You have free access to this content

EMBO reports

Cover image for Vol. 15 Issue 3

March 2014

Volume 15, Issue 3

Pages 199–322

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Opinion
    4. Hot off the Press
    5. Correspondence
    6. Science & Society
    7. Reviews
    8. Scientific Reports
    9. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Skinhead on the MTA (page 199)

      Howy Jacobs

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201438434

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sharing research materials between labs is surely the simplest and most straightforward way to implement a scientific collaboration. Or is it?

  2. Opinion

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Opinion
    4. Hot off the Press
    5. Correspondence
    6. Science & Society
    7. Reviews
    8. Scientific Reports
    9. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Spies, data and research (page 200)

      Linda Briceño Moraia and Jane Kaye

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201338387

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The debate over the NSA spying could lead to stricter regulation of private health and genomic data in the EU, which could hamper biomedical research.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Leafy biofactories: producing industrial oils in non-seed biomass (pages 201–202)

      Craig C Wood

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201338132

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Plant biotechnologists are developing a new option for the sustainable production of oleochemicals. The notion of crops producing industrial oils is not new, but the possibility of using leaves—not oilseeds—might be a surprise to many.

  3. Hot off the Press

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Opinion
    4. Hot off the Press
    5. Correspondence
    6. Science & Society
    7. Reviews
    8. Scientific Reports
    9. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Plk1 puts a (Has)pin on the mitotic histone code (pages 203–204)

      Tatiana Moutinho-Santos and Helder Maiato

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201438472

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two studies, one in this issue of EMBO reports, show how Haspin is activated, which is important for cell division. A cascade of CDK1/cyclin B and Plk1-mediated phosphorylation leads to activation in mitosis, histone 3 phosphorylation, and Aurora B recruitment to centromeres.

    2. You have free access to this content
      The gatekeepers of mitochondrial calcium influx: MICU1 and MICU2 (pages 205–206)

      Malini Ahuja and Shmuel Muallem

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201438446

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this issue of EMBO reports, Kimberli Kamer and Vamsi Mootha demonstrate that MICU1 and MICU2 together, but non-redundantly, inhibit mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake when cytosolic [Ca2+] is below threshold, but permit uptake when calcium levels rise.

  4. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Opinion
    4. Hot off the Press
    5. Correspondence
    6. Science & Society
    7. Reviews
    8. Scientific Reports
    9. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      How does the journal impact factor affect the CV of PhD students? (page 207)

      Fabian Sanchis-Gomar

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201338351

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A comment on Howy's editorial “Dear DORA”.

  5. Science & Society

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Opinion
    4. Hot off the Press
    5. Correspondence
    6. Science & Society
    7. Reviews
    8. Scientific Reports
    9. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Mind-altering drugs and research: from presumptive prejudice to a Neuroscientific Enlightenment? : Science & Society series on “Drugs and Science” (pages 208–211)

      David Nutt

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201338282

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The tight control of psychedelic drugs prevents important research into potential treatments for various mental health disorders. The scientific community should speak out against what is effectively censorship of research.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Flu season : An interview with Jeffery K. Taubenberger, Chief of the Viral Pathogenesis and Evolution Section at the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (pages 212–217)

      Holger Breithaupt

      Article first published online: 7 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201438423

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An interview with Jeffery Taubenberger from NIAID about how understanding the evolution of influenza could inform vaccine development and public health measures to deal with flu pandemics.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Self-surveillance : Should you worry or simply embrace your personal data? (pages 218–222)

      Laurie Frick

      Article first published online: 7 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201438460

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We can sequence genomes, track sleep patterns, record exercise levels and estimate health risks. But why? Perhaps art can help us take ownership of and learn from our personal data.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Health research 2.0 : The use in research of personal fitness or health data shared on social network raises both scientific and ethical concerns (pages 223–226)

      Katrin Weigmann

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201438510

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Social networking on the Internet empowers patients to discuss their illnesses and access a bonanza of health information. However, research using the personal data shared on these networks raises important ethical and statistical questions.

    5. You have free access to this content
      One organ at a time : Research has been making much progress to create in vitro human tissues for transplantation but laboratory-grown complex organs still remain decades away (pages 227–230)

      Philip Hunter

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201438528

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Advances in stem cell science have enabled scientists to grow human tissue from a patient's own cells for transplantation. Although the first simple organs and tissues have already been successfully transplanted, it will be decades before it is possible to grow complex organs such as the kidney or heart.

