Pilot-scale study on ozone-enhanced catalytic oxidation of waste gas emissions from the pulp and paper industry

Authors

  • Endalkachew Sahle-Demessie,

    Corresponding author
    1. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH 45268
    • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH 45268
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  • Catherine B. Almquist,

    1. Paper Science and Chemical Engineering Department, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
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  • Venu Gopal Devulapelli

    1. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH 45268
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  • This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

Abstract

Field studies were conducted at Domtar's Kraft pulp and paper mill (Hawesville, KY) for 2 weeks to investigate the treatment of high volume, low concentration (HVLC) waste gas streams using ozone-enhanced catalytic oxidation technology. The contaminants in the HVLC waste gas from the pulping area of the mill contained mainly methanol (360 ± 80 ppm) and total reduced sulfur compounds [dimethyl sulfide (DMS) (4400 ± 670 ppm) and dimethyl disulfide (150 ± 25 ppm). The catalysts used in the field studies included ViO2/TiO2 and CuO/MoO3/ã-Al2O3. The results of the field study showed ozone-to-sulfur ratios >2, space velocities <1000 h−1, and reaction temperatures ≥250°C are required to achieve >90% destruction of DMS in the HVLC waste gas stream. Ozone-enhanced catalytic oxidation has key environmental advantages over incineration, including mild operating temperatures and thus, lower energy costs and lower NOx formation. Although the technology appeared to be feasible at the laboratory scale, the field study data revealed that several obstacles must be overcome prior to this technology being implemented at large scale. © 2010 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Environ Prog, 2011

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