias Trappeniers, Enrico Girardi, Tine Decruy, Katrien Van Beneden, Koen Venken, Michael Drennan, Luc Leybaert, Jing Wang, Richard W Franck, Serge Van Calenbergh, Dirk M Zajonc and Dirk Elewaut

      Version of Record online: 6 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.145

      Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are activated by lipid derivatives presented by the non-classical MHC I molecule CD1d. Galactose-modified glycolipids enhance the affinity of glycolipids for CD1d, leading to sustained iNKT cell responses and tumour protection in vivo.

  3. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Have you seen?
    3. Article
    4. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      APP and APLP2 are essential at PNS and CNS synapses for transmission, spatial learning and LTP (page 2306)

      Sascha W Weyer, Maja Klevanski, Andrea Delekate, Vootele Voikar, Dorothee Aydin, Meike Hick, Mikhail Filippov, Natalia Drost, Kristin L Schaller, Martina Saar, Miriam A Vogt, Peter Gass, Ayan Samanta, Andres Jäschke, Martin Korte, David P Wolfer, John H Caldwell and Ulrike C Müller

      Version of Record online: 17 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.164

      This article corrects:

      APP and APLP2 are essential at PNS and CNS synapses for transmission, spatial learning and LTP

      Vol. 30, Issue 11, 2266–2280, Version of Record online: 26 APR 2011

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION