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The EMBO Journal

Cover image for Vol. 30 Issue 6

March 16, 2011

Volume 30, Issue 6

Pages 983–1183

  1. Have you seen?

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    2. Have you seen?
    3. Article
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      The erythroid/myeloid lineage fate paradigm takes a new player (pages 983–985)

      Jian Xu and Stuart H Orkin

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.45

      This issue of The EMBO Journal features a new paradigm for cell lineage commitment. By studying early haematopoiesis in zebrafish, Roger Patient and colleagues characterize the Tif1 gamma-ligase as a context-specific regulator of Gata1/PU1-driven fate decisions.

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      TRAPping telomerase within the intestinal stem cell niche (pages 986–987)

      Matthew F Pech and Steven E Artandi

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.51

      Recent work from Hans Clevers' lab reveals high telomerase activity and telomere length in dividing LGR5-positive intestinal stem cells. They further report random chromosome segregation and thus challenge the ‘immortal strand’ hypothesis at least for this stem cell population.

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      Negative regulation of immune responses on the fly (pages 988–990)

      Kwang-Zin Lee and Dominique Ferrandon

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.47

      The Toll and the IMD pathways are key regulators of innate immunity in Drosophila. A paper in this issue of the EMBO Journal reports that activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway negatively regulates the IMD pathway and limits the magnitude of the innate immune response during an infection.

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      Genomic instability in iPS: time for a break (pages 991–993)

      Maria A Blasco, Manuel Serrano and Oscar Fernandez-Capetillo

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.50

      This ‘Have you seen?’ features important insights into genomic aberrations of pluripotent stem cells from studies recently published in Nature, Cell Stem Cell and Cell Death & Differentiation. These findings highlight necessary caution before translating this technology into actual therapies.

  2. Article

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    2. Have you seen?
    3. Article
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      The biophysical and molecular basis of TRPV1 proton gating (pages 994–1002)

      Eduardo Aneiros, Lishuang Cao, Marianthi Papakosta, Edward B Stevens, Stephen Phillips and Christian Grimm

      Version of Record online: 1 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.19

      TRPV1 channels are opened by noxious thermal stimuli, protons, and the alkaloid capsaicin. Protons shift the voltage dependence of gating via a mechanism that involves a key residue within the pore region.

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      TIM23-mediated insertion of transmembrane α-helices into the mitochondrial inner membrane (pages 1003–1011)

      Salomé Calado Botelho, Marie Österberg, Andreas S Reichert, Koji Yamano, Patrik Björkholm, Toshiya Endo, Gunnar von Heijne and Hyun Kim

      Version of Record online: 15 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.29

      This comprehensive analysis of the sequence determinants for TIM23-mediated insertion of mitochondrial inner membrane proteins reveals strikingly different requirements for protein insertion into the mitochondrial inner membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum.

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      Dynamics of Sir3 spreading in budding yeast: secondary recruitment sites and euchromatic localization (pages 1012–1026)

      Marta Radman-Livaja, Giulia Ruben, Assaf Weiner, Nir Friedman, Rohinton Kamakaka and Oliver J Rando

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.30

      This paper reports the genome-wide binding pattern and temporal spreading of the key SIR complex component Sir3. These results lend further support to the notion that heterochromatin complexes associate with highly expressed euchromatic genes in many organisms and reveal that nucleation/linear polymerization is not sufficient to explain heterochromatin complex localization.

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      Red1 promotes the elimination of meiosis-specific mRNAs in vegetatively growing fission yeast (pages 1027–1039)

      Tomoyasu Sugiyama and Rie Sugioka-Sugiyama

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.32

      In mitotic fission yeast cells, expression of meiosis-specific mRNAs is prevented by their selective degradation in nuclear bodies. A novel required factor, Red1, leaves these nuclear bodies during meiosis, offering first hints on the regulation of this process.

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      Global dissociation of HuR–mRNA complexes promotes cell survival after ionizing radiation (pages 1040–1053)

      Kiyoshi Masuda, Kotb Abdelmohsen, Mihee M Kim, Subramanya Srikantan, Eun Kyung Lee, Kumiko Tominaga, Roza Selimyan, Jennifer L Martindale, Xiaoling Yang, Elin Lehrmann, Yongqing Zhang, Kevin G Becker, Jian-Ying Wang, Hyeon Ho Kim and Myriam Gorospe

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.24

      The RNA-binding protein HuR is phosphorylated by the checkpoint kinase Chk2. Here, Chk2-mediated HuR phosphorylation upon ionizing radiation induces global dissociation of HuR from its target RNAs. This regulation of HuR activity is important for cell survival after IR.

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      RNA content in the nucleolus alters p53 acetylation via MYBBP1A (pages 1054–1066)

      Takao Kuroda, Akiko Murayama, Naohiro Katagiri, Yu-mi Ohta, Etsuko Fujita, Hiroshi Masumoto, Masatsugu Ema, Satoru Takahashi, Keiji Kimura and Junn Yanagisawa

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.23

      A major integrator in the post-translational regulation of the tumour suppressor p53 is the nucleolus. The relay from nucleolar stress to p53 activation is now shown to involve a protein that shuttles out of the nucleolus upon decreased rRNA generation, to aid p53 acetylation in the nucleoplasm.

