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The EMBO Journal

Cover image for Vol. 30 Issue 8

April 20, 2011

Volume 30, Issue 8

Pages 1415–1671

  1. Have you seen?

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    2. Have you seen?
    3. Article
    4. Corrigendum
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      Wnt signalling: What The X@# is WTX? (pages 1415–1417)

      Yannik Regimbald-Dumas and Xi He

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.101

      In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Tanneberger et al demonstrate that Amer1/WTX, a tumour suppressor protein previously known for promoting β-catenin degradation and thus antagonizing Wnt signalling, is also required for LRP6 receptor phosphorylation and therefore activation of Wnt signalling.

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      Adipogenic hotspots: where the action is (pages 1418–1419)

      David J Steger and Mitchell A Lazar

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.80

      This article highlights the role of global chromatin remodelling events and transcription factor hotspots during adipocyte differentiation as described in this issue by the Mandrup and Hagar laboratories.

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      Suppression of cryptic intragenic transcripts is required for embryonic stem cell self-renewal (pages 1420–1421)

      Chia-Hui Lin and Jerry L Workman

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.99

      This article highlights work from the Impey laboratory that describes a novel role for histone demethylases in regulating the expression of cryptic transcripts and self-renewal genes in embryonic stem cells.

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      D-Eph-ective endocytosis disrupts topographic mapping (pages 1422–1424)

      Uwe Drescher

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.87

      A paper in this issue of The EMBO Journal shows the importance of Eph/ephrin endocytosis for axon guidance and topographic mapping.

  2. Article

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    3. Article
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    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Identification of FtsW as a transporter of lipid-linked cell wall precursors across the membrane (pages 1425–1432)

      Tamimount Mohammadi, Vincent van Dam, Robert Sijbrandi, Thierry Vernet, André Zapun, Ahmed Bouhss, Marlies Diepeveen-de Bruin, Martine Nguyen-Distèche, Ben de Kruijff and Eefjan Breukink

      Article first published online: 8 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.61

      This study identifies FtsW as the flippase that translocates lipid-linked peptidoglycan precursors across the cell membrane during bacterial cell wall synthesis.

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      Amer1/WTX couples Wnt-induced formation of PtdIns(4,5)P2 to LRP6 phosphorylation (pages 1433–1443)

      Kristina Tanneberger, Astrid S Pfister, Katharina Brauburger, Jean Schneikert, Michel V Hadjihannas, Vitezslav Kriz, Gunnar Schulte, Vitezslav Bryja and Jürgen Behrens

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.28

      Amer1/WTX has previously been shown to promote β-catenin degradation. Here, the authors uncover an unexpected role of Amer1/WTX as a positive regulator of Wnt signalling. Amer/WTX acts as a scaffold protein that is recruited to the plasma membrane in response to Wnt stimulation and is needed for the phosphorylation and activation of the LRP6 receptor.

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      Jerky/Earthbound facilitates cell-specific Wnt/Wingless signalling by modulating β-catenin–TCF activity (pages 1444–1458)

      Hassina Benchabane, Nan Xin, Ai Tian, Brian P Hafler, Kerrie Nguyen, Ayah Ahmed and Yashi Ahmed

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.67

      Cell type-specific interpretation of Wnt/β-catenin signals is a major unanswered question in developmental biology. This paper characterizes Ebd/Jerky, a member of the family of DNA-binding CENPB domain proteins as new tissue-specific and positive regulator of this developmental and tumour-relevant pathway.

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      Extensive chromatin remodelling and establishment of transcription factor ‘hotspots’ during early adipogenesis (pages 1459–1472)

      Rasmus Siersbæk, Ronni Nielsen, Sam John, Myong-Hee Sung, Songjoon Baek, Anne Loft, Gordon L Hager and Susanne Mandrup

      Article first published online: 22 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.65

      Adipogenesis is a tightly controlled differentiation process regulated by a complex transcriptional network. Here, DNase I hypersensitive site analysis, DHSseq, reveals the genome-wide changes in chromatin structure that occur during adipogenesis and identifies sites that are bound by multiple transcription factors.

