You have full text access to this Open Access content

Energy Science & Engineering

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 1

April 2013

Volume 1, Issue 1

Pages i–ii, 1–52

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Spotlight
    5. Short Communications
    6. Perspectives
    7. Review
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ese3.7

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Spotlight
    5. Short Communications
    6. Perspectives
    7. Review
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Discovering new energy solutions (page 1)

      Tomas Kåberger

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ese3.6

  3. Spotlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Spotlight
    5. Short Communications
    6. Perspectives
    7. Review
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      An overview of proactive wind turbine control (pages 2–11)

      Alexander Stotsky, Bo Egardt and Ola Carlson

      Version of Record online: 22 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ese3.5

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recent achievements in the proactive turbine control, based on the upwind speed measurements are described in a unified framework that in turn represents a systematic view of the control activity carried out within the Swedish Wind Power Technology Center (SWPTC).

  4. Short Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Spotlight
    5. Short Communications
    6. Perspectives
    7. Review
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Lock-in thermography as a tool for quality control of photovoltaic modules (pages 12–17)

      Andreas Vetter, Frank Fecher, Jens Adams, Raymund Schaeffler, Jean-Patrick Theisen, Christoph J. Brabec and Claudia Buerhop

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ese3.1

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We present a method which utilizes contactless ILIT (illuminated lock-in thermography) measurement of PV modules and image postprocessing in order to calculate the peak power of the modules. The method provides a valuable tool for PV quality control.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A simplified methodology for estimating solar spectral influence on photovoltaic energy yield using average photon energy (pages 18–26)

      Tetsuyuki Ishii, Kenji Otani, Akihiko Itagaki and Kenji Utsunomiya

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ese3.3

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In thi study, we estimate the net effect of solar spectrum on the annual energy yield of c-Si and a-Si modules using two parameters. One parameter is directly calculated from spectral factor (SF), and the other parameter is calculated from average photon energy (APE) and a regression line or curve. APE may be a useful index to quantify the effect of solar spectrum simply and easily, because the estimations by the two parameters are quite consistent with each other.

  5. Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Spotlight
    5. Short Communications
    6. Perspectives
    7. Review
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Next generation biorefineries will solve the food, biofuels, and environmental trilemma in the energy–food–water nexus (pages 27–41)

      Y.-H Percival Zhang

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ese3.2

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Out-of-the-box solutions will address the food, biofuels, and environment trilemma. Biomass will be sufficient to meet food, renewable materials and biofuels needs. Next-generation biorefineries will have a central role in the sustainability revolution.

  6. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Spotlight
    5. Short Communications
    6. Perspectives
    7. Review
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Biodiesel from grease interceptor to gas tank (pages 42–52)

      Alyse Mary E. Ragauskas, Yunqiao Pu and Art J. Ragauskas

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ese3.4

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Most developed and developing nations require the collection and proper disposal of trap sewer fats, oils and greases (FOG). This bioresource is a valuable feedstock for biodiesel and this review highlights the chemical constituents of this source of FOG and how it can be processed into biodiesel now and in the future.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION