Energy Technology

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 11

November 2013

Volume 1, Issue 11

Pages 621–703

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Forum Section
    5. Review
    6. Full Papers
    7. Book Review
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Graphene-Based Flexible Micrometer-Sized Microbial Fuel Cell (Energy Technol. 11/2013) (page 621)

      Justine E. Mink, Ramy M. Qaisi and Prof. Muhammad M. Hussain

      Version of Record online: 8 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201390020

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      Microbial Fuel Cells—Turning Waste into Energy: A membrane-free low-cost micrometer-sized microbial fuel cell is described in the Full Paper on page 648 by Muhammad M. Hussain and colleagues at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology. The cell was fabricated by using graphene as the anode and an air cathode to generate nanowatts of power. The graphene layer was grown on a nickel thin film by using chemical vapor deposition at atmospheric pressure. Microbial fuel cells harvest electrical energy produced by bacteria during the natural decomposition of organic matter, and this design is potentially useful for self-powered labs on chips and for rapid screening to scale up large-scale microbial fuel cells for water purification.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Review of Oxygen Carriers for Chemical Looping with Oxygen Uncoupling (CLOU): Thermodynamics, Material Development, and Synthesis (Energy Technol. 11/2013) (page 622)

      Qasim Imtiaz, Davood Hosseini and Prof. Dr. Christoph Rüdiger Müller

      Version of Record online: 8 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201390021

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      Chemical Looping with Oxygen Uncoupling: The cover picture illustrates the process of chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU), which is an emerging 3rd-generation carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technology. In CLOU, molecular oxygen is provided at elevated temperatures by the decomposition reaction of a solid oxygen carrier, thus, effectively combusting a solid fuel in an oxyfuel mode. In the Review by Christoph Müller and colleagues at ETH Zürich on page 633, the authors review recent advances in the development of new oxygen carriers for CLOU. In particular, the physical, thermodynamic, and chemical properties of the new materials are reviewed and their synthesis strategies are discussed in detail.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Forum Section
    5. Review
    6. Full Papers
    7. Book Review
  3. Forum Section

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Forum Section
    5. Review
    6. Full Papers
    7. Book Review
    1. Forum Section (pages 630–632)

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201305017

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      The latest news from the world of energy technology, including energy generation, conversion, storage, and distribution.

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Forum Section
    5. Review
    6. Full Papers
    7. Book Review
    1. Review of Oxygen Carriers for Chemical Looping with Oxygen Uncoupling (CLOU): Thermodynamics, Material Development, and Synthesis (pages 633–647)

      Qasim Imtiaz, Davood Hosseini and Prof. Dr. Christoph Rüdiger Müller

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201300099

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      Capturing carbon: Chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU) is an emerging 3rd-generation technology for carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), for which molecular oxygen is provided at elevated temperatures from the decomposition reaction of a solid oxygen carrier. In this review, the physical, thermodynamic, and chemical properties of the new materials and the synthesis strategies employed are discussed in detail.

  5. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Forum Section
    5. Review
    6. Full Papers
    7. Book Review
    1. Graphene-Based Flexible Micrometer-Sized Microbial Fuel Cell (pages 648–652)

      Justine E. Mink, Ramy M. Qaisi and Prof. Muhammad M. Hussain

      Version of Record online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201300085

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      Microbes to the rescue! A low-cost micrometer-sized microbial fuel cell is fabricated that can generate nanowatts of power from microliters of liquids. The sustainable design is comprised of a graphene anode, an air cathode, and a polymer platform for flexibility. This design is potentially useful for self-powered labs on chips and for rapid screening to scale up large-scale microbial fuel cells for water purification.

    2. Total Oxidation of Propane by using Platinum-Group-Metal Catalysts Recovered from Fuel-Cell Recycling (pages 653–660)

      Thomas Mollenhauer, Dr. Peter Scholz and Bernd Ondruschka

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201300095

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      Precious Metals in Reuse: Reference data is collected for the reuse of recycled fuel cell materials as gas purification catalysts in catalytic afterburning. A representative number of metal-foam catalysts containing platinum, palladium, and ruthenium are studied by using the total oxidation of propane as a model reaction over a ternary precious-metal system.

