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The EMBO Journal

Cover image for Vol. 30 Issue 3

February 2, 2011

Volume 30, Issue 3

Pages 451–628

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      Fis1, Bap31 and the kiss of death between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (pages 451–452)

      Bing Wang, Mai Nguyen, Natasha C Chang and Gordon C Shore

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2010.352

      A study in this issue of The EMBO Journal sheds light on how mitochondria–ER dynamics, which affect various cell functions, regulate Bax/Bak-driven apoptosis within the complex milieu of the cell. In cell death, these organelles engage in an unanticipated two-way communication, from mitochondria to ER and back again.

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      A spicy family tree: TRPV1 and its thermoceptive and nociceptive lineage (pages 453–455)

      David D McKemy

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2010.350

      In the current issue, Mishra and colleagues demonstrate that mice lacking somatosensory neurons in the TRPV1 lineage are completely insensitive to thermal stimuli, including both hot and cold temperatures.

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    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Molecular mechanism of Ena/VASP-mediated actin-filament elongation (pages 456–467)

      Dennis Breitsprecher, Antje K Kiesewetter, Joern Linkner, Marlene Vinzenz, Theresia E B Stradal, John Victor Small, Ute Curth, Richard B Dickinson and Jan Faix

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2010.348

      Ena/VASP proteins have important functions in actin-dependent processes. A model for the actin elongation activity of Ena/VASP based on the affinity and saturation state of WH2-domain-mediated actin monomer binding is presented.

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      The phosphorylation of the androgen receptor by TFIIH directs the ubiquitin/proteasome process (pages 468–479)

      Pierre Chymkowitch, Nicolas Le May, Pierre Charneau, Emmanuel Compe and Jean-Marc Egly

      Version of Record online: 14 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2010.337

      The TFIIH-associated kinase Cdk7 is found to switch androgen receptor fate and function: AR phosphorylation promotes recruitment of the ubiquitin ligase Mdm2 and cyclic transcription, while lack of AR phosphorylation recruits another ubiquitin ligase, CHIP, into the transactivation complex.

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      Asf1b, the necessary Asf1 isoform for proliferation, is predictive of outcome in breast cancer (pages 480–493)

      Armelle Corpet, Leanne De Koning, Joern Toedling, Alexia Savignoni, Frédérique Berger, Charlène Lemaître, Roderick J O'Sullivan, Jan Karlseder, Emmanuel Barillot, Bernard Asselain, Xavier Sastre-Garau and Geneviève Almouzni

      Version of Record online: 21 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2010.335

      Anti-silencing function 1 (Asf1) is a H3–H4 chaperone involved in both replication-coupled and replication-independent nucleosome assembly pathways. Here in mammalian cells Asf1b is the physiologically important isoform for cell proliferation and overexpression of Asf1b correlates with prognosis and metastasis status of breast cancer.

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      Differential genomic targeting of the transcription factor TAL1 in alternate haematopoietic lineages (pages 494–509)

      Carmen G Palii, Carolina Perez-Iratxeta, Zizhen Yao, Yi Cao, Fengtao Dai, Jerry Davison, Harold Atkins, David Allan, F Jeffrey Dilworth, Robert Gentleman, Stephen J Tapscott and Marjorie Brand

      Version of Record online: 21 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2010.342

      Expression of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor TAL1/SCL is required for erythrocyte differentiation; aberrant expression in lymphoid cells leads to oncogenic transformation. Here, global analysis of TAL1 binding in erythroid and malignant T cells identifies cell type specific functional interaction with the transcription factors RUNX and ETS1.

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      Acetylation and phosphorylation of SRSF2 control cell fate decision in response to cisplatin (pages 510–523)

      Valerie Edmond, Elodie Moysan, Saadi Khochbin, Patrick Matthias, Christian Brambilla, Elisabeth Brambilla, Sylvie Gazzeri and Beatrice Eymin

      Version of Record online: 14 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2010.333

      SR family proteins regulate alternative splicing. In this study, the Tip60 acetyltransferase regulates splicing by directly acetylating the splicing factor SRSF2, leading to its proteasomal degradation, and indirectly by relocalising the SRPK1/2 kinase, thereby reducing the phosphorylation levels of SRSF2.

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      miR-605 joins p53 network to form a p53:miR-605:Mdm2 positive feedback loop in response to stress (pages 524–532)

      Jiening Xiao, Huixian Lin, Xiaobin Luo, Xiaoyan Luo and Zhiguo Wang

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2010.347

      Mdm2, a transcriptional target of p53, promotes p53 degradation in a well-established negative feedback loop. Here, microRNA miR-605 is found to break this loop: being induced by p53 in response to stress, and downregulating Mdm2 to promote robust p53 expression.

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      A quantitative RNA code for mRNA target selection by the germline fate determinant GLD-1 (pages 533–545)

      Jane E Wright, Dimos Gaidatzis, Mathias Senften, Brian M Farley, Eric Westhof, Sean P Ryder and Rafal Ciosk

      Version of Record online: 17 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2010.334

      The Caenorhabditis elegans RNA-binding protein GLD-1 is a critical regulator of germline fate. Here, a quantitative approach to identifying GLD-1 target RNAs provides insight into the post-transcriptional regulatory networks underlying germ cell development.

