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EMBO Molecular Medicine

Cover image for Vol. 6 Issue 4

April 2014

Volume 6, Issue 4

Pages 431–568

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    8. Corrigendum
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      The emerging role of Nrf2 in dermatotoxicology (pages 431–433)

      Nguan S Tan and Walter Wahli

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/emmm.201303797

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      A new study in this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine reveals unsuspected biological functions of prolonged Nrf2 activation on skin homeostasis and provides novel molecular insights into MADISH pathogenesis.

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      A magic bullet to specifically eliminate mutated mitochondrial genomes from patients' cells (pages 434–435)

      Carlos T Moraes

      Version of Record online: 12 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/emmm.201303769

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      In this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, mitochondrial-targeted zinc finger nucleases (mtZFN) are used to alter the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmy balance in cells derived from patients with mitochondrial diseases.

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      The heart-liver metabolic axis: defective communication exacerbates disease (pages 436–438)

      Kedryn K Baskin, Angie L Bookout and Eric N Olson

      Version of Record online: 12 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/emmm.201303800

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      Baskin, Bookout and Olson discuss a paper by Magida & Leiwand in this issue, which provides evidence that crosstalk occurs between the heart and liver, and that this becomes disrupted in the diseased state.

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      AMPed up to treat prostate cancer: novel AMPK activators emerge for cancer therapy (pages 439–441)

      Matthew J Schiewer and Karen E Knudsen

      Version of Record online: 21 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/emmm.201303737

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      An article published in this issue by Zadra et al shows that a novel small molecule activator of AMPK targets androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells and curbs tumor growth by suppressing de novo lipogenesis, inhibition of mTORC1 pathways, and enhanced apoptosis.

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      Activation of Nrf2 in keratinocytes causes chloracne (MADISH)-like skin disease in mice (pages 442–457)

      Matthias Schäfer, Ann-Helen Willrodt, Svitlana Kurinna, Andrea S Link, Hany Farwanah, Alexandra Geusau, Florian Gruber, Olivier Sorg, Aaron J Huebner, Dennis R Roop, Konrad Sandhoff, Jean-Hilaire Saurat, Erwin Tschachler, Marlon R Schneider, Lutz Langbein, Wilhelm Bloch, Hans-Dietmar Beer and Sabine Werner

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/emmm.201303281

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      Novel and unexpected activities of Nrf2 in the control of hair follicle and sebaceous gland homeostasis provide the first evidence for a role of NRF2 and downstream signaling in the pathogenesis of chloracne/MADISH

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      Mitochondrially targeted ZFNs for selective degradation of pathogenic mitochondrial genomes bearing large-scale deletions or point mutations (pages 458–466)

      Payam A Gammage, Joanna Rorbach, Anna I Vincent, Edward J Rebar and Michal Minczuk

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/emmm.201303672

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      Mutations and rearrangements of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are a common cause of human disease, where they often co-exist with wild-type mtDNA within a single cell. Mitochondrially targeted engineered zinc finger nucleases (mtZFNs) can phenotypically rescue a severe mtDNA-mediated dysfunction and show future therapeutic potential.

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      Nuclear translocation of FGFR1 and FGF2 in pancreatic stellate cells facilitates pancreatic cancer cell invasion (pages 467–481)

      Stacey J Coleman, Athina-Myrto Chioni, Mohammed Ghallab, Rhys K Anderson, Nicholas R Lemoine, Hemant M Kocher and Richard P Grose

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/emmm.201302698

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      Chemical or RNAi-mediated inhibition of nuclear FGFR1 and FGF2 leads to disruption of the tumour-supportive microenvironment provided by pancreatic stellate cells thus preventing pancreatic cancer cell invasion.

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      Metabolic crosstalk between the heart and liver impacts familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (pages 482–495)

      Jason A Magida and Leslie A Leinwand

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/emmm.201302852

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      A primary cardiac myocyte defect leads to aberrant lipid accumulation and signaling in the liver. The resulting hepatic phenotype impacts cardiac function. Normalization of heart lipid delivery or inhibition of gluconeogenesis improves ventricular function.

