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Binge Eating, Binge Eating Disorder and Loss of Control Eating: Effects on Weight Outcomes after Bariatric Surgery

Authors

  • Gavin Meany,

    1. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Fargo, North Dakota, USA
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  • Eva Conceição,

    1. Universidade do Minho, Braga, Portugal
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  • James E. Mitchell

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Fargo, North Dakota, USA
    2. Neuropsychiatric Research Institute, Fargo, North Dakota, USA
    • Correspondence: James E. Mitchell, MD, Neuropsychiatric Research Institute, Fargo, North Dakota, USA. Tel: 701-365-4916; Fax: 701-293-3226.

      E-mail: jmitchell@nrifargo.com

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  • Supported by RO1 DK 84979 (JEM) from the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases in the National Institutes of Health

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that patients who have problems with binge eating (BE) or BE disorder (BED) are quite common among the severely obese, including bariatric surgery candidates. The literature suggests that in many cases such eating behaviours improve after bariatric surgery, although this is not uniformly true. The current paper reviews the data on the development of BE, BED and loss of control (LOC) eating after bariatric surgery and the impact of these problems on long-term weight outcome. A search was made of various databases regarding evidence of BE, BED and LOC eating post-operatively in bariatric surgery patients. The data extracted from the literature suggests that 15 research studies have now examined this question. Fourteen of the available 15 studies suggest that the development of problems with BE, BED or LOC eating post-bariatric surgery is associated with less weight loss and/or more weight regain post-bariatric surgery. These data suggests that it is important to identify individuals at high risk for these problems, to follow them post-operatively, and, if appropriate interventions can be developed if such behaviours occur in order to maximize weight loss outcomes. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

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