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The EMBO Journal

Cover image for Vol. 30 Issue 20

October 19, 2011

Volume 30, Issue 20

Pages 4113–4335

  1. Have you seen?

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    3. Review
    4. Article
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      Duelling functions of the V-ATPase (pages 4113–4115)

      Cameron C Scott, Christin Bissig and Jean Gruenberg

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.355

      The V-ATPase cellular proton pump has been implicated in membrane fusion, although its role here remains poorly understood. New evidence sheds light on the functional interaction between the V0 domain of the pump and the core membrane fusion machinery.

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      Releasing a tiny molecular brake may improve memory (pages 4116–4118)

      Roberto Fiore and Gerhard Schratt

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.356

      MicroRNAs are regulators of transcriptome plasticity and have been linked to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Here, the role of miR-34c in the cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's disease and ageing is discussed.

  2. Review

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    3. Review
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      After half a century mitochondrial calcium in- and efflux machineries reveal themselves (pages 4119–4125)

      Ilaria Drago, Paola Pizzo and Tullio Pozzan

      Version of Record online: 20 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.337

      Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and release play a fundamental role in the cell, but the molecular identities of the channels and transporters involved have remained mysterious. This article reviews recent work that finally unravelled the mitochondrial calcium in- and efflux machineries.

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    3. Review
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      The V-ATPase proteolipid cylinder promotes the lipid-mixing stage of SNARE-dependent fusion of yeast vacuoles (pages 4126–4141)

      Bernd Strasser, Justyna Iwaszkiewicz, Olivier Michielin and Andreas Mayer

      Version of Record online: 20 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.335

      The V-ATPase pumps protons from the cytosol into the vacuole. In addition, its membrane-embedded sector V0 has been implicated in driving membrane fusion events. This study demonstrates a direct role of V0 in the lipid-mixing step of vacuolar fusion.

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      Class IIb HDAC6 regulates endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis by deacetylation of cortactin (pages 4142–4156)

      David Kaluza, Jens Kroll, Sabine Gesierich, Tso-Pang Yao, Reinier A Boon, Eduard Hergenreider, Marc Tjwa, Lothar Rössig, Edward Seto, Hellmut G Augustin, Andreas M Zeiher, Stefanie Dimmeler and Carmen Urbich

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.298

      The histone deacetylase HDAC6 is essential for endothelial cell sprouting and migration, and hence the formation of functional vascular networks in zebrafish and mouse. HDAC6 regulates angiogenesis through deacetylation of the actin-remodelling protein cortactin.

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      Stabilizing the VE-cadherin–catenin complex blocks leukocyte extravasation and vascular permeability (pages 4157–4170)

      Dörte Schulte, Verena Küppers, Nina Dartsch, Andre Broermann, Hang Li, Alexander Zarbock, Olena Kamenyeva, Friedemann Kiefer, Alexander Khandoga, Steffen Massberg and Dietmar Vestweber

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.304

      Leukocyte exit from the bloodstream involves crossing the endothelial barrier. Both trans- and paracellular routes have been proposed for transmigration. Preventing opening of intercellular junctions blocks extravasation - providing strong evidence for the importance of the paracellular route.

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      A thermodynamic switch modulates abscisic acid receptor sensitivity (pages 4171–4184)

      Florine Dupeux, Julia Santiago, Katja Betz, Jamie Twycross, Sang-Youl Park, Lesia Rodriguez, Miguel Gonzalez-Guzman, Malene Ringkjøbing Jensen, Natalio Krasnogor, Martin Blackledge, Michael Holdsworth, Sean R Cutler, Pedro L Rodriguez and José Antonio Márquez

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.294

      Structural and biochemical data suggest that the PYR/PYL family of abscisic acid (ABA) receptors can be classified according to their monomeric or dimeric status, having differential affinities for ABA. The properties of these two types of receptor might lead to distinct signalling responses in plants.

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      Structural analysis of the Ras-like G protein MglA and its cognate GAP MglB and implications for bacterial polarity (pages 4185–4197)

      Mandy Miertzschke, Carolin Koerner, Ingrid R Vetter, Daniela Keilberg, Edina Hot, Simone Leonardy, Lotte Søgaard-Andersen and Alfred Wittinghofer

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.291

      The small G protein MglA and its cognate GAP MglB exemplify a new type of GTPase activation mechanism. In contrast to other Ras-like proteins, the key ‘arginine finger’ is provided not by the GAP, but by MglA itself.

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      H3K4 tri-methylation provides an epigenetic signature of active enhancers (pages 4198–4210)

      Aleksandra Pekowska, Touati Benoukraf, Joaquin Zacarias-Cabeza, Mohamed Belhocine, Frederic Koch, Hélène Holota, Jean Imbert, Jean-Christophe Andrau, Pierre Ferrier and Salvatore Spicuglia

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.295

      Global analysis of histon H3 methylation during T-lymphocyte development identifies an increase in H3K4me2 or H3K4me3 at enhancer elements that are associated with genomic loci activated upon differentiation.

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      Pin1 and WWP2 regulate GluR2 Q/R site RNA editing by ADAR2 with opposing effects (pages 4211–4222)

      Roberto Marcucci, James Brindle, Simona Paro, Angela Casadio, Sophie Hempel, Nicholas Morrice, Andrea Bisso, Liam P Keegan, Giannino Del Sal and Mary A O'Connell

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.303

      While the essential role of the adenosine deaminase ADAR2 in RNA editing is well established, how it is regulated remains largely unknown. Here, the prolyl isomerase Pin1 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase WWP2 are shown to play a role in regulating ADAR2 localisation and stability.