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      The SUMO system controls nucleolar partitioning of a novel mammalian ribosome biogenesis complex (pages 1067–1078)

      Elisabeth Finkbeiner, Markus Haindl and Stefan Muller

      Version of Record online: 15 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.33

      A search for SUMO-modified targets that may explain the roles of desumoylating proteases in ribosome biogenesis has identified a mammalian protein complex, whose SUMO-controlled subnuclear relocalization is involved in the maturation and export of pre-ribosomes.

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      Factors determining DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice in G2 phase (pages 1079–1092)

      Atsushi Shibata, Sandro Conrad, Julie Birraux, Verena Geuting, Olivia Barton, Amani Ismail, Andreas Kakarougkas, Katheryn Meek, Gisela Taucher-Scholz, Markus Löbrich and Penny A Jeggo

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.27

      Double-strand breaks in replicated genomes are repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ gets the first attempt, while HR takes over after its failure at more complex lesions or chromatin environments. These results imply repair speed as a decisive factor in pathway choice.

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      The gata1/pu.1 lineage fate paradigm varies between blood populations and is modulated by tif1γ (pages 1093–1103)

      Rui Monteiro, Claire Pouget and Roger Patient

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.34

      This study provides novel insight into erythroid-myeloid fate decision during early hematopoiesis in zebrafish. It establishes a new paradigm by adding Tif1γ to the regulatory interactions of Gata1 and PU1 in a niche-dependent manner.

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      Lgr5 intestinal stem cells have high telomerase activity and randomly segregate their chromosomes (pages 1104–1109)

      Arnout G Schepers, Robert Vries, Maaike van den Born, Marc van de Wetering and Hans Clevers

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.26

      This report reveals high telomerase activity and telomere length in dividing Lgr5-positive intestinal stem cells, features that decline during differentiation of stem cell progeny. Random segregation of chromosomes is observed, which is inconsistent with the “immortal strand” hypothesis.

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      Food sensitizes C. elegans avoidance behaviours through acute dopamine signalling (pages 1110–1122)

      Marina Ezcurra, Yoshinori Tanizawa, Peter Swoboda and William R Schafer

      Version of Record online: 8 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.22

      The findings show that the behavioural response of Caenorhabditis elegans to soluble repellents is modulated by food availability and that this is mediated via dopamine signalling.

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      Drosophila Ras/MAPK signalling regulates innate immune responses in immune and intestinal stem cells (pages 1123–1136)

      Anan Ragab, Tina Buechling, Viola Gesellchen, Kerstin Spirohn, Anna-Lisa Boettcher and Michael Boutros

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.4

      Using a genome-wide RNAi screen to identify modulators of the innate immune response in Drosophila, the findings show that the Ras/MAPK signalling is important for suppressing immune signalling in the absence of an immune challenge and that it sets the threshold for pathway activity during an infection.

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      Structure of a TCR with high affinity for self-antigen reveals basis for escape from negative selection (pages 1137–1148)

      Yiyuan Yin, Yili Li, Melissa C Kerzic, Roland Martin and Roy A Mariuzza

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.21

      This structural study shows how T-cell receptors engage self-peptides that trigger autoimmune reactions, providing insight into how T cells bearing such TCRs can escape negative selection.

    14. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      CESTA, a positive regulator of brassinosteroid biosynthesis (pages 1149–1161)

      Brigitte Poppenberger, Wilfried Rozhon, Mamoona Khan, Sigrid Husar, Gerhard Adam, Christian Luschnig, Shozo Fujioka and Tobias Sieberer

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.35

      Brassinosteroids are important plant hormones involved in the regulation of cell elongation, division, differentiation and development. This study identifies CESTA as a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that positively regulates brassinosteroid homeostasis.

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      The conserved factor DE-ETIOLATED 1 cooperates with CUL4–DDB1DDB2 to maintain genome integrity upon UV stress (pages 1162–1172)

      Enric Castells, Jean Molinier, Giovanna Benvenuto, Clara Bourbousse, Gerald Zabulon, Antoine Zalc, Stefano Cazzaniga, Pascal Genschik, Fredy Barneche and Chris Bowler

      Version of Record online: 8 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.20

      In plants, the conserved ubiquitin ligase component DET1 is implicated in photomorphogenesis. Independent from this, DET1 is also found to directly function in UV protection in Arabidopsis, teaming up with a key nucleotide excision repair ubiquitin ligase.

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      The Arabidopsis peptide kiss of death is an inducer of programmed cell death (pages 1173–1183)

      Robert Blanvillain, Bennett Young, Yao-min Cai, Valérie Hecht, Fabrice Varoquaux, Valérie Delorme, Jean-Marc Lancelin, Michel Delseny and Patrick Gallois

      Version of Record online: 15 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.14

      This study identifies a novel regulator of cell death in plants and shows that the 25-amino-acid peptide kiss of death regulates programmed cell death at an early step in the cell death-signalling cascade.

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