Get access

Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Eating Disorders: A Systematic Review of Voxel-Based Morphometry Studies

Authors

  • Frederique Van den Eynde,

    Corresponding author
    • King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Psychological Medicine, Section of Eating Disorders, London, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
    • FVDE, MS and HB have equally contributed to the manuscript.

  • Masashi Suda,

    1. King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Psychological Medicine, Section of Eating Disorders, London, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
    • FVDE, MS and HB have equally contributed to the manuscript.

  • Hannah Broadbent,

    1. King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Psychological Medicine, Section of Eating Disorders, London, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
    • FVDE, MS and HB have equally contributed to the manuscript.

  • Sébastien Guillaume,

    1. King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Psychological Medicine, Section of Eating Disorders, London, UK
    2. Universite Montpellier, INSERM U1061, CHU de Montpellier, Montpellier, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Magali Van den Eynde,

    1. King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Psychological Medicine, Section of Eating Disorders, London, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Howard Steiger,

    1. Douglas University Institute, Psychiatry Department, McGill University, Eating Disorders Program, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Mimi Israel,

    1. Douglas University Institute, Psychiatry Department, McGill University, Eating Disorders Program, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Marcelo Berlim,

    1. Douglas University Institute, Psychiatry Department, McGill University, Depressive Disorders Program, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Vincent Giampietro,

    1. King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Neuroimaging, London, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Andrew Simmons,

    1. King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Neuroimaging, London, UK
    2. NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Janet Treasure,

    1. King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Psychological Medicine, Section of Eating Disorders, London, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Iain Campbell,

    1. King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Psychological Medicine, Section of Eating Disorders, London, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ulrike Schmidt

    1. King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Psychological Medicine, Section of Eating Disorders, London, UK
    Search for more papers by this author

Frederique Van den Eynde, Department of Psychological Medicine, Section of Eating Disorders, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London, SE5 8AF, UK. Tel: 00442078480160; Fax: 00442078480182.

E-mail: frederique.van_den_eynde@kcl.ac.uk

Abstract

This systematic review summarises and critically appraises the literature on structural magnetic resonance imaging in people with a current or past eating disorder. Studies using voxel-based morphometry image analysis were included. Ten studies reported on a total of 236 people with a current or past eating disorder and 257 healthy controls. Sample heterogeneity prohibited a meta-analytic approach. The findings do not unequivocally indicate grey or white matter volume abnormalities in people with an eating disorder. Nevertheless, these preliminary data suggest that, compared with healthy controls, people with anorexia nervosa have decreased grey matter in a range of brain regions and that those with bulimia nervosa have increased grey matter volumes in frontal and ventral striatal areas. Research in the recovery phase and longitudinal studies suggest that potential brain tissue abnormalities may recover with clinical improvement. Overall, as the available data are inconclusive, further efforts in this field are warranted. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

Ancillary