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      An extended dsRBD with a novel zinc-binding motif mediates nuclear retention of fission yeast Dicer (pages 4223–4235)

      Pierre Barraud, Stephan Emmerth, Yukiko Shimada, Hans-Rudolf Hotz, Frédéric H-T Allain and Marc Bühler

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.300

      The Dicer ribonuclease Dcr1 plays an important role in the biogenesis of small regulatory RNAs. Surprisingly, RNA binding by the double-stranded RNA binding domain (dsRBD) is dispensable for Dcr1 function, while zinc coordination of the extended dsRBD is required for its nuclear localization and RNA silencing.

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      Structure of the SSB–DNA polymerase III interface and its role in DNA replication (pages 4236–4247)

      Aimee H Marceau, Soon Bahng, Shawn C Massoni, Nicholas P George, Steven J Sandler, Kenneth J Marians and James L Keck

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.305

      Structure-based analyses show the significance of replicative DNA polymerase binding to single-strand binding proteins. In E. coli, this interaction appears dispensable for Okazaki fragment synthesis but important for stabilizing the replisome.

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      LPA-producing enzyme PA-PLA1α regulates hair follicle development by modulating EGFR signalling (pages 4248–4260)

      Asuka Inoue, Naoaki Arima, Jun Ishiguro, Glenn D Prestwich, Hiroyuki Arai and Junken Aoki

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.296

      Lysophosphatidic acid, LPA, via its receptor P2Y5, regulates the differentiation and maturation of hair follicles by promoting TACE-dependent shedding of membrane-bound TGFα and EGFR transactivation.

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      iASPP/p63 autoregulatory feedback loop is required for the homeostasis of stratified epithelia (pages 4261–4273)

      Anissa Chikh, Rubeta N H Matin, Valentina Senatore, Martin Hufbauer, Danielle Lavery, Claudio Raimondi, Paola Ostano, Maurizia Mello-Grand, Chiara Ghimenti, Adiam Bahta, Sahira Khalaf, Baki Akgül, Kristin M Braun, Giovanna Chiorino, Michael P Philpott, Catherine A Harwood and Daniele Bergamaschi

      Version of Record online: 6 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.302

      This manuscript identifies an essential role for the p53 inhibitor iASPP in keratinocyte biology. By regulating two new microRNAs, iASPP controls p63, a key transcriptional regulator for the formation of stratified epithelia.

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      PIKE-mediated PI3-kinase activity is required for AMPA receptor surface expression (pages 4274–4286)

      Chi Bun Chan, Yongjun Chen, Xia Liu, Xiaoling Tang, Chi Wai Lee, Lin Mei and Keqiang Ye

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.281

      Trafficking of AMPA receptor to the synaptic membrane is a dynamic process and important for synaptic plasticity. PIKE-L, a GTPase that interacts with and enhances the activity of PI3K, is shown here to regulate AMPA receptor trafficking during LTP.

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      CBP is required for environmental enrichment-induced neurogenesis and cognitive enhancement (pages 4287–4298)

      Jose P Lopez-Atalaya, Alessandro Ciccarelli, Jose Viosca, Luis M Valor, Maria Jimenez-Minchan, Santiago Canals, Maurizio Giustetto and Angel Barco

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.299

      An enriched environment (EE) promotes neurogenesis and improves learning and memory in rodents. Here, the findings show that the histone acetyltransferase CBP is needed for EE-dependent enhancement of cognitive function and adult neurogenesis.

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      microRNA-34c is a novel target to treat dementias (pages 4299–4308)

      Athanasios Zovoilis, Hope Y Agbemenyah, Roberto C Agis-Balboa, Roman M Stilling, Dieter Edbauer, Pooja Rao, Laurent Farinelli, Ivana Delalle, Andrea Schmitt, Peter Falkai, Sanaz Bahari-Javan, Susanne Burkhardt, Farahnaz Sananbenesi and Andre Fischer

      Version of Record online: 23 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.327

      The miRNAome of the mouse hippocampus reveals miR-34c as a specific negative regulator of memory formation. miR-34c levels are elevated in a mouse model of Alzheimer's Disease as well as in Alzheimer's patients, and miR-34c inhibition restores memory performance in the animal model.

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      CAMTA1 is a novel tumour suppressor regulated by miR-9/9* in glioblastoma stem cells (pages 4309–4322)

      Daniel Schraivogel, Lasse Weinmann, Dagmar Beier, Ghazaleh Tabatabai, Alexander Eichner, Jia Yun Zhu, Martina Anton, Michael Sixt, Michael Weller, Christoph P Beier and Gunter Meister

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.301

      This work identifies the calmodulin-binding transcription activator CAMTA1 as a crucial miRNA-9/9* target in glioblastoma, and provides evidence that CAMTA1 is a therapeutically relevant tumour suppressor.

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      C/EBPβ mediates tumour-induced ubiquitin ligase atrogin1/MAFbx upregulation and muscle wasting (pages 4323–4335)

      Guohua Zhang, Bingwen Jin and Yi-Ping Li

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.292

      Cancer is often accompanied by muscle atrophy—a syndrome known as cachexia. Here, the underlying molecular pathway is investigated: tumour cells activate p38 MAPK and C/EBPbeta, leading to upregulation of the ubiquitin ligase atrogin that promotes muscle wasting.

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