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Bioavailability of decabromodiphenyl ether to the marine polychaete Nereis virens

Authors

  • Susan L. Klosterhaus,

    1. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, 1 Williams Street, Solomons, Maryland, 20688 USA
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  • Joel E. Baker

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, 1 Williams Street, Solomons, Maryland, 20688 USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Center for Urban Waters, University of Washington Tacoma, 1900 Commerce Street, Tacoma, WA 98402.
    • University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, 1 Williams Street, Solomons, Maryland, 20688 USA.
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Abstract

The flame retardant decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 209) accumulates in humans and terrestrial food webs, but few studies have reported the accumulation of BDE 209 in aquatic biota. To investigate the mechanisms controlling the bioavailability of BDE 209, a 28-d bioaccumulation experiment was conducted in which the marine polychaete worm Nereis virens was exposed to a decabromodiphenyl ether (deca-BDE) commercial mixture (>85% BDE 209) in spiked sediments, in spiked food, or in field sediments. Bioaccumulation from spiked substrate with maximum bioavailability demonstrated that BDE 209 accumulates in this species. Bioavailability depends on the exposure conditions, however, because BDE 209 in field sediments did not accumulate (<0.3 ng/g wet weight; 28-d biota-sediment accumulation factors [BSAFs] <0.001). When exposed to deca-BDE in spiked sediments also containing lower brominated congeners (a penta-BDE mixture), bioaccumulation of BDE 209 was 30 times lower than when exposed to deca-BDE alone. Selective accumulation of the lower brominated congeners supports their prevalence in higher trophic level species. The mechanisms responsible for limited accumulation of BDE 209 may involve characteristics of the sediment matrix and low transfer efficiency in the digestive fluid. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2010;29:860–868. © 2009 SETAC

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