Energy Technology

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 5

May 2016

Volume 4, Issue 5

Pages 559–652

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Communications
    4. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Impact of Daily Startup–Shutdown Conditions on the Production of Solar Methanol over a Commercial Cu–ZnO–Al2O3 Catalyst (Energy Technol. 5/2016) (page 559)

      Dr. Uri Ash-Kurlander, Oliver Martin, Luca D. Fontana, Vikas R. Patil, Men Bernegger, Dr. Cecilia Mondelli, Prof. Javier Pérez-Ramírez and Prof. Aldo Steinfeld

      Version of Record online: 30 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201600188

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      From solar syngas to methanol: The sustainability of liquid fuel production like methanol would be greatly enhanced if the syngas feedstock was obtained from the renewably-powered splitting of H2O and the greenhouse gas CO2 rather than from the steam reforming of fossil fuels. In this context, a promising technology comprises the use of solar radiation. However, the limited and unsteady availability of sunlight, as illustrated on the cover, determines an intermittent syngas supply and fluctuations in its composition. As industrial methanol synthesis catalysts are typically operated under steady-state conditions for several years, the authors investigated the impact of a daily startup-shutdown procedure and of syngas feeds containing variable amounts of CO and CO2 on the catalytic properties of a commercial Cu–ZnO–Al2O3 catalyst. They uncovered that the activity, selectivity, and time-on-stream behavior of the ternary system can be retained depending on the gas atmosphere applied upon the startup–shutdown steps. Based on the structure-performance relations derived, they put forward guidelines for the design of improved catalysts. More details can be found in the Full Paper by Javier Pérez-Ramírez and Aldo Steinfeld et al. from ETH Zurich on page 565 in Issue 5, 2016 (DOI: 10.1002/ente.201600022).

  2. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Communications
    4. Full Papers
    1. Capturing CO2 Emissions in the Iron Industries using a Magnetite–Iron Mixture (pages 560–564)

      Dr. Sushant Kumar, Dr. Vadym Drozd, Dr. Andriy Durygin and Prof. Dr. Surendra K. Saxena

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201500451

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      No waste: A method is proposed to capture CO2 at iron and steel industries using a mixture of iron and magnetite. Both these materials are readily accessible at any ironmaking sites and can selectively combine with the CO2 gas present in blast furnace gas to form siderite. Unreacted raw materials can then be magnetically separated from siderite, which can be decomposed to generate magnetite and pure CO2 gas to regenerate the process.

  3. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Communications
    4. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Impact of Daily Startup–Shutdown Conditions on the Production of Solar Methanol over a Commercial Cu–ZnO–Al2O3 Catalyst (pages 565–572)

      Dr. Uri Ash-Kurlander, Oliver Martin, Luca D. Fontana, Vikas R. Patil, Men Bernegger, Dr. Cecilia Mondelli, Prof. Javier Pérez-Ramírez and Prof. Aldo Steinfeld

      Version of Record online: 23 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201600022

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Taking in the sun: Methanol production with the use of syngas derived from solar-driven splitting of CO2 and H2O is a promising route to sustainable liquid fuels. Herein, the feasibility of a dynamic syngas-to-methanol process over a commercial Cu–ZnO–Al2O3 catalyst is demonstrated. On the basis of structure–performance relations, guidelines for the design of improved catalysts are highlighted.

    2. Influence of Solvent Evaporation Rate in the Preparation of Carbon-Coated Lithium Iron Phosphate Cathode Films on Battery Performance (pages 573–582)

      Attila Gören, Daniel Cíntora-Juárez, Dr. Pedro Martins, Dr. Stanislav Ferdov, Prof. Maria Manuela Silva, Prof. José Luís Tirado, Dr. Carlos M. Costa and Prof. Senentxu Lanceros-Méndez

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201500392

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cathode to joy: The influence of the drying temperature of the cathode film on battery performance is highlighted. The drying of the electrode slurry is a common and important step in cathode preparation, and carbon-coated LiFePO4 cathode films should be dried between 80 and 100 °C to achieve the optimum battery performance with low polarization, good cyclability, and a high discharge capacity at different scan rates.

    3. Interplay of Anode, Cathode, and Current in Microbial Fuel Cells: Implications for Wastewater Treatment (pages 583–592)

      Zachary A. Stoll, Dr. Jan Dolfing, Prof. Zhiyong Jason Ren and Prof. Pei Xu

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201500397

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A give and take relationship: In this study of a microbial fuel cell, an interplay is observed between decreasing voltage losses at one electrode and increasing losses at the other. A model is developed to quantify this relationship. It is found that the anodic and cathodic losses are equal if real wastewater is used as the substrate (see figure; medR and medO: the reduced and oxidized electroactive species involved in direct electron transfer at the anode surface).

    4. Scalable and Cost-Effective Preparation of Hierarchical Porous Silicon with a High Conversion Yield for Superior Lithium-Ion Storage (pages 593–599)

      Dr. Xiaolin Liu, Rongrong Miao, Prof. Jun Yang, Jinzuan Wang, Yitian Bie, Jiulin Wang and Yanna Nuli

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201500400

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Multilevel marketing: Silicon-based anode materials should present excellent properties for lithium-ion batteries. A composite material comprising silicon wrapped with a carbon layer (Si@C) is successfully prepared by a scalable modified magnesiothermic reduction approach, which avoids the use of hydrogen fluoride (HF), followed by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) wrapping process. The resulting composite shows a multilevel porous structure that results in outstanding properties for lithium storage.