  6. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Opinion
    4. Hot off the Press
    5. Correspondence
    6. Science & Society
    7. Reviews
    8. Scientific Reports
    9. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Dynamic survey of mitochondria by ubiquitin (pages 231–243)

      Mafalda Escobar-Henriques and Thomas Langer

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201338225

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This review analyzes the roles of ubiquitin at mitochondria, where it controls mitochondrial dynamics, contacts with the ER, maternal mtDNA inheritance, mitophagy, innate immune responses, and xenophagy. Thus, ubiquitin is a central regulator of mitochondrial homeostasis.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Dedifferentiation and reprogramming: origins of cancer stem cells (pages 244–253)

      Dinorah Friedmann-Morvinski and Inder M Verma

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201338254

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Research in the reprogramming of somatic cells has also led to a better understanding of the origin of cancer stem cells. This review discusses cancers that may be the product of somatic cell reprogramming and as such constitute potential risks to the application of iPSCs in regenerative medicine.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration (pages 254–263)

      Fernando M Mar, Azad Bonni and Mónica M Sousa

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201337723

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This review discusses the cell intrinsic responses to axon injury that—if activated—might enhance the limited regenerative capacity of CNS neurons, and the relevance of new findings to possible therapeutic approaches.

  7. Scientific Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Opinion
    4. Hot off the Press
    5. Correspondence
    6. Science & Society
    7. Reviews
    8. Scientific Reports
    9. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Stable MCC binding to the APC/C is required for a functional spindle assembly checkpoint (pages 264–272)

      Jamin B Hein and Jakob Nilsson

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201337496

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Whether formation of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) is sufficient for a functional spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) remains unclear. This study shows that the MCC needs to stably interact with the APC/C for proper checkpoint function, ensuring accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Polo-like kinase-1 triggers histone phosphorylation by Haspin in mitosis (pages 273–281)

      Linli Zhou, Xiaoying Tian, Cailei Zhu, Fangwei Wang and Jonathan MG Higgins

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201338080

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      During mitosis, Haspin phosphorylates histone H3 at Thr 3 to recruit the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC). This study shows that this event is controlled by Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Haspin, which is required for H3 modification in early mitosis and thus for appropriate CPC recruitment.

    3. You have free access to this content
      A direct role of Mad1 in the spindle assembly checkpoint beyond Mad2 kinetochore recruitment (pages 282–290)

      Thomas Kruse, Marie Sofie Yoo Larsen, Garry G Sedgwick, Jón Otti Sigurdsson, Werner Streicher, Jesper V Olsen and Jakob Nilsson

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201338101

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study—published alongside one from the Hauf laboratory—shows that Mad1 is necessary for spindle checkpoint activation and mitotic arrest in mammalian cells even when closed Mad2 is artificially tethered to kinetochores, revealing a new function of Mad1 in this checkpoint.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Mad1 contribution to spindle assembly checkpoint signalling goes beyond presenting Mad2 at kinetochores (pages 291–298)

      Stephanie Heinrich, Katharina Sewart, Hanna Windecker, Maria Langegger, Nadine Schmidt, Nicole Hustedt and Silke Hauf

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201338114

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study, published alongside one from the Nilsson laboratory, shows that Mad1 mutants that still recruit Mad2 to kinetochores cannot activate the spindle assembly checkpoint in yeast. Thus, Mad1 has an additional, hitherto unidentified role in this process.

    5. You have free access to this content
      MICU1 and MICU2 play nonredundant roles in the regulation of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (pages 299–307)

      Kimberli J Kamer and Vamsi K Mootha

      Article first published online: 6 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201337946

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The mitochondrial calcium uniporter is regulated by MICU1 and MICU2. Using gene knockouts, Ca2+ physiology, and biochemistry, this study shows that MICU1 and MICU2 operate together, with nonredundant roles, in inhibiting Ca2+ uptake when cytosolic [Ca2+] is below threshold, but permitting transport when [Ca2+] rises.

    6. You have free access to this content
      SNARE and regulatory proteins induce local membrane protrusions to prime docked vesicles for fast calcium-triggered fusion (pages 308–314)

      Tanmay A M Bharat, Jörg Malsam, Wim J H Hagen, Andrea Scheutzow, Thomas H Söllner and John A G Briggs

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201337807

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cryo-electron tomography of regulated SNARE-mediated membrane fusion shows that synaptic vesicles induce a protrusion in the target membrane that may prime them for fusion.

    7. You have free access to this content
      Type VI secretion and bacteriophage tail tubes share a common assembly pathway (pages 315–321)

      Yannick R Brunet, Jérôme Hénin, Hervé Celia and Eric Cascales

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201337936

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study shows that the Type VI secretion-associated Hcp protein assembles into tubes in a head-to-tail manner. Hcp tube formation requires the VgrG protein and is necessary for proper polymerization of the TssB/C sheath.

  8. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Opinion
    4. Hot off the Press
    5. Correspondence
    6. Science & Society
    7. Reviews
    8. Scientific Reports
    9. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Ubiquitin in the immune system (page 322)

      Julia Zinngrebe, Antonella Montinaro, Nieves Peltzer and Henning Walczak

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201470030

      This article corrects:

      Ubiquitin in the immune system

      Vol. 15, Issue 1, 28–45, Article first published online: 27 DEC 2013

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION