Estimation and assessment of shipping emissions in the region of Ambarlı Port, Turkey

Authors

  • Cengiz Deniz,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Marine Engineering, Maritime Faculty, Istanbul Technical University, 34940 Tuzla, Istanbul, Turkey
    • Department of Marine Engineering, Maritime Faculty, Istanbul Technical University, 34940 Tuzla, Istanbul, Turkey
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  • Alper Kilic

    1. Department of Marine Engineering, Maritime Faculty, Istanbul Technical University, 34940 Tuzla, Istanbul, Turkey
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Abstract

Ships are significant air pollution sources as their high powered main engines often use heavy fuels. The major atmospheric components emitted are nitrogen oxides, particulate matter, sulfur oxides, carbon oxide, and toxic air pollutants. Shipping emissions cause serious effects on health and environment. These effects of emissions are seen especially in territorial waters, inland seas, canals, straits, bays, and port regions.

In this article, exhaust gas emissions from ships in Ambarlı Port, which is one of the main ports in Marmara Sea, are calculated by utilizing data acquired in 2005. Total emissions from ships in the port is estimated as 845 t y−1 for nitrogen oxides (NOx), 242 t y−1 for sulfur dioxide (SO2), 2127 t y−1 for carbon monoxide (CO), 78590 t y−1 for carbon dioxide (CO2), 504 t y−1 for volatile organic compound (VOC), and 36 t y−1 for particulate matter (PM). To simulate dispersions of emissions, a model program with the real topographic and meteorological conditions of the port region is used. Ships in Ambarlı Port contributed 100 μg m−3 NOx and 55 μg m−3 SO2 to ambient air concentrations in 2 km range from the port. It is estimated that 60,000 people live within this range and these people might be affected from the high level of NOx and SO2 due to combination of shipping emissions and other sources (traffic, industry, residential, etc). © 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Environ Prog, 2010

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