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EMBO reports

Cover image for Vol. 13 Issue 8

August 2012

Volume 13, Issue 8

Pages 661–764

  1. Upfront

    1. Top of page
    2. Upfront
    3. Science & Society
    4. Review
    5. Scientific Reports
    1. Editorial

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      Vaster, hotter, grainier (page 661)

      Howy Jacobs

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.94

      In a light-hearted preview of the Olympics, Howy asks which countries would win the medals if molecular biology was included as an official event.

    2. Hot off the Press

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      Elucidating the temporal order of silencing (pages 662–663)

      Elisa Izaurralde

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.91

      Three recent studies, one published in this issue of EMBO reports, show that miRNA-mediated translational inhibition of mRNA targets precedes mRNA deadenylation and decay.

    3. Meeting Point

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      A half-century after the molecular clock: new dimensions of molecular evolution (pages 664–666)

      Eugene V Koonin

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.103

      The EMBO Workshop on ‘Evolution in the Time of Genomics’ took place in May 2012. The meeting focused on phenomena that are not part of the traditional narrative of molecular evolution and which might signal a paradigm shift in the field.

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      Lipids as organizers of cell membranes (pages 667–669)

      Benoît Kornmann and Aurélien Roux

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.104

      The 105th Boehringer Ingelheim Fonds International Titisee Conference ‘Lipids as Organizers of Cell Membranes’ gathered cell biologists and biophysicists to discuss the interplay between lipids and proteins in biological membranes, with an emphasis on how technological advances could help fill the gap in our understanding of the lipid part of the membrane.

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      The young and happy marriage of membrane traffic and cell polarity (pages 670–672)

      Barry J Thompson, Franck Perez and Thomas Vaccari

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.98

      The ESF–EMBO Meeting on ‘Cell polarity and Membrane Traffic’ took place in April 2012. It brought together scientists from two once very separate fields and highlighted the emerging interdependence between them.

  2. Science & Society

    1. Top of page
    2. Upfront
    3. Science & Society
    4. Review
    5. Scientific Reports
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      Measuring the societal impact of research : Research is less and less assessed on scientific impact alone—we should aim to quantify the increasingly important contributions of science to society (pages 673–676)

      Lutz Bornmann

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.99

      The global financial crisis has changed how nations and agencies prioritize research investment. There has been a push towards science with expected benefits for society, yet devising reliable tools to predict and measure the social impact of research remains a major challenge.

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      The ‘atom-splitting’ moment of synthetic biology : Nuclear physics and synthetic biology share common features (pages 677–679)

      Alex J Valentine, Aleysia Kleinert and Jerome Verdier

      Version of Record online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.95

      Synthetic biology and nuclear physics share many commonalities in terms of public perception and funding. Synthetic biologists could learn valuable lessons from the history of the atomic bomb and nuclear power.

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      Where next for antibiotics? : The immune system and the nature of pathogenicity are providing vital clues in the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria (pages 680–683)

      Philip Hunter

      Version of Record online: 6 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.101

      The prevalence of drug resistance in major pathogenic bacteria is an increasingly severe public health problem. In addition to looking for new antibiotics, researchers are focusing on the immune system and the nature of pathogenicity itself to devise new strategies for fighting infectious disease.

  3. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Upfront
    3. Science & Society
    4. Review
    5. Scientific Reports
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      Innate immune signalling at the intestinal epithelium in homeostasis and disease (pages 684–698)

      Johanna Pott and Mathias Hornef

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.96

      The intestinal epithelium actively contributes to mucosal health and defense. This review analyses specific epithelial cell functions within the diverse cellular composition of the mucosal tissue, in the presence of the complex and dynamic gut microbiota.

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      Dendritic spines: from structure to in vivo function (pages 699–708)

      Nathalie L Rochefort and Arthur Konnerth

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.102

      Dendritic spines receive inputs from excitatory axons, but questions about their function remain. This review tackles our understanding of their structural and biochemical properties, and the imaging methods that allow spine activity to be studied in living tissue. These new results shed light on the development, integration properties and plasticity of dendritic spines.

  4. Scientific Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Upfront
    3. Science & Society
    4. Review
    5. Scientific Reports
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      Intracellular single molecule microscopy reveals two kinetically distinct pathways for microRNA assembly (pages 709–715)

      Sethuramasundaram Pitchiaya, John R Androsavich and Nils G Walter

      Version of Record online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.85

      This study reports a new method—iSHiRLOC—that allows an unprecedented resolution in the visualization of functional small RNAs. Its use has revealed the existence of both a time-dependent and an mRNA-dependent pathway for miRNA assembly.

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      Kinetic analysis reveals successive steps leading to miRNA-mediated silencing in mammalian cells (pages 716–723)

      Julien Béthune, Caroline G Artus-Revel and Witold Filipowicz

      Version of Record online: 8 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.82

      Kinetic analysis of the effect of miRNAs on target mRNA reporters over time reveals that translational repression precedes mRNA deadenylation and decay.

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      Tankyrase 1 regulates centrosome function by controlling CPAP stability (pages 724–732)

      Mi Kyung Kim, Charles Dudognon and Susan Smith

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.86

      Centrosomal P4.1-associated protein (CPAP) degradation and function is shown to be controlled by the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase tankyrase 1. CPAP PARsylation precisely precedes its degradation in G1, limiting centriole elongation and ensuring proper centrosome function.

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      Src-dependent autophagic degradation of Ret in FAK-signalling-defective cancer cells (pages 733–740)

      Emma Sandilands, Bryan Serrels, Simon Wilkinson and Margaret C Frame

      Version of Record online: 26 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.92

      Ret is shown to be a Src-dependent autophagy substrate upon defective FAK signalling, when Src is known to induce its own autophagic degradation. Thus, Src is a general mediator of FAK-binding kinase degradation under adhesion stress, enabling cancer cell survival.

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      Nuclear movement during myotube formation is microtubule and dynein dependent and is regulated by Cdc42, Par6 and Par3 (pages 741–749)

      Bruno Cadot, Vincent Gache, Elena Vasyutina, Sestina Falcone, Carmen Birchmeier and Edgar R Gomes

      Version of Record online: 26 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.89

      Mono-nucleated myoblasts fuse to form multi-nucleated myotubes. After the fusion, the myoblast nucleus moves towards the centre of the myotube. This movement is driven by microtubules and dynein, and is regulated by Cdc42, Par6 and Par3.

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      Kindlin 2 forms a transcriptional complex with β-catenin and TCF4 to enhance Wnt signalling (pages 750–758)

      Yu Yu, Junzhou Wu, Yunling Wang, Ting Zhao, Bo Ma, Yuqing Liu, Weigang Fang, Wei-Guo Zhu and Hongquan Zhang

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.88

      A direct interaction between Kindlin-2, active β-catenin and Tcf4 is shown. This transcriptional complex is required for Kindlin-2-induced tumour cell invasion.

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      Loss of fused in sarcoma (FUS) promotes pathological Tau splicing (pages 759–764)

      Denise Orozco, Sabina Tahirovic, Kristin Rentzsch, Benjamin M Schwenk, Christian Haass and Dieter Edbauer

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/embor.2012.90

      Tau mRNA is identified as a splicing target of FUS in mouse brain. FUS silencing leads to inclusion of Tau exons 3 and 10, and phenocopies Tau loss-of-function, providing new insights into the generation of the neurodegenerative diseases ALS and FTLD.

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