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      ATM activates the pentose phosphate pathway promoting anti-oxidant defence and DNA repair (pages 546–555)

      Claudia Cosentino, Domenico Grieco and Vincenzo Costanzo

      Version of Record online: 14 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2010.330

      The DNA damage-induced ATM kinase is linked to the metabolic pentose phosphate pathway, thus boosting biosynthesis of nucleotide precursors required for DNA repair and stimulating generation of the anti-oxidant NADPH, which may explain neurological defects of ataxia telangiectasia patients lacking ATM function.

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      Fis1 and Bap31 bridge the mitochondria–ER interface to establish a platform for apoptosis induction (pages 556–568)

      Ryota Iwasawa, Anne-Laure Mahul-Mellier, Christoph Datler, Evangelos Pazarentzos and Stefan Grimm

      Version of Record online: 24 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2010.346

      The Fis1–Bap31 complex (ARCosome) recruits and activates the initiator procaspase-8 at the interface between the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum.

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      Concerted action of zinc and ProSAP/Shank in synaptogenesis and synapse maturation (pages 569–581)

      Andreas M Grabrucker, Mary J Knight, Christian Proepper, Juergen Bockmann, Marisa Joubert, Magali Rowan, G UIrich Nienhaus, Craig C Garner, Jim U Bowie, Michael R Kreutz, Eckart D Gundelfinger and Tobias M Boeckers

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2010.336

      ProSAP/Shank are scaffolding proteins that localize to the postsynaptic density (PSD). This study shows that Zn2+ ions directly regulate the localization and recruitment of Shank/ProSAP1/2 to PSDs to facilitate synapse formation and maturation.

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      TRPV1-lineage neurons are required for thermal sensation (pages 582–593)

      Santosh K Mishra, Sarah M Tisel, Peihan Orestes, Sonia K Bhangoo and Mark A Hoon

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2010.325

      The TRPV1 ion channel is expressed in sensory neurons and is involved in sensing noxious heat. By using a molecular genetic approach to generate mice that lack TRPV1-expressing neurons, the findings show that the TrpV1-lineage neurons are needed for sensing hot and cold temperatures, but not for normal touch and mechanical pain sensation.

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      Dephosphorylation of Carma1 by PP2A negatively regulates T-cell activation (pages 594–605)

      Andrea C Eitelhuber, Sebastian Warth, Gisela Schimmack, Michael Düwel, Kamyar Hadian, Katrin Demski, Wolfgang Beisker, Hisaaki Shinohara, Tomohiro Kurosaki, Vigo Heissmeyer and Daniel Krappmann

      Version of Record online: 14 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2010.331

      Carma1 is phosphorylated upon TCR stimulation and this triggers NF-κB activation. Here, PP2A is shown to be a negative regulator of NF-κB signalling in T cells by dephosphorylating Carma1.

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      Substrate recognition by complement convertases revealed in the C5–cobra venom factor complex (pages 606–616)

      Nick S Laursen, Kasper R Andersen, Ingke Braren, Edzard Spillner, Lars Sottrup-Jensen and Gregers R Andersen

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2010.341

      Activation of the complement system by proteolytic cleavage leads to an inflammatory response. The complement components C3 and C5 are cleaved by convertases. Here, the crystal structure of C5 in complex with cobra venom factor provides structural insight into how complement convertases recognize their substrates.

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      Large ring polymers align FtsZ polymers for normal septum formation (pages 617–626)

      Muhammet E Gündoğdu, Yoshikazu Kawai, Nada Pavlendova, Naotake Ogasawara, Jeff Errington, Dirk-Jan Scheffers and Leendert W Hamoen

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2010.345

      The bacterial cell division protein FtsZ assembles into a circular structure at the site of cell division. SepF is important for cell division, but how it functions is not clear. Here, the findings show that SepF polymerizes into large rings that promote the assembly of FtsZ during septum formation.

  3. Corrigendum

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    3. Article
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      Identification of a novel receptor/signal transduction pathway for IL-15/T in mast cells (page 627)

      Yutaka Tagaya, Jack D Burton, Yoshihisa Miyamoto and Thomas A Waldmann

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.6

  4. Retraction

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      A promiscuous liaison between IL-15 receptor and Axl receptor tyrosine kinase in cell death control (page 627)

      Vadim Budagian, Elena Bulanova, Zane Orinska, Lutz Thon, Uwe Mamat, Paola Bellosta, Claudio Basilico, Dieter Adam, Ralf Paus and Silvia Bulfone-Paus

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.7

      This article corrects:

      A promiscuous liaison between IL-15 receptor and Axl receptor tyrosine kinase in cell death control

      Vol. 24, Issue 24, 4260–4270, Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2005

  5. Corrigendum

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      More than one way to make a tail (page 628)

      William F Marzluff

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2010.354

      This article corrects:

      More than one way to make a tail

      Vol. 29, Issue 24, 4066–4067, Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2010

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