    5. Combination of Brønsted and Lewis Polymeric Catalysts for Efficient Conversion of Cellulose into 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in Ionic Liquids (pages 600–609)

      Yating Shen, Yunlei Zhang, Yao Chen, Prof. Yongsheng Yan, Prof. Jianming Pan, Meng Liu and Prof. Weidong Shi

      Version of Record online: 30 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201500415

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cellulose—Break it down: High internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) are used to prepare poly(HIPEs) with the addition of chromium as catalysts with Lewis acidic sites. Additional catalysts with Brønsted acidic sites are obtained by ion-exchanging. Then, the two catalysts are applied to the biomass-to-HMF conversion by breaking down cellulose. The reactions show good production yields with high catalyst recyclability.

    6. Pelletization of Immobilized Amine Carbon Dioxide Sorbents with Fly Ash and Poly(vinyl chloride) (pages 610–619)

      Dr. Walter Christopher Wilfong, McMahan L. Gray, Dr. Brian W. Kail and Dr. Bret H. Howard

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201500419

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ashes to ashes: Immobilized amine CO2 sorbents are pelletized using a combination of fly ash and hydrophobic poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC). The resulting binder network produces pellets with high crush strength, good CO2 capture, and hydrophobicity. The attachment of aromatic amines to PVC enhanced both CO2 capture and resistance to pellet degradation.

    7. Energy Harvesting with a Bimorph Type Piezoelectric Diaphragm Multilayer Structure and Mechanically Induced Pre-stress (pages 620–624)

      Dr. Mikko Leinonen, Dr. Jari Juuti, Prof. Heli Jantunen and Jaakko Palosaari

      Version of Record online: 15 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201500429

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Feeling pre-stressed? Walk it off. The energy harvester is constructed from piezoelectric diaphragms which are stacked and pre-stressed with a mechanical spring. Mechanical pre-stress results in much higher power densities than previously reported for low frequency piezoelectric energy harvesting applications. Frequency, which closely corresponds to the pace of human walking, gives an average power output of 11.30 mW and a very high average power density of 10.55 mW cm−3.

    8. 3D Hierarchically Interconnected Porous Graphene Containing Sulfur for Stable High Rate Li–S Batteries (pages 625–632)

      Weiwei Qian, Prof. Dr. Qiuming Gao, Kai Yang, Weiqian Tian, Yanli Tan, Chunxiao Yang, Hang Zhang, Zeyu Li and Lihua Zhu

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201500430

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Easy path for sulfur: Hierarchically interconnected porous graphene (HIPG) composites with sulfur have been used as cathode materials in Li–S batteries. The optimized HIPG-900 sample contained a large proportion of sulfur; the resulting HIPG-900/S composite showed a highly stable and high specific capacity at a high rate of 10C when used in Li–S batteries.

    9. High-Temperature Dielectric Relaxation Behaviors of Relaxer-Like PbZrO3–SrTiO3 Ceramics for Energy-Storage Applications (pages 633–640)

      Dr. Tian-Fu Zhang, Prof. Xin-Gui Tang, Dr. Xian-Xiong Huang, Prof. Qiu-Xiang Liu, Prof. Yan-Ping Jiang and Prof. Qi-Fa Zhou

      Version of Record online: 8 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201500436

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Solid-solution storage: In the polarization/electric field plot for the PSZT30 ceramic, typical double hysteresis loops manifest the antiferroelectric phase at room temperature. For evaluation, the blue and gray areas represent the energy-storage and energy-loss densities (Jreco and Jloss), respectively. The electric-field-related energy-storage properties of the PSZT30 ceramic (inset) show that the Jreco and Jloss values increase as the electric field increases.

    10. Permittivity-Based Microwave Absorption Characteristics of Dongsheng Lignite during Pyrolysis (pages 641–646)

      Qing-dong Wang, Prof. Guang-hua Wang, Biao Chen and Shi-jie Wang

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201500437

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Doing the microwave: By testing the S11 & ψS11 parameters and adopting an artificial neural network model for calculation, the complex relative permittivity of Chinese Dongsheng lignite is acquired, which is used to reflect the microwave absorbing characteristics of the coal. Further analysis shows that the microwave absorption ability for Dongsheng lignite enhances quickly in the range of 300–600 °C and reach peak value at 700 °C.

    11. Elastocaloric and Piezocaloric Effects in Lead Zirconate Titanate Ceramics (pages 647–652)

      Satyanarayan Patel, Aditya Chauhan and Rahul Vaish

      Version of Record online: 7 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ente.201500446

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Built to elast: This article discusses stress-driven caloric effects can be obtained in bulk lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics. The strain and polarization gradient are utilized to determine the elastocaloric and piezocaloric effects, respectively. This study allows one to easily differentiate between caloric effects arising from polarization and strain changes.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION