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EMBO reports

Cover image for Vol. 13 Issue 7

July 2012

Volume 13, Issue 7

Pages 577–659

  1. Upfront

    1. Top of page
    2. Upfront
    3. Science & Society
    4. Review
    5. Scientific Reports
    1. Editorial

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      At the cliff's edge (page 577)

      Howy Jacobs

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.84

      With academic economists offering a plethora of views on how to solve the sovereign debt crisis, Howy suggests that muddling through might be a wiser course than paying heed to theoreticians.

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      Time to talk (page 578)

      Holger Breithaupt

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.77

      Debate over the publication of the H5N1 flu virus papers highlights the need for better risk management of dual-use research. Scientists should start this discussion instead of waiting for governments to implement regulation.

    3. Opinion

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      Adaptive governance of synthetic biology (page 579)

      Joyce Tait

      Version of Record online: 1 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.76

      As resistance to synthetic biology slowly coalesces, governments and scientists need to be proactive to avoid a repetition of the near moratorium on genetically modified crops in Europe.

    4. Meeting Point

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      Singapore signalling: the 2012 hedgehog pathway cocktail (pages 580–583)

      James Briscoe and Rajat Rohatgi

      Version of Record online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.79

      The ‘Hedgehog Signalling in Development Evolution and Disease’ conference took place in Singapore in March 2012. It brought leading researchers together to discuss the latest findings, and exchange ideas, on every aspect of Hedgehog signalling.

  2. Science & Society

    1. Top of page
    2. Upfront
    3. Science & Society
    4. Review
    5. Scientific Reports
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Engineering and ethical perspectives in synthetic biology : Rigorous, robust and predictable designs, public engagement and a modern ethical framework are vital to the continued success of synthetic biology. (pages 584–590)

      James Anderson, Natalja Strelkowa, Guy-Bart Stan, Thomas Douglas, Julian Savulescu, Mauricio Barahona and Antonis Papachristodoulou

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.81

      The applications of synthetic biology will involve the release of artificial life forms into the environment. These organisms will present unique safety challenges that need to be addressed by researchers and regulators to win public engagement and support

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      Heritability lost; intelligence found : Intelligence is integral to the adaptation and survival of all organisms faced with changing environments (pages 591–595)

      Ken Richardson

      Version of Record online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.83

      The rise of intelligence was vital to evolution; the ability to process and predict rapidly changing environments allowed increasingly complex organisms to survive and thrive. Intelligence remains a fundamental property of the system rather than a discretely heritable trait.

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      Sex and gender differences in health : Science & Society Series on Sex and Science (pages 596–603)

      Vera Regitz-Zagrosek

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.87

      The new concept of evidence-based sex and gender medicine—which includes the fundamental differences of biology and behaviour between women and men—should improve health care for both sexes.

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      H5N1 infects the biosecurity debate : Governments and life scientists are waking up to the problem of dual-use research (pages 604–607)

      Philip Hunter

      Version of Record online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.80

      The generation of mutant H5N1 flu virus raised fundamental questions about the assessment and management of the risks of dual-use biological research. Governments might well increase oversight and regulation to rectify the current shortcomings.

  3. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Upfront
    3. Science & Society
    4. Review
    5. Scientific Reports
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      The base of the cilium: roles for transition fibres and the transition zone in ciliary formation, maintenance and compartmentalization (pages 608–618)

      Jeremy F Reiter, Oliver E Blacque and Michel R Leroux

      Version of Record online: 1 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.73

      This review discusses two underappreciated regions at the base of the cilium: the basal body distal end and the transition zone, both of which have varied and important roles in cilia biogenesis, maintenance and compartmentalization.

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      Shaping the landscape: mechanistic consequences of ubiquitin modification of chromatin (pages 619–630)

      Sigurd Braun and Hiten D Madhani

      Version of Record online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.78

      Post-translational modifications regulate the function of chromatin and thus gene expression. A spatially and temporally controlled spectrum of ubiquitylation events, including degradatory ubiquitylation of histones, histone-modifying enzymes, and non-histone chromatin factors, shapes the physical chromatin landscape.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Shaping the landscape: mechanistic consequences of ubiquitin modification of chromatin

      Vol. 13, Issue 12, 1152, Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2012

  4. Scientific Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Upfront
    3. Science & Society
    4. Review
    5. Scientific Reports
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      SUMOylation of Blimp-1 is critical for plasma cell differentiation (pages 631–637)

      Hsia-Yuan Ying, Shin-Tang Su, Pang-Hung Hsu, Che-Chang Chang, I-Ying Lin, Yu-Hsuan Tseng, Ming-Daw Tsai, Hsiu-Ming Shih and Kuo-I Lin

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.60

      Blimp-1 is shown to be SUMOylated by PIAS1 at lysine 816. This modification is needed for HDAC2 interaction and transcriptional repression during plasma cell differentiation and its abrogation impairs the generation of antibody-secreting cells.

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      Mutant p53 interactome identifies nardilysin as a p53R273H-specific binding partner that promotes invasion (pages 638–644)

      Cynthia R Coffill, Patricia A J Muller, Hue Kian Oh, Suat Peng Neo, Kelly A Hogue, Chit Fang Cheok, Karen H Vousden, David P Lane, Walter P Blackstock and Jayantha Gunaratne

      Version of Record online: 1 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.74

      Mutant p53 promotes metastasis in vivo. By using advanced proteomics, this study identifies several mutant p53-specific binding partners, one of which—nardilysin—binds p53R273H and promotes a p53R273H-dependant invasive response to HB–EGF.

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      Pds5 promotes cohesin acetylation and stable cohesin–chromosome interaction (pages 645–652)

      Sabine Vaur, Amélie Feytout, Stéphanie Vazquez and Jean-Paul Javerzat

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.72

      This study shows that Pds5 is essential for cohesin acetylation by Eso1 in S-phase, thereby mediating the establishment of sister chromatid cohesion. In addition, Pds5 promotes a stable interaction of cohesin with replicated chromosomes.

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      Group I and II mammalian PAKs have different modes of activation by Cdc42 (pages 653–659)

      Yohendran Baskaran, Yuen-Wai Ng, Widyawilis Selamat, Felicia Tay Pei Ling and Ed Manser

      Version of Record online: 1 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.75

      This study shows that PAK4—the prototypic group II p21-activated kinase—is constitutively phosphorylated in its activation-loop, in contrast to group I PAKs, and inhibited until its interaction with Cdc42 by a newly identified auto-inhibitory domain.

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