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EMBO reports

Cover image for Vol. 15 Issue 4

April 2014

Volume 15, Issue 4

Pages 323–453

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Hot off the Press
    4. Science & Society
    5. Reviews
    6. Scientific Reports
    7. Erratum
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      A Global Academy of Sciences (page 323)

      Howy Jacobs

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201438533

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      Do scientists speak with one voice? Obviously we have a diversity of opinions, but when it comes to expert advice, it would surely be far more efficient if everyone had just one port of call, a Global Academy of Sciences.

  2. Hot off the Press

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Hot off the Press
    4. Science & Society
    5. Reviews
    6. Scientific Reports
    7. Erratum
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      Myc and differentiation: going against the current (pages 324–325)

      Antonio Iavarone and Anna Lasorella

      Version of Record online: 10 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201438509

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      A study in this issue reveals an unexpected neurogenic function of MYC in the intact-polarized chick neural tube. It shows that Myc represses Notch signaling and promotes asymmetric neurogenic cell divisions.

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      When Mad met Bub (pages 326–328)

      Katharina Overlack, Veronica Krenn and Andrea Musacchio

      Version of Record online: 21 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201438574

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      Two recent studies in EMBO reports identify a new role for Mad1 in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which prevents cells from dividing until all chromosomes are attached to the spindle. These findings are integrated into an updated model of SAC activation.

  3. Science & Society

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Hot off the Press
    4. Science & Society
    5. Reviews
    6. Scientific Reports
    7. Erratum
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      Drugs and placebos: what's the difference? : Understanding the molecular basis of the placebo effect could help clinicians to better use it in clinical practice (pages 329–332)

      Fabrizio Benedetti

      Version of Record online: 17 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201338399

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      The placebo effect is well known from clinical trials but often misunderstood. Neuroscientists are picking apart the neurological pathways involved in the hopes of using placebos to enhance clinical practice.

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      Biomedical research's unpaid debt : NIH's initiative to support and implement fairer competition for minority students is a welcome step to redress the exploitation of African Americans by science (pages 333–337)

      Winston E Thompson, Roland A Pattillo, Jonathan K Stiles and Gerald Schatten

      Version of Record online: 20 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201338274

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      African Americans suffered exploitation and discrimination in biomedical research long after the abolition of slavery and still face inequalities in research today. The NIH has begun to redress these historical and present-day injustices.

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      Exposure, effects, and public health challenges : An interview with Linda Birnbaum, Director of the US National Institute of Environmental Health Services (pages 338–341)

      Version of Record online: 12 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201438564

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      An interview with Linda S. Birnbaum, Director of the US National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), about the evolution of toxicology to address new health issues.

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      Spinning the web of open science : Social networks for scientists and data sharing, together with open access, promise to change the way research is conducted and communicated (pages 342–346)

      Andrea Rinaldi

      Version of Record online: 20 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201438659

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      Numerous social networks that cater specifically to scientists seek to improve the way science is done by using the Internet to enhance communication and cooperation among researchers.

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      Tropical diseases and the poor : Neglected tropical diseases are a public health problem for developing and developed countries alike (pages 347–350)

      Philip Hunter

      Version of Record online: 20 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201438652

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      Neglected tropical diseases are not confined to developing countries; they also hit the poor and disenfranchised in developed nations.

  4. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Hot off the Press
    4. Science & Society
    5. Reviews
    6. Scientific Reports
    7. Erratum
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      Neurogenesis during development of the vertebrate central nervous system (pages 351–364)

      Judith TML Paridaen and Wieland B Huttner

      Version of Record online: 17 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201438447

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      This review discusses recent insights into the mechanisms that regulate vertebrate embryonic neurogenesis, including asymmetric cell division, transcriptional and epigenetic regulation, and signaling pathways.

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      Regulation of stem cell function by protein ubiquitylation (pages 365–382)

      Alexandros Strikoudis, Maria Guillamot and Iannis Aifantis

      Version of Record online: 20 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201338373

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      Stem cells integrate environmental signals to control differentiation and self-renewal. The crucial role that ubiquitin has in regulating stem cell fate and behavior is analyzed in this Review, as well as how alterations in these processes initiate tumorigenesis.