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      Prostaglandin E2 promotes post-infarction cardiomyocyte replenishment by endogenous stem cells (pages 496–503)

      Ying-Chang Hsueh, Jasmine M F Wu, Chun-Keung Yu, Kenneth K Wu and Patrick C H Hsieh

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/emmm.201303687

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      Although lost cardiomyocytes could be replenished after injury, the efficiency is extremely low. Here, the authors show that PGE2 treatment at a critical time period improves stem cell-mediated cardiac repair in young mice and restores it in aged animals.

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      Delayed transplantation of precursor cell-derived astrocytes provides multiple benefits in a rat model of Parkinsons (pages 504–518)

      Christoph Proschel, Jennifer L Stripay, Chung-Hsuan Shih, Joshua C Munger and Mark D Noble

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/emmm.201302878

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      In vitro-generated astrocytes GDAsBMP transplantation is the first example of a multimodal single therapeutic cell therapy approach with the potential to promote recovery of multiple neuron populations of relevance to Parkinson's Disease in a rat model.

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      A novel direct activator of AMPK inhibits prostate cancer growth by blocking lipogenesis (pages 519–538)

      Giorgia Zadra, Cornelia Photopoulos, Svitlana Tyekucheva, Pedram Heidari, Qing Ping Weng, Giuseppe Fedele, Hong Liu, Natalia Scaglia, Carmen Priolo, Ewa Sicinska, Umar Mahmood, Sabina Signoretti, Neal Birnberg and Massimo Loda

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/emmm.201302734

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      Direct activation of AMPK with a novel, highly specific compound curbs prostate cancer growth via inhibition of de novo lipogenesis. The combination of AMPK activation and hormonal therapy results in a synergistic anti-cancer effect.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: A novel direct activator of AMPK inhibits prostate cancer growth by blocking lipogenesis

      Vol. 6, Issue 10, 1357, Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2014

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      Contrasting responses of non-small cell lung cancer to antiangiogenic therapies depend on histological subtype (pages 539–550)

      Marta Larrayoz, Ruben Pio, María J Pajares, Isabel Zudaire, Daniel Ajona, Oriol Casanovas, Luis M Montuenga and Jackeline Agorreta

      Version of Record online: 5 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/emmm.201303214

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      Antiangiogenic therapies induce contrasting responses in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) depending on the histological subtype. Anti-VEGFR2 therapies stabilize adenocarcinomas but induce tumor cell hyperproliferation in squamous cell carcinomas.

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      Defects in GABA metabolism affect selective autophagy pathways and are alleviated by mTOR inhibition (pages 551–566)

      Ronak Lakhani, Kara R Vogel, Andreas Till, Jingjing Liu, Sarah F Burnett, K Michael Gibson and Suresh Subramani

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/emmm.201303356

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      Defects in GABA metabolism lead to its accumulation, which can cause severe neurological and behavioral disorders like SSADH deficiency. By activating mTOR/Tor, GABA inhibits selective autophagy pathways, suggesting a therapeutic application for mTOR inhibitors in GABA metabolic disorders.

  7. Corrigendum

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      The Fragile X Protein binds mRNAs involved in cancer progression and modulates metastasis formation (pages 567–568)

      Rossella Lucá, Michele Averna, Francesca Zalfa, Manuela Vecchi, Fabrizio Bianchi, Giorgio La Fata, Franca Del Nonno, Roberta Nardacci, Marco Bianchi, Paolo Nuciforo, Sebastian Munck, Paola Parrella, Rute Moura, Emanuela Signori, Robert Alston, Anna Kuchnio, Maria Giulia Farace, Vito Michele Fazio, Mauro Piacentini, Bart De Strooper, Tilmann Achsel, Giovanni Neri, Patrick Neven, D Gareth Evans, Peter Carmeliet, Massimiliano Mazzone and Claudia Bagni

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/emmm.201470030

      This article corrects:

      The Fragile X Protein binds mRNAs involved in cancer progression and modulates metastasis formation

      Vol. 5, Issue 10, 1523–1536, Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2013

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