Energy Technology

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 5‐6

June 2013

Volume 1, Issue 5-6

Pages 293–366

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Forum Section
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    7. Book Review
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      Cover Picture: Realizing the Storage of Pressurized Hydrogen in Carbon Nanotubes Sealed with Aqueous Valves (Energy Technol. 5-6/2013) (page 293)

      Dr. Changyu Tang, Changzhen Man, Prof. Yungui Chen, Fei Yang, Linshan Luo, Prof. Zhi-Feng Liu, Jun Mei, Prof. Woon-Ming Lau and Prof. Ka-Wai Wong

      Version of Record online: 20 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201390008

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      Nanoscale Tanks for Pressurized Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen has long been recognized as a clean and renewable fuel with great promise, as water is the only by-product from the consumption of abundantly available hydrogen fuel. However, the practical utilization of hydrogen fuel is severely restricted by the lack of a viable solution for hydrogen storage. In automotive applications, the use of heavy stainless-steel cylinders of pressurized hydrogen not only reduces the energy efficiency substantially, but also poses a serious safety issue. The Communication by Ka-wai Wong and colleagues at Chengdu Green Energy and Green Manufacturing R & D Center on page page 309 demonstrates that single-walled carbon nanotubes can be used to store pressurized hydrogen by using aqueous valves to seal the ends. The storage and release of hydrogen with these nanocapsules was thermally controlled by heating the nanotubes above the melting temperature of the ice. In this proof of concept, hydrogen was stored at a pressure of 5.0 MPa without significant leakage. Preliminary estimation reveals that an attractive gravimetric energy efficiency as high as 9 % would be achieved at a storage pressure of 1 GPa hydrogen.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Forum Section
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    7. Book Review
  3. Forum Section

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Forum Section
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    7. Book Review
    1. Forum Section (pages 300–303)

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201305004

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Forum Section
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    7. Book Review
    1. Si-Composite Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries with High Initial Coulombic Efficiency (pages 305–308)

      Dr. Xingkang Huang, Haejune Kim, Shumao Cui, Patrick T. Hurley and Prof. Junhong Chen

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201300017

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      An ode to anodes: Si–Fe–Al composite materials are synthesized by high-energy ball-milling as anodes for lithium-ion batteries. The as-prepared Si composite anodes deliver high capacity values, high Coulombic efficiencies, and good cycle performance. The performance is mainly attributed to the unique structure of elemental Si uniformly distributed amongst inactive intermetallic phases.

    2. Realizing the Storage of Pressurized Hydrogen in Carbon Nanotubes Sealed with Aqueous Valves (pages 309–312)

      Dr. Changyu Tang, Changzhen Man, Prof. Yungui Chen, Fei Yang, Linshan Luo, Prof. Zhi-Feng Liu, Jun Mei, Prof. Woon-Ming Lau and Prof. Ka-Wai Wong

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201300039

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      Cold as ice: Inspired by a computational discovery, aqueous-valve-equipped nanocontainers fabricated from fine pieces of ice and single-walled carbon nanotubes enable the storage and release of pressurized hydrogen. Hydrogen at 1 GPa locked in these nanocontainers already corresponds to a weight storage efficiency of approximately 9 %, close to the 2015 target from the US Department of Energy.

    3. Flexible Glass for High Temperature Energy Storage Capacitors (pages 313–318)

      Dr. Mohan Prasad Manoharan, Dr. Chen Zou, Dr. Eugene Furman, Dr. Nanyan Zhang, Douglas I. Kushner, Dr. Shihai Zhang, Dr. Takashi Murata and Prof. Michael T. Lanagan

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201300031

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      Through the rolled-up glass: We demonstrate an alkali-free glass (• in figure) with high permittivity, low dielectric loss, high energy density, and potential self-healing capabilities that significantly performs better for high temperature–high power capacitor applications prepared through a standard roll-to-roll process than currently used polymer films (shown for comparison).

  5. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Forum Section
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    7. Book Review
    1. High-Performance MxSb–Al2O3–C (M=Fe, Ni, and Cu) Nanocomposite-Alloy Anodes for Sodium-Ion Batteries (pages 319–326)

      Dr. Il Tae Kim, Eric Allcorn and Prof. Arumugam Manthiram

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201300023

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      High in sodium, high in performance: Sodium-ion batteries are synthesized by using a mechanical-milling process to fabricate nanocomposite anodes of the chemical form MxSb–Al2O3–C (M=Fe, Ni, Cu). Superior cyclic performance and high-rate capability are achieved and XRD patterns demonstrate the formation of Na3Sb phase during the incorporation of sodium.