  5. Scientific Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Hot off the Press
    4. Science & Society
    5. Reviews
    6. Scientific Reports
    7. Erratum
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      MYC proteins promote neuronal differentiation by controlling the mode of progenitor cell division (pages 383–391)

      Nikolay Zinin, Igor Adameyko, Margareta Wilhelm, Nicolas Fritz, Per Uhlén, Patrik Ernfors and Marie Arsenian Henriksson

      Version of Record online: 5 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201337424

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      This study reveals an unexpected role for MYC in the control of stemness versus differentiation of neural stem cells in vivo and shows that Myc represses Notch signaling and promotes asymmetric neurogenic cell divisions.

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      TBC1D5 and the AP2 complex regulate ATG9 trafficking and initiation of autophagy (pages 392–401)

      Doris Popovic and Ivan Dikic

      Version of Record online: 6 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201337995

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      How membranes are remodeled during autophagosome formation is not well understood. This study shows that the RabGAP protein TBC1D5 and the AP2 complex contribute to the correct sorting of ATG9-containing vesicles during autophagy initiation.

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      The expression level of small non-coding RNAs derived from the first exon of protein-coding genes is predictive of cancer status (pages 402–410)

      Athanasios Zovoilis, Andrew J Mungall, Richard Moore, Richard Varhol, Andy Chu, Tina Wong, Marco Marra and Steven JM Jones

      Version of Record online: 17 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201337950

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      The expression of small non-coding RNAs encoded within the first exon of genes can be used to efficiently identify cancer samples and classify patients into subgroups of different survival. Such pan-cancer association is the first link between these RNAs and disease.

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      Transcriptional properties and splicing of the flamenco piRNA cluster (pages 411–418)

      Coline Goriaux, Sophie Desset, Yoan Renaud, Chantal Vaury and Emilie Brasset

      Version of Record online: 21 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201337898

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      This study reveals new insights into primary biogenesis of piRNAs. flamenco, the main somatic piRNA cluster in Drosophila, is transcribed by RNA polymerase II in a Cubitus interruptus-dependent manner. The long single-stranded RNA precursor is alternatively spliced before being processed into piRNAs.

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      The transcription factor FBI-1 inhibits SAM68-mediated BCL-X alternative splicing and apoptosis (pages 419–427)

      Pamela Bielli, Roberta Busà, Savino M Di Stasi, Manuel J Munoz, Flavia Botti, Alberto R Kornblihtt and Claudio Sette

      Version of Record online: 10 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201338241

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      The oncogenic transcription factor FBI-1 regulates alternative splicing by preventing the splicing regulator SAM68 from binding to BCL-X mRNA. This increases anti-apoptotic BCL-X isoform expression and cell survival.

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      FIP5 phosphorylation during mitosis regulates apical trafficking and lumenogenesis (pages 428–437)

      Dongying Li, Anthony Mangan, Louis Cicchini, Ben Margolis and Rytis Prekeris

      Version of Record online: 3 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201338128

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      This study shows that epithelial lumen formation is regulated by FIP5 phosphorylation, which inhibits its interaction with SNX18 during metaphase and anaphase, ensuring that the transport of apical endocytic carriers happens only after the formation of the AMIS.

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      Toll-like receptor 9 protects non-immune cells from stress by modulating mitochondrial ATP synthesis through the inhibition of SERCA2 (pages 438–445)

      Yasunori Shintani, Hannes CA Drexler, Hidetaka Kioka, Cesare MN Terracciano, Steven R Coppen, Hiromi Imamura, Masaharu Akao, Junichi Nakai, Ann P Wheeler, Shuichiro Higo, Hiroyuki Nakayama, Seiji Takashima, Kenta Yashiro and Ken Suzuki

      Version of Record online: 7 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201337945

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      TLR9 signalling has recently been shown to protect cardiomyocytes and neurons from stress by modulating energy metabolism. This study shows that it does so by inhibiting SERCA2 activity and thus the Ca2+ transfer between SR/ER and mitochondria.

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      Meristem-specific expression of epigenetic regulators safeguards transposon silencing in Arabidopsis (pages 446–452)

      Tuncay Baubec, Andreas Finke, Ortrun Mittelsten Scheid and Ales Pecinka

      Version of Record online: 21 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201337915

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      Repetitive DNA sequences are prone to be activated in plant embryonic tissues. Reinforced silencing in the shoot apical meristem is shown here to prevent their expression in post-embryonic tissues.

  6. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Hot off the Press
    4. Science & Society
    5. Reviews
    6. Scientific Reports
    7. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
      EU Life revives funding debate (page 453)

      Philip Hunter

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/embr.201438616

      This article corrects:

      EU-LIFE revives funding debate

      Vol. 14, Issue 12, 1047–1049, Version of Record online: 15 NOV 2013

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