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      KDM5B regulates embryonic stem cell self-renewal and represses cryptic intragenic transcription (pages 1473–1484)

      Liangqi Xie, Carl Pelz, Wensi Wang, Amir Bashar, Olga Varlamova, Sean Shadle and Soren Impey

      Article first published online: 29 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.91

      Embryonic stem cell pluripotency depends on their epigenetic state, however, the pathways downstream of pluripotency factors remain unclear. Here, the Nanog target KDM5B, an H3K4me3 histone demethylase, is recruited to and activates genes involved in self-renewal, in part by facilitating transcriptional elongation by repressing cryptic transcripts.

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      Mg2+ facilitates leader peptide translation to induce riboswitch-mediated transcription termination (pages 1485–1496)

      Guang Zhao, Wei Kong, Natasha Weatherspoon-Griffin, Josephine Clark-Curtiss and Yixin Shi

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.66

      The 5′-UTR of the Salmonella Mg2+ transporter mgtA contains a magnesium sensitive riboswitch encompassing the ORF mgtL. MGTL translation is regulated by Mg2+-dependent opening of a ribosome-binding site and causes premature termination of mgtA transcription in cis.

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      Structural insights into cognate versus near-cognate discrimination during decoding (pages 1497–1507)

      Xabier Agirrezabala, Eduard Schreiner, Leonardo G Trabuco, Jianlin Lei, Rodrigo F Ortiz-Meoz, Klaus Schulten, Rachel Green and Joachim Frank

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.58

      This study presents the cryo-EM structure of the ribosome containing a near-cognate ternary complex. It reveals the structural basis of the induced-fit mechanism that is involved in the tRNA selection process.

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      Evidence that Aurora B is implicated in spindle checkpoint signalling independently of error correction (pages 1508–1519)

      Stefano Santaguida, Claudio Vernieri, Fabrizio Villa, Andrea Ciliberto and Andrea Musacchio

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.70

      Aurora B kinase corrects aberrant microtubule-chromosome attachments during mitosis. This function derives from Aurora B's role in the spindle assembly checkpoint, independently of its established role in the tension dependent microtubule-chromosome error correction mechanism.

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      Novel asymmetrically localizing components of human centrosomes identified by complementary proteomics methods (pages 1520–1535)

      Lis Jakobsen, Katja Vanselow, Marie Skogs, Yusuke Toyoda, Emma Lundberg, Ina Poser, Lasse G Falkenby, Martin Bennetzen, Jens Westendorf, Erich A Nigg, Mathias Uhlen, Anthony A Hyman and Jens S Andersen

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.63

      Organellar proteomics revealed a surprising complexity of centrosome composition. New combinatorial approaches now further extend the list of centrosome proteins, but also begin to elucidate their dynamics and differential localization.

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      p38MAPK is a novel DNA damage response-independent regulator of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (pages 1536–1548)

      Adam Freund, Christopher K Patil and Judith Campisi

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.69

      Senescent cells were shown to secrete inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, depending upon activation of the DNA damage response. Campisi and colleagues now show that this also requires additional signalling via the stress-activated p38MAP kinase pathway.

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      Ecdysteroids affect Drosophila ovarian stem cell niche formation and early germline differentiation (pages 1549–1562)

      Annekatrin König, Andriy S Yatsenko, Miriam Weiss and Halyna R Shcherbata

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.73

      Ecdysteroids affect Drosophila ovarian stem cell niche formation and early germline differentiation. The steroid hormone ecdysone regulates germline development and stem cell niche establishment in the Drosophila ovary by modulating TGF-β signalling and cell adhesion.

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      RB regulates pancreas development by stabilizing Pdx1 (pages 1563–1576)

      Yong-Chul Kim, So Yoon Kim, Jose Manuel Mellado-Gil, Hariom Yadav, William Neidermyer, Anil K Kamaraju and Sushil G Rane

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.57

      Pdx-1 is an essential transcriptional regulator in the pancreas. Here, the Retinoblastoma factor (Rb) is found to regulate Pdx-1 stability: in the absence of Rb, Pdx-1 is targeted for ubiquitin-mediated degradation and pancreatic development is disrupted.