    2. Mesoporous Nano-Si Anode for Li-ion Batteries Produced by Magnesio-Mechanochemical Reduction of Amorphous SiO2 (pages 327–331)

      Dr. Yoon Hwa, Dr. Won-Sik Kim, Byeong-Chul Yu, Prof. Seong-Hyeon Hong and Prof. Hun-Joon Sohn

      Version of Record online: 26 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201300032

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      Milling around: A method is presented for producing large amounts of mesoporous nano-sized Si through the reduction of amorphous SiO2 with Mg metal, by using a high-energy mechanical milling process (i.e., magnesio-mechanochemical processing) conducted for 1 h. A mesoporous nano-sized Si electrode shows excellent electrochemical performance as an anode for Li-ion batteries, with a capacity greater than 1600 mAh g−1 over 30 cycles.

    3. Fabrication of Supercapacitors using Carbon Microspheres Synthesized from Resorcinol–Formaldehyde Resin (pages 332–337)

      Dr. Suzhen Ren, Meng Wang, Cuiying Jia, Prof. Ce Hao and Xuzhen Wang

      Version of Record online: 17 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201300028

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      Sphere of influence: Carbon microspheres are derived from resorcinol–formaldehyde (RF) resin using ammonia aqueous solution as the catalyst and they are subsequently used as supercapacitor electrode materials. The present study shows that carbon microspheres from RF resin are electronically conductive materials with reduced mass transport resistance and they lead to improved supercapacitor performance reliability.

    4. CaMn0.875Ti0.125O3−δ as an Oxygen Carrier for Chemical-Looping with Oxygen Uncoupling (CLOU)—Solid-Fuel Testing and Sulfur Interaction (pages 338–344)

      Sebastian Sundqvist, Prof. Henrik Leion, Magnus Rydén, Prof. Anders Lyngfelt and Prof. Tobias Mattisson

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201300007

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      Solid results with solid fuels: CaMn0.875Ti0.125O3−δ is evaluated in a fluidized batch reactor for use as an oxygen carrier in the chemical looping combustion (CLC) of different solid fuels. The amount of the oxygen carrier that is used is varied while maintaining a constant fuel amount and an increase of the conversion rate is observed as more oxygen carrier is used.

    5. A Melamine-Modified β-Zeolite with Enhanced CO2 Capture Properties (pages 345–349)

      Khalil Ahmad, Omid Mowla, Prof. Eric M. Kennedy, Prof. Bogdan Z. Dlugogorski, Prof. John C. Mackie and Prof. Michael Stockenhuber

      Version of Record online: 20 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201300027

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      Melamine increases adsorption capacity! Zeolite β is modified using melamine and the inorganic–organic hybrid is capable of CO2 adsorption and regeneration at low temperature. The adsorbent shows excellent performance for CO2 adsorption–desorption in comparison to conventional adsorption systems.

    6. Chemical Reactions of Formaldehyde and Acetaldehyde in Supercritical Water (pages 350–358)

      Ryan Tschannen, Aaron Gonzales and Prof. Sunggyu Lee

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201300034

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      The path goes ever on: Reaction pathways for supercritical water gasification of feedstocks, such as biomass and glycerin, are examined by using formaldehyde and acetaldehyde as model compounds. A number of reactions leading to various gaseous products, as well as more complex compounds, are elucidated.

    7. Phase Stability of a Triglyceride/Alcohol/Catalytic-Surfactant System in Transesterification (pages 359–363)

      Gayan I. Nawaratna, William L. Rooney Jr., Christina Leonhardt and Prof. Sandun D. Fernando

      Version of Record online: 20 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201300029

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      Soyaanis-cat-si: emulsions in balance: Ternary phase diagrams give insight into the phase stability of triglyceride (soybean oil)/alcohol/catalytic-surfactant (metal alkoxide with an analogous alkyl group to alcohol) systems, thereby elucidating how this phase stabilization translates into effective transesterification catalysis. At high enough concentrations of catalyst the transesterification reaction occurs autonomously at room temperature.

  6. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Forum Section
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    7. Book Review

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