    3. Maximizing the Solar Gain of a Grid-Interactive Solar Photovoltaic Power Plant (pages 661–667)

      Vidyotma Thakur and Prof. S. S. Chandel

      Version of Record online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201300118

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      No pain, no gain: As a case study, the monthly, seasonal, and yearly optimum tilt angles are determined to optimize the solar gain for a 190 kWp grid-interactive solar power plant installed at Khatkar-Kalan in India. The methodology followed can be used for enhancing the power produced by solar photovoltaic plants at any location worldwide.

    4. Li-ion Reaction to Improve the Rate Performance of Nanoporous Anatase TiO2 Anodes (pages 668–674)

      Dr. Yan-Bing He, Ming Liu, Zheng-Long Xu, Dr. Biao Zhang, Prof. Baohua Li, Prof. Feiyu Kang and Prof. Jang-Kyo Kim

      Version of Record online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201300081

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      A highly rated performance: The root causes of the capacity losses in anatase TiO2 anodes are identified and effectively controlled. The initial capacity losses of TiO2 are ascribed to the irreversible Li ion interfacial storage capability arising mainly from the high reactivity between TiO2 and the electrolyte solution. TiO2-Li is prepared by reacting TiO2 with Li ions, which presents a much lower initial capacity loss, higher rate performance, and better reversibility.

    5. Analysis of the Effect of Cellulose Particle Size on the Rate of Microbial Hydrolysis for Bioethanol Production (pages 675–684)

      Dr. Davide Dionisi

      Version of Record online: 4 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201300088

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      Size matters! The effect of particle size on the rate of microbial cellulose hydrolysis is investigated by analyzing the ratio of the cellulose and of the microbial biomass surface areas. The model shows that decreasing the cellulose particle size can have significant beneficial effects on the rate of microbial hydrolysis, which therefore makes the microbial processes more attractive in the context of bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass.

    6. Fuel Properties of Croton megalocarpus, Calophyllum inophyllum, and Cocos nucifera (coconut) Methyl Esters and their Performance in a Multicylinder Diesel Engine (pages 685–694)

      A. E. Atabani, Irfan Anjum Badruddin, T. M. I. Mahlia, H. H. Masjuki , M. Mofijur, Keat Teong Lee and W. T. Chong

      Version of Record online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201300110

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      Jack and the feedstocks: This study presents three promising biodiesel feedstocks (image). The physicochemical properties of biodiesel (B100), B10, and B20 and evaluation of engine performance and emission are presented in this study.The main findings show that all biodiesel blends emit lower CO and HC compared to diesel. Moreover, the Croton and coconut blends increase the emission of nitrous oxides (NO) whereas Calophyllum has lower NO emissions compared to diesel.

    7. Soot Cake Oxidation on a Diesel Particulate Filter: Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy Observation and Thermogravimetric Analysis (pages 695–701)

      Yuki Kameya and Kyeong O. Lee

      Version of Record online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201300103

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      Soot cake dynamics: As a new experimental approach to investigate the oxidation behavior of soot cake on the porous wall of a diesel particulate filter (DPF), an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) is a useful tool. In this study, soot cake oxidation characteristics are discussed by considering the dynamic behavior of the soot cake and the oxidation rate determined through thermogravimetric analysis.

  6. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Forum Section
    5. Review
    6. Full Papers
    7. Book Review
    1. Advanced Silicon Materials for Photovoltaic Applications. Edited by Sergio Pizzini (pages 702–703)

      Prof. Chung-wen Lan

      Version of Record online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201305015

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      Wiley, Chichester 2012, 405 pp., hardcover, €129.00—ISBN 978-0-470-66111-6

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