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      Acute knockdown of AMPA receptors reveals a trans-synaptic signal for presynaptic maturation (pages 1577–1592)

      Tara E Tracy, Jenny J Yan and Lu Chen

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.59

      Postsynaptic AMPA receptors signal to presynaptic terminals to promote presynaptic function and neurotransmitter release.

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      Endocytosis of EphA receptors is essential for the proper development of the retinocollicular topographic map (pages 1593–1607)

      Sooyeon Yoo, Yujin Kim, Hyuna Noh, Haeryung Lee, Eunjeong Park and Soochul Park

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.44

      Rac-mediated internalization of the Eph receptor and its ligand ephrin is required for proper axonal guidance in vivo. Eph receptor/ephrin endocytosis reduces adhesive contacts between axons and their substrate, leading to axon retraction.

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      Sense transcription through the S region is essential for immunoglobulin class switch recombination (pages 1608–1620)

      Dania Haddad, Zéliha Oruc, Nadine Puget, Nathalie Laviolette-Malirat, Magali Philippe, Claire Carrion, Marc Le Bert and Ahmed Amine Khamlichi

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.56

      Class switch recombination (CSR) is preceded by sense and antisense transcription of the switch (S) regions. While sense transcription of the S region is needed for CSR, antisense transcription is not essential.

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      Grb2 regulates B-cell maturation, B-cell memory responses and inhibits B-cell Ca2+ signalling (pages 1621–1633)

      Jochen A Ackermann, Daniel Radtke, Anna Maurberger, Thomas H Winkler and Lars Nitschke

      Article first published online: 22 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.74

      Grb2 regulates B-cell maturation, B-cell memory responses and inhibits B-cell Ca2+ signalling. The adaptor protein Grb2 regulates different signalling pathways, but its role in primary B cells is not known. Using B-cell-specific Grb2-deficient mice, the findings show that Grb2 is important for the development of mature B cells and memory B-cell function.

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      Hydrophobicity as a driver of MHC class I antigen processing (pages 1634–1644)

      Lan Huang, Matthew C Kuhls and Laurence C Eisenlohr

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.62

      Infection leads to the generation of MHC class I-restricted peptides. The authors demonstrate that an exposed hydrophobic transmembrane domain leads to rapid protein degradation and MHC class I peptide generation.

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      Central functions of bicarbonate in S-type anion channel activation and OST1 protein kinase in CO2 signal transduction in guard cell (pages 1645–1658)

      Shaowu Xue, Honghong Hu, Amber Ries, Ebe Merilo, Hannes Kollist and Julian I Schroeder

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.68

      Bicarbonate acts as an intracellular signalling molecule and activates S-type anion channels (SLAC1) in guard cells.

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      A structural basis for Lowe syndrome caused by mutations in the Rab-binding domain of OCRL1 (pages 1659–1670)

      Xiaomin Hou, Nina Hagemann, Stefan Schoebel, Wulf Blankenfeldt, Roger S Goody, Kai S Erdmann and Aymelt Itzen

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.60

      Mutations in the Rab-effector protein OCRL1 give rise to Lowe syndrome. The structural characterization of the OCRL1/Rab8a interaction reveals a novel Rab-effector binding mode and elucidates the structural consequences of disease-relevant ORCL1 mutations.

  3. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Have you seen?
    3. Article
    4. Corrigendum
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      Crucial function of histone deacetylase 1 for differentiation of teratomas in mice and humans (page 1671)

      Sabine Lagger, Dominique Meunier, Mario Mikula, Reinhard Brunmeir, Michaela Schlederer, Matthias Artaker, Oliver Pusch, Gerda Egger, Astrid Hagelkruys, Wolfgang Mikulits, Georg Weitzer, Ernst W Muellner, Martin Susani, Lukas Kenner and Christian Seiser

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.88

      This article corrects:

      Crucial function of histone deacetylase 1 for differentiation of teratomas in mice and humans

      Vol. 29, Issue 23, 3992–4007, Article first published online: 22 OCT 2010

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